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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Dave Miles and Kevin Doughty

This paper aims to demonstrate the need for telecare service providers to broaden their horizons in order to offer an extended range of service options when considering…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the need for telecare service providers to broaden their horizons in order to offer an extended range of service options when considering the holistic needs of vulnerable people who wish to remain independent in the community.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the processes involved in establishing a telecare service to include the provision of all forms of assistive technologies including aids and adaptations and elements of standalone telecare, which are particularly relevant to families of people with learning disabilities. The work includes a review of a survey of local authorities which demonstrates a clear expansion of AT provision.

Findings

The Nottingham model of assisted living provider services is proposed as an example of how home improvements, community equipment and telecare/health services may be integrated.

Originality/value

The implications of these changes are discussed in the context of additional resources needed for improved prescribing, installation and support.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Chris Abbott

Abstract

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2014

Elina Ibrayeva and Terrence Sebora

Cutts Floral Distributors, founded in 2004 by Dave Lambe, was a floral wholesaler in Lincoln, Nebraska. The firm became a top wholesaler in the Lincoln area and had…

Abstract

Case description

Cutts Floral Distributors, founded in 2004 by Dave Lambe, was a floral wholesaler in Lincoln, Nebraska. The firm became a top wholesaler in the Lincoln area and had expanded its delivery range (all accessed by the company's hand delivery system) up to 100 miles outside of Lincoln. The company credited its success to the expertise of its founder, a professor of horticultural entrepreneurship, and to the company's commitment to customer service. Dave Lambe came to believe that Cutts had exhausted the local market and began looking for growth opportunities within driving distance. Proposed locations for expansion included Kansas City (MO/KS), Denver (CO), and St Joseph (MO). The case provides an in-depth look at Cutts, its competitive advantages, and strategy as the firm faced a critical decision, made more difficult by the uncertainties of the economic recession. This case encourages students to think critically in order to answer the case's central questions: “Should Cutts expand? If so, where?” The complexity of an expansion decision and the multitude of factors that may influence an entrepreneur's decision to expand are illustrated throughout the case.

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2007

Tom McManus and Dave Delaney

The purpose of this paper is to convey useful and practical advice on one's development as a manager from the perspective of a successful entrepreneur.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to convey useful and practical advice on one's development as a manager from the perspective of a successful entrepreneur.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on lessons learned from founding and leading a $300 million business.

Findings

Beware of the transition from school to business. Take jobs that offer real experience. Showing up is 90 percent of the battle. If you are not in a job that you consider to be as much fun as what you do when you are not working, then you should go and try to find that job. The best decisions you make will be the mistakes you avoid. If it doesn't make sense it can't last. When you are explaining you are losing. Hire people who care. Break down barriers to communication. Embrace humor. You can't lead when your pants are too tight. Never ignore the last mile problem. Big egos destroy companies.

Originality/value

Valuable for managers at every stage of their development, and especially for those just entering the work force.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Drew Martin and Arch G. Woodside

The purpose of this paper is to describe theory building and testing of dual processing of tourist reasoning, judgment, and actions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe theory building and testing of dual processing of tourist reasoning, judgment, and actions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies micro‐tipping point theory and qualitative comparative analysis, using case study data.

Findings

Maps of the reasoning, judgments, and actions of five parties of tourist buying major services support dual‐processing theory of deciding on destination choices.

Research limitations/implications

This report does not include the attempt to generalize the findings to large survey samples of informants.

Practical implications

Executives need to go beyond recognizing that what tourists report consciously may differ substantially from what they think unconsciously and to plan on collecting data on both dual processing modes of thinking.

Originality/value

This paper breaks new ground in applying dual‐processing theory in tourist behavior of buying major tourist services.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Loic Pengtao Li, Biljana Juric and Roderick J. Brodie

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamic process of multi-actor engagement by examining how it evolves and spreads in actor networks. The authors challenge the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamic process of multi-actor engagement by examining how it evolves and spreads in actor networks. The authors challenge the dyadic perspective adopted by previous research.

Design/methodology/approach

An abductive theorizing approach uses a longitudinal case study to develop a theoretical framework of the iterative process of multi-actor engagement. The authors draw on the contemporary literature on engagement, service-dominant logic and value propositions.

Findings

The research shows that engagement conditions, via actors’ appraisals, lead to engagement properties and result in engagement outcomes as the new conditions for the next iteration. Changes within this multi-actor engagement process lead the network to evolve over time.

Research limitations/implications

The authors highlight the importance of adopting a dynamic multi-actor perspective of engagement and provide foundations for further research. The use of longitudinal methods that focus on the groups of actors in the evolving network is a key consideration.

Practical implications

There is the need to understand and measure the dynamic process of engagement among different groups of actors within networks in the service context.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to explore the dynamics of engagement among multiple actors in the network. This leads to the expansion of Storbacka et al.’s (2016) conceptual work by identifying the iterative nature of the multi-actor engagement process, and new components in the process (i.e. actors’ connections, value propositions and engagement outcomes), as well as clarifying existing ones (e.g. engagement properties and actors’ appraisals).

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Decolonising Sambo: Transculturation, Fungibility and Black and People of Colour Futurity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-347-1

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Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Irene H. Yoon and Annie Barton

In empirical research and practitioner guides, turnaround processes tend to be described in terms of discrete stages and strategies. Though necessary, this…

Abstract

Purpose

In empirical research and practitioner guides, turnaround processes tend to be described in terms of discrete stages and strategies. Though necessary, this characterization belies the twists and turns of turnaround leadership. The purpose of this paper is to expand the assumptions of how turnaround proceeds in linear chronos time with the sensibilities of kairos time or the “right” time for turnaround leadership moves.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is an exploratory qualitative multi-case study with principals and their key supports (assistant principals, district leaders, teacher leaders) in four public turnaround schools. The grounded theory analysis conceptualizes the experiences of turnaround principals in flexible, complex ways.

Findings

The findings begin with a metaphor and definition of “shifting gears” at chronos and kairos times that emphasizes how turnaround principals make adaptive, agentic adjustments when moving forward through changing terrain. The second half of findings describes each principal’s experiences and reflections on their discernment of the right times for change within a chronological trajectory of turnaround. In addition, the leaders described shifting gears as strategic and responsive to contexts, sometimes taking a psychological toll.

Originality/value

Expanding notions of time in turnaround re-centers turnaround leaders as engaging in intellectually and emotionally demanding work. Such recognition challenges future research to address experiences and emotions in dynamic contexts. Hence, with this study, preparation programs and state and local systems may adjust holistic supports and leadership pipelines to sustain turnaround leaders.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Colin G. Pooley, Dave Horton, Griet Scheldeman, Miles Tight, Helen Harwatt, Ann Jopson, Tim Jones, Alison Chisholm and Caroline Mullen

Purpose – To examine the potential for switching short trips in urban areas from cars to walking and cycling, and the possible contribution, this could make to a reduction…

Abstract

Purpose – To examine the potential for switching short trips in urban areas from cars to walking and cycling, and the possible contribution, this could make to a reduction in transport-related greenhouse gas emissions.

Methods – Case studies in four urban areas combining a questionnaire survey, interviews with households and during journeys and in-depth ethnographies of everyday travel.

Findings – The barriers to an increase in walking and cycling in British urban areas are emphasised. It demonstrates that motivations for walking and cycling are mostly personal (health and local environment) and that the complexities and contingencies of everyday travel for many households, combined with inadequate infrastructure, safety concerns and the fact that walking and cycling are seen by many as abnormal modes of travel, mean that increasing rates of walking and cycling will be hard. Given that the contribution of trips less than 2 miles to transport-related greenhouse gas emissions is relatively small, it is argued that any gains from increased walking and cycling would mostly accrue to personal health and the local environment rather than to the UK's carbon reduction target.

Social implications – Positive attitudes towards walking and cycling are motivated mainly by personal concerns rather than global environmental issues.

Originality – Use of detailed ethnographic material in policy-related transport research.

Details

Transport and Climate Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-440-5

Keywords

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