Search results

1 – 10 of 84
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

David A.T. Southgate

Translating the conceptual basis of dietary fibre into a definitionthat can be used as the basis for practicable analytical methods hasbeen a matter for considerable debate…

Abstract

Translating the conceptual basis of dietary fibre into a definition that can be used as the basis for practicable analytical methods has been a matter for considerable debate amongst those involved in dietary fibre measurements. The original authors used the term “dietary fibre” for the plant cell wall material in foods and this provides the most satisfactory starting point in any discussion on analysis. Compares the two most widely used approaches for the measurement of dietary fibre and considers their bases in relation to the conceptual origin of dietary fibre as a protective factor in the diet.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 92 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

David A.T. Southgate and Richard M. Faulks

Evaluating the hypothesis that dietary fibre is a protective factor and interpretation of the nutritional advice to ‘eat more fibre’ is dependent on quantitative measurements of…

Abstract

Evaluating the hypothesis that dietary fibre is a protective factor and interpretation of the nutritional advice to ‘eat more fibre’ is dependent on quantitative measurements of dietary fibre. The analysis poses several very difficult analytical issues. Firstly there are the technical issues which arise whenever one analyses a complex mixture, especially of carbohydrates. Secondly, because different components exert different physiological effects, there is a need to characterise as well as quantify the dietary fibre if one wishes to understand or predict its effects; and thirdly, the definition of dietary fibre is couched in physiological terms that do not lend themselves to translation into analytical procedures.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 89 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1986

The times have come down to us as the “Good Old Days”, of Edwardian elegance and grace, peace and plenty, which conceal the poverty, squalor and disease. There seemed less…

Abstract

The times have come down to us as the “Good Old Days”, of Edwardian elegance and grace, peace and plenty, which conceal the poverty, squalor and disease. There seemed less resentment from those who suffered the rigours of the times than from those of today who only know of them by repute. Life was indeed cruel to the submerged tenth of society and the homeless waifs and strays were all too real and true.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 88 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1938

THERE are now so many meetings of the Library Association and its branches and sections that the good custom of recording meetings and the discussions at them has fallen into…

Abstract

THERE are now so many meetings of the Library Association and its branches and sections that the good custom of recording meetings and the discussions at them has fallen into desuetude. In a way it is a gain, for when the discussion was commonplace the account of a meeting became a mere list of those who attended and spoke, bones without flesh; but in the days when The Library Association Record really was a record, its reports were a part of the educational and informational material of every librarian. Something should be done about this, because 1938 opened with a series of meetings which all deserved the fullest report. The principal one was the investiture meeting of the President of the Library Association on January 17th. The attendance was greater than that at any meeting of librarians in recent years, of course other than the Annual Conference. Chaucer House was beautifully arranged, decorated and lighted for the occasion, an atmosphere of cheerfulness and camaraderie pervaded the affair. The speeches were limited to a few preliminary words by the retiring President, the Archbishop of York, before placing the badge on his successor's neck; a brief, but deserved panegyric of Dr. Temple's services by Mr. Berwick Sayers; and then a delightful acknowledgment from His Grace. The serious point the Archbishop made was his surprise at learning the wide extent of the library movement and his conviction that it must be of great value to the community. His lighter touch was exquisite; especially his story of the ceremonial key, which broke in the lock and jammed it when he was opening a library in state, and of his pause to settle mentally the ethical point as to whether he could conscientiously declare he had “opened” a place when he had made it impossible for anyone to get in until a carpenter had been fetched. Altogether a memorable evening, which proved, too, as a guest rightly said, that one cannot easily entertain librarians, but, if you get them together in comfortable conditions, they entertain themselves right well.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

The long controversy that has waxed furiously around the implementation of the EEC Directives on the inspection of poultry meat and hygiene standards to be observed in poultry…

Abstract

The long controversy that has waxed furiously around the implementation of the EEC Directives on the inspection of poultry meat and hygiene standards to be observed in poultry slaughterhouses, cutting‐up premises, &c, appears to be resolved at last. (The Prayer lodged against the Regulations when they were formally laid before Parliament just before the summer recess, which meant they would have to be debated when the House reassembled, could have resulted in some delay to the early operative dates, but little chance of the main proposals being changed.) The controversy began as soon as the EEC draft directive was published and has continued from the Directive of 1971 with 1975 amendments. There has been long and painstaking study of problems by the Ministry with all interested parties; enforcement was not the least of these. The expansion and growth of the poultry meat industry in the past decade has been tremendous and the constitution of what is virtually a new service, within the framework of general food inspection, was inevitable. None will question the need for efficient inspection or improved and higher standards of hygiene, but the extent of the

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 79 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2019

Ekta Duggal and Harsh V. Verma

Cool has been studied mostly in consumer samples drawn from Western countries. This study was inspired by paucity of literature on “cool” in an Indian context. There is certainty…

Abstract

Purpose

Cool has been studied mostly in consumer samples drawn from Western countries. This study was inspired by paucity of literature on “cool” in an Indian context. There is certainty that “cool” adds value and bestows desirability but there is uncertainty about what “cool” means. Since “cool” is a cultural phenomenon, the purpose of this paper is to explore its meaning in the Indian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were obtained on an open-ended questionnaire followed by depth probes on a sample of young consumers. The obtained scripts were coded and classified into semantic categories based on the grounded theory.

Findings

The study found that cool is indicated by seven facets, including being oneself, living life to the fullest, sense of humor and socially networked, and calm disposition. Unlike Western notions, in India, cool is not being deviant and hedonistic. The cultural and religious imprints are palpable in what is construed as cool in India.

Research limitations/implications

Transplanting the Western notions of cool for brand building is likely to be a risky proposition. It may not resonate with the inner cords of the Indian youth. The implication of this study is that it reveals possible ways in which cool can be incorporated in brand identity.

Practical implications

Cool is valued because it bestows distinction in subtle ways. Brands can gain traction among consumers by incorporating cool symbolism in their identity.

Originality/value

This study expands the understanding of cool in the context of an emerging market. This is one of the first studies to have probed the concept of “cool” in India.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Eleanor Peters

Abstract

Details

The Use and Abuse of Music: Criminal Records
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-002-8

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1977

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that…

Abstract

THE Reference Department of Paisley Central Library today occupies the room which was the original Public Library built in 1870 and opened to the public in April 1871. Since that date two extensions to the building have taken place. The first, in 1882, provided a separate room for both Reference and Lending libraries; the second, opened in 1938, provided a new Children's Department. Together with the original cost of the building, these extensions were entirely financed by Sir Peter Coats, James Coats of Auchendrane and Daniel Coats respectively. The people of Paisley indeed owe much to this one family, whose generosity was great. They not only provided the capital required but continued to donate many useful and often extremely valuable works of reference over the many years that followed. In 1975 Paisley Library was incorporated in the new Renfrew District library service.

Details

Library Review, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

David Gunston

What is it that makes this fruit so esteemed? First, itsbeautiful aroma which gives it a unique attraction on the dessert table. Then, its acid‐sweet flavour, ‘by quince out of…

Abstract

What is it that makes this fruit so esteemed? First, itsbeautiful aroma which gives it a unique attraction on the dessert table. Then, its acid‐sweet flavour, ‘by quince out of marrow’, and thirdly, its succulent juiciness with an added bonus of vitamin C

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 83 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1978

One of the major developments of the post‐War years has been the rise of consumer protection ‘watchdog’ committees galore, a flood of legislation and completely changed…

Abstract

One of the major developments of the post‐War years has been the rise of consumer protection ‘watchdog’ committees galore, a flood of legislation and completely changed enforcement methods by existing local authority officers who to all and intents have become a completely new service. Voluntary agencies, national and local, based on the local High Street, have appointed themselves the watchdogs of the retail trade; legislation and central departments, the larger scene. The new service has proved of inestimable value in the changed conditions; it continues to develop. When shopping was a personal transaction, with the housewife making her purchases from the shopkeeper or his staff on the opposite side of the counter; when each was well known to the other and the relationship had usually lasted for many years, often from one generation to the next, things were very different, complaints few, unsatisfactory items instantly replaced, usually without question. This continuing state of equanimity was destroyed by the retail revolution and new methods of advertising and marketing. Now, the numbers of complaints dealt with by consumer protection and environmental health departments of local authorities are truly enormous. We have become a nation of “complainers,” although in all conscience, we have much to complain about. Complaints cover the widest possible range of products and services, of which food and drink form an integral component. The complaints to enforcement authorities include many said to be unjustified, but from the reports of legal proceedings under relevant enactments, it is obvious that the bulk of them now originate from consumer complaints. Not all complainants, however, relish the thought of the case going before the courts. Less is heard publicly of complaints to the numerous voluntary bodies. Enforcement authorities see complaints in terms of infringements of the law, although their role as honest broker, securing recompense to the aggreived customer, has become important; a few departments being able to claim that they secured reimbursements and replacements of value totalling upwards of amounts which annually run into six figures. The broker role is also that adopted by voluntary bodies but with much less success since they lack the supporting authority of legal sanction.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 80 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

1 – 10 of 84