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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

David A. Oloke, David J. Edwards and Tony A. Thorpe

Construction plant breakdown affects projects by prolonging duration and increasing costs. Therefore, prediction of plant breakdown, as a precursor to conducting timely…

Abstract

Construction plant breakdown affects projects by prolonging duration and increasing costs. Therefore, prediction of plant breakdown, as a precursor to conducting timely maintenance works, cannot be underestimated. This paper thus sought to develop a model for predicting plant breakdown time from a sequence of discrete plant breakdown measurements that follow non‐random orders. An ARIMA (1,1,0) model was constructed following experimentation with exponential smoothening. The model utilised breakdown observations obtained from six wheeled loaders that had operated a total of 14,467 hours spread over a 300‐week period. The performance statistics revealed MAD and RMSE of 5.03 and 5.33 percent respectively illustrating that the derived time series model is accurate in modelling the dependent variable. Also, the F‐statistics from the ANOVA showed that the type and frequency of fault occurrence as a predictor variable is significant on the model's performance at the five percent level. Future work seeks to consider a more in depth multivariate time series analyses and compare/contrast the results of such against other deterministic modelling techniques.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

David Oloke

Abstract

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International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Dahiru Abdullahi, Suresh Renukappa, Subashini Suresh and David Oloke

Despite the abundant renewable energy potential in the Nigeria, the power-sector stakeholder has not paid attention to the prospect of the natural resources that can be…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the abundant renewable energy potential in the Nigeria, the power-sector stakeholder has not paid attention to the prospect of the natural resources that can be accrued when it is properly harnessed. Although a very negligible fraction of the population has invested in solar photovoltaics (PVs) for home solution, the initiative was only made public commercialised under the public-private partnership (PPP) and the objectives of the Power Sector Reform Act. 2005. It is, therefore, aimed to investigate the causes and insight of the barriers that are responsible for the slow implementation of the solar energy initiative in the Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was performed in the Nigeria. The study was conducted qualitatively, through semi-structured face-to-face interviews of 25 participants. The interviews were recorded, transcribed, interpreted, coded, categorised into themes and analysed by content analysis.

Findings

The study reveals technological, financial, political and social barriers have been the reason for slowing down solar energy development in Nigeria. While the technical barrier is a challenge to the solar energy implementation, socio-cultural issues have also been an obstacle to the implementation process. It is suggested that, the stakeholders of the initiative endeavour to proffer sustainable policies to enable public and private promoters to be able to generate and distribute electricity through solar PV and to complement the inadequate conventional electricity sources from the grids.

Originality/value

The paper provides a richer insight into the understanding and awareness of barriers for implementing solar energy strategies in Nigeria.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Tochukwu Moses, David Heesom and David Oloke

The purpose of this paper is to report on primary research findings that sought to investigate and analyse salient issues on the implementation of 5D building information…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on primary research findings that sought to investigate and analyse salient issues on the implementation of 5D building information modelling (BIM) from the UK contractors’ perspective. Previous research and efforts have predominantly focussed on the use of technologies for cost estimation and quantity takeoff within a more traditional-led procurement, with a paucity of research focussing on how 5D BIM could facilitate costing within contractor-led procurement. This study fills this current knowledge gap and enhances the understanding of the specific costing challenges faced by contractors in contractor-led projects, leading to the development of 5D framework for use in future projects.

Design/methodology/approach

To develop a fully detailed understanding of the challenges and issues being faced in this regard, a phenomenological, qualitative-based study was undertaken through interviews involving 21 participants from UK-wide construction organisations. A thematic data analytical process was applied to the data to derive key issues, and this was then used to inform the development of a 5D-BIM costing framework.

Findings

Multi-disciplinary findings reveal a range of issues faced by contractors when implementing 5D BIM. These exist at strategic, operational and technological levels which require addressing successful implementation of 5D BIM on contractor-led projects adhering to Level 2 BIM standards. These findings cut across the range of stakeholders on contractor-led projects. Ultimately, the findings suggest strong commitment and leadership from organisational management are required to facilitate cost savings and generate accurate cost information.

Practical implications

This study highlights key issues for any party seeking to effectively deploy 5D BIM on a contractor-led construction project. A considerable cultural shift towards automating and digitising cost functions virtually, stronger collaborative working relationship relative to costing in design development, construction practice, maintenance and operation is required.

Originality/value

By analysing findings from primary research data, the work concludes with the development of a 5D BIM costing framework to support contractor-led projects which can be implemented to ensure that 5D BIM is successfully implemented.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

David Oloke, David J. Edwards, Bruce Wright and Peter E.D. Love

Effective management and utilisation of plant history data can considerably improve plant and equipment performance. This rationale underpins statistical and mathematical…

Abstract

Effective management and utilisation of plant history data can considerably improve plant and equipment performance. This rationale underpins statistical and mathematical models for exploiting plant management data more efficiently, but industry has been slow to adopt these models. Reasons proffered for this include: a perception of models being too complex and time consuming; and an inability of their being able to account for dynamism inherent within data sets. To help address this situation, this research developed and tested a web‐based data capture and information management system. Specifically, the system represents integration of a web‐enabled relational database management system (RDBMS) with a model base management system (MBMS). The RDBMS captures historical data from geographically dispersed plant sites, while the MBMS hosts a set of (Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average – ARIMA) time series models to predict plant breakdown. Using a sample of plant history file data, the system and ARIMA predictive capacity were tested. As a measure of model error, the Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) ranged between 5.34 and 11.07 per cent for the plant items used in the test. The Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) values also showed similar trends, with the prediction model yielding the highest value of 29.79 per cent. The paper concludes with direction for future work, which includes refining the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and developing a Knowledge Based Management System (KBMS) to interface with the RDBMS.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2020

David Mensah Sackey, De-Graft Owusu-Manu, Richard Ohene Asiedu and Adam Braimah Jehuri

Ghana has recently reviewed its renewable energy Act 835 with an objective of providing 10% of its energy from renewables by 2020 (Ackah and Asomani, 2015). Meanwhile…

Abstract

Purpose

Ghana has recently reviewed its renewable energy Act 835 with an objective of providing 10% of its energy from renewables by 2020 (Ackah and Asomani, 2015). Meanwhile, solar Photovoltaic (PV) accounts for less than 2% of the energy mix (Energy Commission, 2018). In combating environmental issues such as climate change and meeting these policy targets, there is the urgent need to increase investment into the renewable sector. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to critically examine the impeding constraints to photovoltaic investment in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The Literature evaluation was carried out of critical constraints surrounding PV investments. Questionnaire was developed and administered online using Google form. Descriptive statistics was used to describe the features of each constraint. In addition, inferential analysis using relative importance index was used to rank these indicators. Again, one sample t-test was used to test the significance of the indicator. Multiple indicators were used to measure the latent constructs. Finally, independent test of mean equity was used to test relationship between the working experiences of despondence who have worked with solar PV below five years and those who worked from five years to ten years.

Findings

The research has highlights high installation and maintenance costs, lack of access to long-term capital finance, access to affordable consumer finance and lack of support to research and development as the major investment obstacles to solar PV investment in Ghana.

Research limitations/implications

It is recommended that the Government of Ghana should provide incentives such as tax waivers, which will encourage entrepreneurs, invest into PV. In addition, it is recommended that solar PV companies must collaborate with financial institutions to provide low interest and flexible consumer financing schemed that can enable home users to purchase the technology. Future research should complement this work by focusing on the impact of domestic currency volatility on PV investment. The scope of this study is constrained to the PV industry in Ghana.

Practical implications

This study will serve as a guide to the private sector business owners to help make critical PV investment decisions. It has also brought to the forefront the reason why solar PV account for a small fraction of Ghana’s energy mix.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to espouse the prevailing constraints to PV investment in Ghana and seeks to contribute to already existing literature that will make profound changes in state policy around PV investment. By understanding these difficulties, driving pointers can be recognized to encourage effective future venture inside the sustainable power source area. In this way, the research leads to a better understanding of the impeding factors that hinders PV investment in Ghana. Again, the paper has achieved new discovery with regards to variations between years of experience with PV use. The variation being less than five years with over five years of PV use. By understanding these difficulties, driving pointers can be recognized to invigorate effective future ventures.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Kweku Bedu Simpson and Aloysius Sam

This paper aims to investigate the contemporary strategies for Health and Safety (H&S) management practices at the construction sites in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the contemporary strategies for Health and Safety (H&S) management practices at the construction sites in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a mixed method approach in conducting a cross-sectional survey at 28 active construction sites in the Kumasi and Accra metropolises of Ghana using questionnaires and interview guide by using purposive, convenience and snowball sampling techniques. Data were collected from 170 survey respondents and 18 interview participants comprising artisans and management staff.

Findings

On H&S management practices, the study found that most construction sites have policies for H&S delivery and are duly followed and enforced. Nonetheless, construction workers moderately agreed that there was reward for; the avoidance and reduction of accidents and illnesses, good H&S behaviour and provision for insurance and hospital claims. It was also revealed that most of the construction sites adopt either one or a combination of mandatory H&S standards. Generally, most workers possessed a fairly positive perception about the H&S management practices at their sites and were either satisfied or very satisfied with its performance.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizing the findings beyond the study areas is limited because of the use of the non-probability sampling techniques.

Originality/value

This study focused on the active construction sites in the study areas to investigate their H&S practices against the backdrop of numerous publications describing the general H&S situation in Ghana as poor. It revealed the current H&S performance of the construction sites for the benefit of the construction industry, researchers and the academia.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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