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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Claude R. Martin, David A. Horne and Anne Marie Schultz

This paper addresses a major impediment to business‐to‐business service innovation. The focus is on the role played by the client in a service dominant offering, compared…

Abstract

This paper addresses a major impediment to business‐to‐business service innovation. The focus is on the role played by the client in a service dominant offering, compared to product dominant offerings. Part of this concerns the concept of customer input uncertainty includng the diversity of customer demand and the customer’s disposition to participate in the innovation process. The paper concludes by tracking and innovation process in a consultation between a major global consulting firm and one of its clients.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Claude R. Martin, David A. Horne and Winnie S. Chan

Focuses on the client in a management consulting relationship. Argues that any measure of service productivity must include some component that focues on the client side…

Abstract

Focuses on the client in a management consulting relationship. Argues that any measure of service productivity must include some component that focues on the client side of the service encounter. Client productivity – measurement and structure – requires more attention and research into the stage/backstage issues.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1995

Claude R. Martin Claude R. Martin Jr and David A. Horne

Examines the differences in internal and external inputs to the newservice development process for two innovations within the same firm.The differences are explored for…

Abstract

Examines the differences in internal and external inputs to the new service development process for two innovations within the same firm. The differences are explored for the most versus least successful innovations. The article is an extension of earlier work on services innovation that compared successful firms to unsuccessful firms. Here the focus shifts from the firm to the individual innovations. Significant differences were found in the innovation level of success within the same firm for input by senior management; input by customer contact and non‐contact personnel; direct input from customers themselves; and in the amount of information used about that customer at three major stages of the development process.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Claude R. Martin Claude R. Martin Jr and David A. Horne

Reports results from in‐depth interviews with 80 senior managers in16 US‐based multinational firms and from group discussions with 388senior‐level executives from 241…

Abstract

Reports results from in‐depth interviews with 80 senior managers in 16 US‐based multinational firms and from group discussions with 388 senior‐level executives from 241 firms. The results indicate an attempt by the majority of firms to move from product dominance towards a service orientation. Identifies two major strategic hurdles: a rethinking of the client′s role as co‐producer, including measurements of client productivity; and the design and management of a new service development process. The study identifies the client productivity measurement issue as a major strategic hurdle and the authors suggest that techniques used internally (such as behaviour modification, training, and self‐motivation) be turned externally onto the client to increase productivity. The area of new service development (NSD), another significant strategic hurdle, is an emerging and relatively untouched subject. Identifies differences between new service and new product development.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Claude R. Martin Claude R. Martin Jr and David A. Horne

There is some acceptance of the idea that services and products areso intertwined that the process for development is the same, but therehas been no rigorous empirical…

Abstract

There is some acceptance of the idea that services and products are so intertwined that the process for development is the same, but there has been no rigorous empirical evidence to support that contention. Uses data collected in in‐depth interviews with 80 senior level managers in 16 different firms, 25 group discussion sessions with 388 executives in 241 additional firms, and from a mail survey of 217 senior managers in firms from 11 differing service categories. In all three phases, elements of the service innovation process were examined. Examines the general similarity to new product development and concentrates on the major factors differentiating successful from unsuccessful service innovation. Concludes that there is some similarity between product and service innovation processes, but that significant differences exist, with the service arena demonstrating more of a lack of new service strategic planning, reliance on competitive imitation for new concepts, and less presence of innovation champions. Successful firms in new service development more closely fit innovations with the current business than do unsuccessful firms. They also present more of an opportunity for a champion to stay and manage a new offering after launch. There is no apparent difference in the formality of the process between successful and unsuccessful managers, with most service firms reporting a more ad hoc process.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

David Walters and Geoffrey Nicholson

With the emergence of new social attitudes and styles over the last ten years or so, many of the more old‐established menswear retailers found themselves losing business…

Abstract

With the emergence of new social attitudes and styles over the last ten years or so, many of the more old‐established menswear retailers found themselves losing business to the trend‐setters. But Homes have built their product range on “life style”, based on a belief that the Hornes customer is an individual and not a demographic category. This article discusses the management approach of an organisation which has grown from a loosely structured family firm into a company with a 1976 turnover of more than £10m.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

David Walters and Geoffrey Nicholson

In the first part of our feature on Hornes (Jan/Feb), the authors discussed objectives, and product range policy. In this second part some of the major policy areas are…

Abstract

In the first part of our feature on Hornes (Jan/Feb), the authors discussed objectives, and product range policy. In this second part some of the major policy areas are examined in more detail: communications, customer service, and store location. There are a number of policy aspects which involve store location and policy areas discussed earlier. This demonstrates the need for a systems management approach in modern retailing — a need that Hornes clearly recognises.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Book part
Publication date: 20 June 2017

David Shinar

Abstract

Details

Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Case study
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Issam Ghazzawi, Angie Urban, Renee Horne and Claire Beswick

After completion of this case, students will be able to: define and understand the external and internal components of the strategic management process; define and explain…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

After completion of this case, students will be able to: define and understand the external and internal components of the strategic management process; define and explain various alternative strategies that help companies create a sustainable competitive advantage; understand and explain the five main choices of entry mode that are available to organisations when considering entry into a foreign market, suggest an entry mode that is relevant to Standard Bank and explain the pros and cons of each entry mode; and understand how a company can offer or phase in its service offerings.

Case overview/synopsis

This case situates Sola David-Borha, CEO for the Africa Region at the Standard Bank Group, in April 2018, considering whether and how to expand into personal and business banking in Cote d’Ivoire – a country that Standard Bank had just re-entered, having exited there in 2003 because of the civil war. The bank has operations in 20 sub-Saharan African countries and its growth strategy is focussed on Africa. This strategy is reflected in its slogan: “Africa is our home. We drive her growth”. David-Borha has a number of questions on her mind. These include: can the bank offer financial services that will meet the needs of the Ivorian people, how can the bank expand into personal a business banking – indeed is rapid expansion into this sector the right decision for now?

Complexity academic level

Advanced/graduate courses in strategic management and international business.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 5: International business.

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2016

John Horne and Dominic Malcolm

Sociology of sport in the United Kingdom is as old as the subdiscipline itself but was uniquely shaped by the prominence of football hooliganism as a major social issue in…

Abstract

Sociology of sport in the United Kingdom is as old as the subdiscipline itself but was uniquely shaped by the prominence of football hooliganism as a major social issue in the 1970s and 1980s. While it remains a somewhat niche activity, the field has been stimulated by the growing cultural centrality of sport in UK society. This quantitative and qualitative development has been recognized in recent governmental evaluations of research expertise. Current research reflects this expanded range of social stratification and social issues in sport both domestically and on a global level, while the legacy of hooligan research is evident in the continuing concentration on studies of association football. Historically, this empirical research has largely been underpinned by figurational, Marxist/neo-Marxist, or feminist sociological theories, but there is now a greater emphasis on theoretical synthesis and exploration. As a consequence of the expansion of the field, allied to its empirical and theoretical diversity, there is a burgeoning literature produced by UK sociologists of sport that spans entry-level textbooks, research monographs, and the editorship of a significant number of specialist journals. The chapter concludes by noting the future prospects of the sociology of sport in the United Kingdom in relation to teaching, research, and relations with other sport-related subdisciplines and the sociological mainstream.

Details

Sociology of Sport: A Global Subdiscipline in Review
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-050-3

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