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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2018

Hafsa Ahmed and David A. Cohen

The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding of stakeholder attributes and attitudes towards privatisation. It examines the stakeholder attributes through the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding of stakeholder attributes and attitudes towards privatisation. It examines the stakeholder attributes through the framework provided by Mitchell et al. (1997). By combining it with the concept of issue salience proposed by Bundy et al. (2013), it addresses the current gap in research on how stakeholders influence the process of privatisation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a process research approach to examine the privatisation process in New Zealand’s electricity industry in order to explore contexts, content and process of change. By collecting real-time data during the period of privatisation, utilising a process approach provided the authors a view of the historical path and associated events which lead to identification of stakeholder attributes and attitudes towards privatisation.

Findings

The research offers a unique insight into stakeholder attributes exhibited by different groups during privatisation. The authors identified that during privatisation the government is the ultimate stakeholder who sets the rules of the game of privatisation by exhibiting the attributes of power, legitimacy and urgency. The attributes exhibited by other stakeholders were transitory and were impacted by issue salience. The authors also identified that stakeholders exhibiting all three attributes (the government) chose a non-response approach to deal with any conflicting issues raised by other stakeholders.

Originality/value

The research examined the new public management emphasis on the privatisation of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) vis-à-vis stakeholder groups, utilising the complementary concepts of stakeholder salience and issue salience. This research makes a contribution to stakeholder management theory in the public sector by identifying how various stakeholders influence the process of privatisation of SOEs.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Weizhuo Wang, Christopher Gan, Zhiyou Chang, David A. Cohen and Zhaohua Li

This paper aims to develop and estimate a logit model of whether homeownership could be promoted by participation in and use of the Housing Provident Fund (HPF) program…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop and estimate a logit model of whether homeownership could be promoted by participation in and use of the Housing Provident Fund (HPF) program, with a focus on factors that influence the use of HPF loans.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops and estimates a logit model of whether homeownership could be promoted by participation in and use of the HPF program, with a focus on factors that influence the use of HPF loans.

Findings

The results show that coefficients of marital status, educational level, age, duration of employment and employer are significantly related to the use of HPF loan for homeownership.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the chosen research approach, the research results may lack generalizability.

Practical implications

The research findings provide a better understanding of homeowners’ characteristics.

Originality/value

To manage the HPF program effectively, it is important for government to have a better understanding of the underlying demand for homeownership, especially with respect to the different demographic variables and accessibility to HPF loans and the HPF.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Neil Henry Ritson, Mark M.J. Wilson and David A. Cohen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, at the industry level, the modes of governance used by multinational companies in the UK petrochemical industry to outsource…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, at the industry level, the modes of governance used by multinational companies in the UK petrochemical industry to outsource maintenance activities to engineering contractors. The study focusses on a form of novel governance structure called an Employer Panel (EP).

Design/methodology/approach

The study applies an inductive case study method to investigate the contractor governance mechanisms in 19 out of the 20 major petrochemical instillations located in the UK. Data included interviews, documentary and secondary evidence gathered from the cases and also industry bodies.

Findings

The study uncovered three distinct types of governance mode: market, managing contractor, and EP of contractors. The latter relies on the governance process of “mandated collaboration” to coordinate.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the focus on a particular industry, albeit an important one. The research implications include extending the empirical research into other sectors which use on-site contracted maintenance such as ship and aircraft manufacturing.

Practical implications

The EP structure with its mandated collaboration process is of value to managers of contractual relationships as it gives insights into coordinative process and it may provide an alternative model for managing outsourcing relationships.

Social implications

The mandated collaborative process requires clients to engage its contractors in longer term relationships, thus increasing corporate social responsibility and providing wider job security for contractor employees.

Originality/value

The EP mode, as far as can be ascertained, has not been addressed in the literature before.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Liqiong Lin, Mohamad Dian Revindo, Christopher Gan and David A. Cohen

The rapid growth of credit card use in China poses the potential for card overuse and the accumulation of increased debt. The purpose of this paper is to report on an

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid growth of credit card use in China poses the potential for card overuse and the accumulation of increased debt. The purpose of this paper is to report on an investigation into the determinants of overall credit card spending and card-financed debt by Chinese consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study focusses on two dependent variables: credit card monthly spending and card debt. The spending measure is based on consumer outlay for the month preceding the survey. Card debt is the consumers’ outstanding credit card debt when the survey was conducted. Three groups of independent measures are used: socio-demographic characteristics, card features and consumer attitude towards money. Both card spending and card debt are estimated with OLS methods. Data was obtained from the 2013 China Household Finance Survey of 1,920 households in 29 provinces and 262 counties across China that used credit cards over the survey period.

Findings

The empirical findings suggest consumers’ attitude towards money is more important in explaining card spending and debt variation than socio-demographic characteristics and card features. The credit limit set for a card, obligations to other loans and the method of paying for ordinary shopping exhibit positive effects on both card spending and card debt, while age exhibits a negative effect. Further, card spending is positively correlated with card debts, but the factors that determine card spending do not necessarily affect card debt and vice versa. Minimum card debt payments, cash advances, card tenure and interest-bearing debt have no effect on card spending but have positive effects on card debt. In addition, gender and income have opposite effects on card spending and debt.

Practical implications

The relationships we have documented suggest several actions the Chinese Government could consider dealing with credit card debt risk. Controlling the aggressive promotional campaigns that card issuers use to attract consumers and aggressive credit policies should be a focus of attention. The Chinese Government might, for example, impose minimum age and income requirements for granting credit cards and prohibit issuance of new cards to applicants who are already in debt with other types of credit. In addition, more stringent criteria to curb increases in card limits and tighter control over cash advances made on cards should be applied. Minimum payment amounts can also be increased in order to reduce credit card debt risk.

Originality/value

Despite ample documentation of consumers’ credit card behaviour, the literature is deficient in at least two areas of enquiry. First, most previous research has investigated either credit card spending behaviour or card debt, but not both. Second, with few exceptions, most research has investigated a range of specific factors that affect credit card use. In contrast, this study investigates card spending as well as card debt behaviour using a wide variety of consumer dimensions particularly relevant to credit card use and resulting debt. In addition, this study focusses on Chinese consumers, who traditionally prefer to save first and delay spending. The impact of the rapid growth of credit card use on this traditional Chinese orientation towards spending is dynamic. Documenting the influence of the individual factors examined in this study is likely to be of value to both policy makers and institutions that offer and manage credit in this changing environment.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Christopher E.C. Gan, David A. Cohen, Baiding Hu, Minh Chau Tran, Weikang Dong and Annie Wang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact that several of these factors have on a consumer’s decision to hold a credit card, as well as those involved in…

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1424

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact that several of these factors have on a consumer’s decision to hold a credit card, as well as those involved in determining the level of credit card limit.

Design/methodology/approach

Potential explanatory variables were identified in the literature, then used to build a binary logit model to test the impact of the card and consumer characteristics on credit card ownership. Data were collected via a structured interview of 409 consumers living in Hebei Province, China.

Findings

The results indicate that convenience in use, level of credit card interest rates, the application process, number of people in the household, a rewards programme, marital status, credit limit and age influence the likelihood of the respondent holding a credit card. Further, an anaylsis shows that the number of credit cards held, duration of holding a credit card, monthly credit card purchasing volume and having a degree at the tertiary level, are significantly and positively related to different levels of credit limit.

Originality/value

In summary, in order to attract more consumers to credit card use, the banks and credit card companies should consider making it more convenient for consumers to use their credit cards. Moreover, banks can increase their networking and degree of cooperation with merchants to increase the acceptance of payment by credit card. The most heavily used businesses such as supermarkets and smaller retailers, where consumers purchase goods frequently, would be good targets for banks’ attention. In addition, banks might also improve credit card reward programmes to make these more efficient and perhaps increase the size of the rewards customers can earn through card use.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Casey L. Donoho, Michael J. Polonsky, Scott Roberts and David A. Cohen

Confirms the empirical test of Hunt and Vitell’s general theory of marketing ethics by Mayo and Marks across four cultures. Uses path analysis to show the core…

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1670

Abstract

Confirms the empirical test of Hunt and Vitell’s general theory of marketing ethics by Mayo and Marks across four cultures. Uses path analysis to show the core relationships of the general theory of marketing ethics were successfully replicated using over 1,500 students from seven universities in the USA, Canada, the Netherlands, and Australia. States that tomorrow’s managers appeared to use a more deontological approach to making ethical judgements about personal selling. Extends its original research by confirming the positive relationship between the probability and the desirability of consequences. Concludes that, although the model was originally intended to explain management ethical decision making, the study shows that it may be possible to generalize as to how individuals make ethical life decisions.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Hafsa Ahmed, Michaela Balzarova and David A Cohen

The review of contemporary organisational change theories identified one theory which seemed relevant to explaining the organisational change phenomenon in public…

Abstract

Purpose

The review of contemporary organisational change theories identified one theory which seemed relevant to explaining the organisational change phenomenon in public enterprises – Van de Ven and Poole’s (1995) Evolutionary Change Theory (ECT). However, further review of the management literature revealed its limitations in explaining change, particularly in public enterprises. The theory fails to identify the triggers of change and the roles of various stakeholders, and the purpose of this paper is to enhance model of the ECT and appraise it.

Design/methodology/approach

Researchers continue to highlight the need to examine context when examining a change process; therefore, the authors utilised a process research approach to examine changes in the New Zealand electricity industry over the past four decades. As the approach is a flexible one, it allowed exploration of the critical features of change.

Findings

Analysis revealed compelling evidence of two new proposed stages to the ECT which operated in conjunction with external environmental influences that acted as stimuli for change.

Research limitations/implications

The research provided insight into the various influences on organisational change, particularly public enterprises. It confirms the previously ignored power of the external environment and the role of stakeholders in influencing organisational change.

Originality/value

The research advances current understanding of organisational change as it offers an enhanced model of the ECT by identifying the trigger for organisational change in public enterprises. Furthermore, it finds different stakeholder groups with the ability to influence the organisational change process.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Christopher Gan, Baiding Hu, Cindy Gao, Betty Kao and David A. Cohen

This paper seeks to investigate the impact of socioeconomic factors of homebuyers such as gender, age, marital status, education, economic status and race on home…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to investigate the impact of socioeconomic factors of homebuyers such as gender, age, marital status, education, economic status and race on home ownership and loan decisions in urban China.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs logistic regression to investigate the socioeconomic factors affecting the consumers' house purchase decision in urban China and the factors affecting the housing loan application.

Findings

Using a structured questionnaire to collect relevant data from household residents (both homeowners and non-home owners) in Nanjing in 2010, the findings document that male respondents who are non-minorities and have higher levels of education are more likely to purchase a house. The results also show that race, educational attainment, size of household and credit card ownership are significantly related to rejection for a housing loan.

Research limitations/implications

The findings in this paper provide homebuyers with a better understanding of factors affecting the housing loans and their decision to purchase a house. Homebuyers can accurately assess their financial ability and improve the use of their credit to purchase a house. In addition, Chinese homebuyers should be encouraged to save since savings serve as a step in building their credit worthiness; therefore, their accessibility to housing loans can be improved and the rate of homeownership will be increased as well.

Originality/value

This research would benefit both lender and borrowers. The research findings provide banks with a better understanding of homebuyers' characteristics that influence their accessibilities to housing loans. Homeownership requires affordable housing financing. Banks should consider repackaging their home loan products to make them more attractive to those with limited means. Such products should focus on making loans more affordable in real terms. First-time homebuyers are almost always young and earn low incomes.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Abel Alonso, Rick A. Fraser and David A. Cohen

Since the early 1990s, New Zealand's wine industry has experienced significant growth, including the much larger volume of grapes being produced, more wineries being open…

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1272

Abstract

Purpose

Since the early 1990s, New Zealand's wine industry has experienced significant growth, including the much larger volume of grapes being produced, more wineries being open to the public and more wines being exported. However, this growth has not been accompanied by published academic research on topics related to the wine industry, such as wine tourism. This paper aims to report the findings of a study conducted in New Zealand wineries that investigated differences between domestic and international winery visitors on characteristics related to their winery experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The study focuses on the ways in which different winery visitor groups may differ, or whether relationships exist between these.

Findings

The results indicate that there may well be differences between these two groups in several dimensions, including their winery expenditures.

Originality/value

While some sampling aspects reduce the generalisability of the results, the findings may have useful implications for the wine and wine tourism industries, and might be beneficial for wineries in their efforts to provide a more valuable experience for wine tourists.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2007

Abel D. Alonso, Rick A. Fraser and David A. Cohen

To investigate differences among winery visitors of different age groups in New Zealand, as well as the commercial potential of these groups.

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1100

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate differences among winery visitors of different age groups in New Zealand, as well as the commercial potential of these groups.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was designed to obtain information of winery visitors, including demographic characteristics and their expenditure at the winery. A total of 43 wineries located in all wine regions of New Zealand accepted the invitation to participate in this study by distributing questionnaires in their facilities. In all, 609 usable responses were obtained.

Findings

The study provides information about winery visitors in New Zealand, and confirms clear differences among different age groups in several dimensions, including their winery expenditures.

Research limitations/implications

One potential limitation is that because several participating wineries were much larger in physical size and restaurant seating, the percentage of responses obtained in this study might have been disproportionately large, or unrepresentatively small.

Practical implications

The overall findings may have significant implications for the wine and wine tourism industries, and might be beneficial for wineries in their efforts of providing a more valuable experience for wine tourists.

Originality/value

This exploratory study provides new and practical insights of the winery experience in the New Zealand context, an area where very limited research has been conducted.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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