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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Mark Chandley, Maxine Cromar-Hayes, Dave Mercer, Bridget Clancy, Iain Wilkie and Gary Thorpe

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of patients detained in one UK high-security hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising a qualitative, action research, methodology the aim was to involve forensic mental health nurses in a collaborative, client-centred approach to identification and resolution of dilemmas in the process of planning care for offender-patients.

Findings

In this context the authors identify constraints and contradictions involved in employing recovery principles in institutions critics refer to as part of the disciplinary apparatus of psychiatric and social control; where the taken for granted lives, and relations, of an incarcerated population are measured by the calendar, not the clock.

Research limitations/implications

Protective practices remain highly relevant in high-secure practice. Safety, an important value for all can by and large be achieved through recovery approaches. The humanistic elements of recovery can offer up safe and useful methods of deploying the mental health nurse on the ward. Many nurses have the prerequisite approach but there remains a wide scope to enhance those skills. Many see the approach as axiomatic though nurse education often prepares nurses with a biomedical view of the ward.

Practical implications

Currently, philosophical tenets of recovery are enshrined in contemporary health policy and professional directives but, as yet, have not been translated into high-secure settings. Drawing on preliminary findings, attention is given to the value of socially situated approaches in challenging historic dominance of a medical model.

Social implications

It is concluded that recovery could be a forerunner of reforms necessary for the continued relevance of high-secure care into the twenty-first century.

Originality/value

This research is located in high-secure setting. The social situation is marked by the extent of the isolation involved. A value is in this situation. First it is akin to the isolation of the tribe utilised by many anthropologists for their ability to adopt the “social laboratory” status to test out theories of behaviour in industrial society. The authors urge others to utilise this research in this way. Second, the situation represents the locus of so many of societies dilemmas, paradoxes and fears that moral issues morph from what is the mundane in wider society. In this way humanistic approaches are tested via action research with nurses in some rigouous ways.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Dave Mercer, Heidi Kenworthy and Ian Pierce-Hayes

“Inclusivity” and “empowerment” are central concepts in the philosophy of nursing practice and education. Recent professional concern has focused on the need to embed…

Abstract

Purpose

“Inclusivity” and “empowerment” are central concepts in the philosophy of nursing practice and education. Recent professional concern has focused on the need to embed compassion in healthcare cultures where practice contributes to learning. The purpose of this paper is to explore an innovative partnership approach to undergraduate placement provision for adult-general nursing students in the context of learning disability and mental health.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical discussion focuses on evaluation of a non-clinical placement centred on the health and social care of individuals with a learning disability or mental health needs. Two projects from practice around healthy living and hate crime illustrated the value of transformative learning as a pedagogic philosophy.

Findings

Student feedback offered insight into social and cultural processes that impact on practice-based learning, and factors promoting inclusive engagement. Such included the context of identity formation, narrative as an evidence-base for caring, and personal/emotional growth through critical reflection.

Practical implications

Evaluation provided a platform to re-think model(s) of clinical practice learning in healthcare education derived from a non-clinical placement. There are tangible benefits for sustaining value-led practice at a time of political change in the way health services are configured and delivered.

Social implications

When engagement with the principles of inclusivity and empowerment become part of the lived-experience of the nursing student, longer-term recognition and retention of caring, and enabling values are more likely to endure.

Originality/value

The emotional development and skills acquired by nursing students transfer to all branches of the profession by revitalising core conditions of compassion, respect, dignity, and humanity.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Mick McKeown, Martin Hinks, Mark Stowell‐Smith, Dave Mercer and Joe Forster

The results of a Q methodological study of professional understandings of the notion of risk in mental health services within the UK are discussed in relation to the…

Abstract

The results of a Q methodological study of professional understandings of the notion of risk in mental health services within the UK are discussed in relation to the relevance for staff training and quality assurance. The study attempted to access the diversity of understandings of risk issues amongst a multi‐professional group of staff (n = 60) attending inter‐agency risk training workshops in 1998. Q methodology is presented as both an appropriate means for such inquiry and as a novel experiential technique for training purposes. A tentative argument is advanced that the qualitative accounts generated by Q research could assist in systematic reviews of quality, complementing the singularly quantitative approaches typically represented in the audit process.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Abstract

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Content available

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2018

Abstract

Details

The Evolution of Goth Culture: The Origins and Deeds of the New Goths
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-677-8

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Book part
Publication date: 3 August 2018

Karl Spracklen and Beverley Spracklen

Abstract

Details

The Evolution of Goth Culture: The Origins and Deeds of the New Goths
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-677-8

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Abstract

Details

The Evolution of Goth Culture: The Origins and Deeds of the New Goths
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-677-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Dave Doyle and Michelle Cornes

In this article we draw on ‘practice wisdom’ to reflect on the development of interprofessional partnerships for older people in a metropolitan borough in North West…

Abstract

In this article we draw on ‘practice wisdom’ to reflect on the development of interprofessional partnerships for older people in a metropolitan borough in North West England. We suggest that most interprofessional partnership working continues to sit outside mainstream services, and that integration and seamless service remain a significant challenge. We focus on local plans for service reconfiguration (‘Go Integral’) and their likely implications for non‐traditional services such as intermediate care and falls prevention. Finally, we show how social care and social work values can be used to glue the system together so that it becomes easily accessible and meaningful to older people.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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