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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Julia Becker, David Johnston, Heather Lazrus, George Crawford and Dave Nelson

The purpose of this paper is to explore a case study in Washington State, USA where traditional stories (“oral tradition”) are being used in a contemporary context…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a case study in Washington State, USA where traditional stories (“oral tradition”) are being used in a contemporary context. Traditional knowledge is a system of experiential knowledge acquired through the continual observation of and interaction with the environment. This form of knowledge is still held by many societies and can provide an important contribution in emergency management for natural hazards. Those holding traditional knowledge can assist in understanding the nature of local hazards, suggest appropriate risk reduction and response mechanisms, and even give options for recovery based on past experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first discusses the nature of traditional knowledge and how it can contribute to emergency management. It then goes on to investigate a particular case study where a traditional Native American story has been combined with contemporary methods of hazard mitigation to create an educational video for tsunami hazard.

Findings

Traditional knowledge can be used effectively to undertake hazard education and enhance response to warnings. The video, titled “Run to Higher Ground!”, is an example of this, and has been readily taken up by indigenous communities and the general population (both in the USA and internationally) as an educational tool.

Originality/value

The paper will be of value to those working within the emergency management sector, and is particularly useful for communities who need to respond to warnings.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Jim Maxon

In order to create new ideas, Hewlett‐Packard firstly identified the true innovators, entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs, and secondly created a climate in which they could flourish.

Abstract

In order to create new ideas, Hewlett‐Packard firstly identified the true innovators, entrepreneurs and intrapreneurs, and secondly created a climate in which they could flourish.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1986

Jim Maxon

Innovation Teams (“I” Teams) In mid‐1985 managers at Hewlett‐Packard's Queensferry Microwave Operation (QMO), near Edinburgh, reviewed the development of QMO during 1984…

Abstract

Innovation Teams (“I” Teams) In mid‐1985 managers at Hewlett‐Packard's Queensferry Microwave Operation (QMO), near Edinburgh, reviewed the development of QMO during 1984 and 1985 and projected the objectives and strategies for 1986–1988.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Mordecai Lee

This exploration of management history focuses on mass entertainment media to determine the history of the efficiency expert in popular culture. It reviews the history of…

2609

Abstract

This exploration of management history focuses on mass entertainment media to determine the history of the efficiency expert in popular culture. It reviews the history of the image of the efficiency expert in film and on American‐produced television programs. The review shows that this profession is a universal and pervasive one, permanently embedded in our culture and catholic in background, occupation and workplace. It is generally a man’s job. The most significant historical trend is a sharp change from the efficiency expert as an amusing and relatively harmless character to a malevolent one who is to be feared. Although television has only existed for about half as long as motion pictures, the depiction of the efficiency expert on TV is similar to his movie image. This widely recognized profession needs no introduction to the viewer. He is a negative figure, often laughed at but never admired.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 40 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Stanley E. Fawcett, Amydee M. Fawcett, August Michael Knemeyer, Sebastian Brockhaus and G. Scott Webb

Despite over 30 years of focus on supply chain collaboration, companies continue to struggle to achieve collaborative advantage. To better understand why some companies…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite over 30 years of focus on supply chain collaboration, companies continue to struggle to achieve collaborative advantage. To better understand why some companies are able to collaborate for competitive advantage and others can't, the authors explore how managerial commitment enables collaborative capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a longitudinal inductive study, interviewing companies with reputations for intense supply chain collaboration at four different times over 20 years.

Findings

The authors identified managerial commitment as a super-ordinate enabler. They describe the dynamics of commitment development and explore three types of commitment: instrumental, normative and transformative. The authors document key antecedents and outcomes of each type of commitment.

Research limitations/implications

Theory regarding the antecedents to commitment to collaborative capability is underdeveloped. The authors elaborate these antecedents and the dynamics that enable or undermine the commitment necessary to build effective collaboration capabilities.

Practical implications

The authors provide insight (i.e. a practical and actionable roadmap) into the process companies use to cultivate commitment to collaboration and value co-creation.

Originality/value

Collaboration is critical to value co-creation, including effective supply chain risk mitigation and lasting sustainability efforts. The authors elaborate a theory of commitment dynamics that explains why most companies never go beyond basic levels of collaboration. At the same time, the authors provide a roadmap for deep, transformative collaboration.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Stanley E. Fawcett, Yao Henry Jin, Amydee M. Fawcett and Gregory Magnan

Trust has long been viewed as a potential governance mechanism. However, recent research discloses substantive incongruities in trust conceptualization and…

1810

Abstract

Purpose

Trust has long been viewed as a potential governance mechanism. However, recent research discloses substantive incongruities in trust conceptualization and operationalization – especially in the supply chain buyer/supplier context. The purpose of this paper is to develop an empirically grounded conceptualization of trust and to explore the trust-construction process.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used the communications rationality approach to elaborate a three-stage qualitative study of supply chain trust. The authors first monologically examine trust by interviewing managers from over 50 companies (as described). The list of trust behaviors are then dialogically refined through 11 focus studies comprised of over 250 managers into different trust dimensions (as agreed upon). Finally, the authors used two in-depth, dyadic case studies to examine the dynamic trust construction process (as witnessed).

Findings

The authors find divergence in the way academics define trust and the way companies operationalize trust. Missing in action is the notion of benevolence. In the supply chain setting, managers describe trust as consisting of credibility and relationship commitment. Companies use an iterative approach to signal trustworthiness. However, ambiguity increases the costs and decreases the effectiveness of proactive trust construction as a form of supply chain governance.

Originality/value

The authors specify and evaluate novel constructs used to signal trustworthiness and document why and how companies struggle to use the signaling process efficiently and effectively. For some, this is an issue of managerial commitment. For others, this represents a lack of understanding of trustworthiness signals and the trust-construction process. Ultimately, the authors develop a more robust conceptualization of inter-organizational trust and present a roadmap for proactive trust construction.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Nancy Melin Nelson

A special track, sponsored by OCLC Micro magazine, has been added to the annual Computers in Libraries Conferences. Convened by Dan Marmion, editor of OCLC Micro, the…

Abstract

A special track, sponsored by OCLC Micro magazine, has been added to the annual Computers in Libraries Conferences. Convened by Dan Marmion, editor of OCLC Micro, the track has been planned by Dave Brunell, executive director of Bibliographical Center for Research (BCR).

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Paul A. Pautler

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the…

Abstract

The Bureau of Economics in the Federal Trade Commission has a three-part role in the Agency and the strength of its functions changed over time depending on the preferences and ideology of the FTC’s leaders, developments in the field of economics, and the tenor of the times. The over-riding current role is to provide well considered, unbiased economic advice regarding antitrust and consumer protection law enforcement cases to the legal staff and the Commission. The second role, which long ago was primary, is to provide reports on investigations of various industries to the public and public officials. This role was more recently called research or “policy R&D”. A third role is to advocate for competition and markets both domestically and internationally. As a practical matter, the provision of economic advice to the FTC and to the legal staff has required that the economists wear “two hats,” helping the legal staff investigate cases and provide evidence to support law enforcement cases while also providing advice to the legal bureaus and to the Commission on which cases to pursue (thus providing “a second set of eyes” to evaluate cases). There is sometimes a tension in those functions because building a case is not the same as evaluating a case. Economists and the Bureau of Economics have provided such services to the FTC for over 100 years proving that a sub-organization can survive while playing roles that sometimes conflict. Such a life is not, however, always easy or fun.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

David W. Nelson

The value of newspaper indexes in libraries is a topic that few public services librarians would be willing to debate on the negative team. Most large and mid‐size…

Abstract

The value of newspaper indexes in libraries is a topic that few public services librarians would be willing to debate on the negative team. Most large and mid‐size libraries, and many small ones, subscribe to indexes of major dailies such as the New York Times or the Christian Science Monitor. Recent advances in computer technology have not only made these indexes more efficient to publish, but have also made online access to full‐text newspaper databases possible. However, access to the contents of local or regional newspapers is often more important to the typical library user than indexed information carried in the national press, with the possible exception of Dave Barry's column.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

M.S. Rao

The purpose of this paper is to explore a new leadership style – “soft leadership” – which is needed in a interconnected, global, and technocratic world.

8112

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a new leadership style – “soft leadership” – which is needed in a interconnected, global, and technocratic world.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a combination of research into a new leadership style with a question and answer session during an International Leadership Association (ILA) webinar.

Findings

The paper discovers how the soft leaders adopt tools such as influence, persuasion, negotiation, appreciation, motivation, and collaboration for the collective good. It explains how soft leadership is different from other leadership styles. It describes the significance of soft leadership and differentiates between soft and hard leadership through examples. It substantiates with Dave Ulrich's Leadership Code. It provides the questions posed by participants during the webinar organized by International Leadership Association (ILA) with answers. It calls upon readers to consider how leadership insights acquired from this manuscript may be applied individually and organizationally to make a difference in the lives of others.

Originality/value

The 11 C's that collectively constitute soft leadership is a unique concept. Globally renowned management guru, Dave Ulrich mapped 11 C's into a leadership code on the author's request which added value to this new concept. Participation of international leadership experts and their questions during the ILA webinar with the author's spontaneous answers further enriched this concept.

1 – 10 of 219