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Article

Dave Lewis

Deals with the identification of foreign objects found in food.Explains the importance of tracing the origins of these complaints andidentifies the likely sources. Uses…

Abstract

Deals with the identification of foreign objects found in food. Explains the importance of tracing the origins of these complaints and identifies the likely sources. Uses microscopy‐based methods illustrated by photomicrographs of characteristic features.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 92 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

In Spring this year Birmingham City Council in the UK became the latest winner of the British Telecom lifelong learning education awards. Aiming to assist one of society’s…

Abstract

In Spring this year Birmingham City Council in the UK became the latest winner of the British Telecom lifelong learning education awards. Aiming to assist one of society’s most neglected groups, the council’s “e‐street” initiative intends to bring basic skills training through computers to homeless people. The £75,000 first prize goes a long way to highlight the increasing importance many institutions place on the concept of lifelong learning. The European Council defines lifelong learning as “learning activities carried out at any time in life and in a wide range of environments, undertaken with a view to improving knowledge and skills.”

Details

Training Strategies for Tomorrow, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1369-7234

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Article

Jodie Ferguson, Brian Brown and D. Eric Boyd

The purpose of this paper is to consider corporate social irresponsibility (CSI) within the supply chain. The discussion focuses on the social component of social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider corporate social irresponsibility (CSI) within the supply chain. The discussion focuses on the social component of social responsibility and explores its effects on end-users. Moreover, this paper presents moral intensity, a construct introduced in the ethics literature, as a potential guide to managers who struggle to navigate the gray area between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and CSI.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conceptualizes CSI within the supply chain and offers a framework and propositions for understanding and preventing irresponsible behavior from a moral intensity perspective.

Findings

The moral intensity framework provides a normative approach with the potential to guide managers who face choices involving decisions that might lead to irresponsible behavior in interorganizational settings.

Originality/value

This paper draws attention to business-to-business CSI and the limited research that focuses on the social aspects of CSR, rather than the environmental and economic factors emphasized in prior research. It also introduces the moral intensity framework to the supply chain literature and highlights the end-user’s (i.e. consumer’s) role in influencing the performance of the overall value chain.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part

Leigh Sparks

The UK is a developed retail economy with some of the largest and most powerful retailers in the world. These retailers have been attempting to offer sustainable…

Abstract

The UK is a developed retail economy with some of the largest and most powerful retailers in the world. These retailers have been attempting to offer sustainable distribution, both for consumer focus reasons and as an aid to performance. At the other end of the scale, small local community focused stores have begun to emerge to offer an alternative food supply to that of the major chains. They too argue for a focus on sustainability but from a very different perspective. This chapter explores these varying approaches, using the contrasts to develop a discussion about sustainable distribution in the UK.

Details

Food Retailing and Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-554-2

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Article

Bronwyn Howell and Carolyn Cordery

Policy reforms to primary health care delivery in New Zealand required government-funded firms overseeing care delivery to be constituted as nonprofit entities with…

Abstract

Policy reforms to primary health care delivery in New Zealand required government-funded firms overseeing care delivery to be constituted as nonprofit entities with governance shared between consumers and producers. This paper examines the consumer and producer interests in these firmsʼ allocation of ownership and control utilising theories of competition. Consistent with pre-reform patterns of ownership and control, provider interests appear to have exerted effective control over these entitiesʼ formation and governance in all but a few cases where community (consumer) control pre-existed. Their ability to do so is implied from the absence of a defined ownership stake and the changes to incentives facing the different stakeholding groups. It appears that the pre-existing patterns will prevail and further intervention will be required if policy-makers are to achieve their underlying aims.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Case study

Donald L. Lester

This case demonstrates the difficulties encountered by small family businesses when the founder passes away without having properly prepared for succession. AAA…

Abstract

This case demonstrates the difficulties encountered by small family businesses when the founder passes away without having properly prepared for succession. AAA Construction was a company held together for over thirty-six years by a family patriarch, Jack Hudson. His choice of his grandson to succeed him was obvious. However, there were serious questions about whether David Robbins up to the task.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article

Sally Brown

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the experiences of conducting focus groups amongst acquaintances in naturally occurring settings, where participants were known…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the experiences of conducting focus groups amongst acquaintances in naturally occurring settings, where participants were known to each other and participation was less about being recruited, and more about being there when the focus group took place.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a qualitative study of multi-generational experiences of teenage parenting, and used interviews and focus groups. The study took an ethnographic approach, using case studies with a small number (4) of families, plus supplementary interviews, and focus groups with teenage parents and parents-to-be.

Findings

Using focus groups in naturally occurring settings alongside other qualitative data collection affords insights into the research topic that would not otherwise be available.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the challenges and benefits of using naturally occurring groups, and reflects on the way the findings from these groups illuminated aspects of the study concerning relationships. It argues that naturally occurring groups have advantages over conventionally organised focus groups that contribute to a deeper understanding of relationships between members.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article

Alan Dean

The reasons why some people use illicit drugs recreationally and in a dependent, harmful, way are not clearly understood. Various factors have been put forward, each of…

Abstract

The reasons why some people use illicit drugs recreationally and in a dependent, harmful, way are not clearly understood. Various factors have been put forward, each of which may play some part in affecting individual drug using outcomes. Rounsaville (1982), for example, analysed the life records of approximately 400 opiate users and identified two antecedents to drug use, childhood trauma and early antisocial or delinquent behaviour. Social background and deprivation have also been noted as possible preceding factors. Parker et al (1987) found correlations between heroin use and unemployment, overcrowding and other indices of deprivation. Other perspectives on use, cited by Johns (1990), include availability and peer influence. Sub‐culture has also been suggested as an important context to use (Becker, 1963; Williams, 1989). The Third Triennial Report to Congress (Department of Health and Public Service, 1991) focused on individual ‘risks’, which were categorised as biological (genetic), psychological, behavioural (anti‐social and delinquent activies), demographic (such as gender or ethnic factors), and environmental (arising from family or peer group influence). However, despite these and many other perspectives on pathways to illicit drug use and drug‐related harm, a comprehensive account which seeks to ground such practices in the complex interplay between the individual, their community and elements of social structure has yet to be achieved.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 15 no. 1/2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Frederick R. Post and Rebecca J. Bennett

To speak of collective bargaining as a collaborative process seems a contradiction. Since 1935 when collective bargaining was institutional‐ized in the Wagner Act, the…

Abstract

To speak of collective bargaining as a collaborative process seems a contradiction. Since 1935 when collective bargaining was institutional‐ized in the Wagner Act, the process has assumed that the disputing par‐ties are enemies, competing for scarce resources with different objec‐tives. This article explains the implementation of a new theory of col‐lective bargaining which encourages truthfulness, candor, and the acknowledgement of shared goals and avoids the negative and self‐defeating power plays of the adversarial collective bargaining process. As a result of this process, grievances in the observed company declined from 40 per year under previous contracts, to 2 in 18 months under the current contract; anger and hostility have been nearly eliminated; and there is a real spirit of cooperation present in the plant.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article

Gustavo Quiroga Souki, Luiz Marcelo Antonialli, Álvaro Alexandre da Silveira Barbosa and Alessandro Silva Oliveira

À la carte restaurants have faced increasing challenges in meeting the needs and desires of new food consumers. The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model…

Abstract

Purpose

À la carte restaurants have faced increasing challenges in meeting the needs and desires of new food consumers. The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model for evaluating the consumers’ perceived quality of à la carte restaurants and to review the impact on their attitudes and behavioural intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted with 508 university students in Brazil, and the data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The results showed that global perceived quality (GPQ), which is a multidimensional construct with nine dimensions, directly impacted emotions, the satisfaction and perceived value by consumers. This satisfaction positively affected word-of-mouth (WOM) communication and the propensity for loyalty. Price did not have a statistically significant impact on customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper, based on the structural model herein proposed and tested, is the most complete of all available articles in the literature about à la carte restaurants, as this study contemplates a greater number of perceived quality factors. In addition, both tangible and intangible perceived quality factors were included in this tested model, which goes beyond what is typically contemplated in other such. Moreover, none of the existing articles in the existing literature simultaneously observed the relationship between perceived quality, positive and negative emotions, price, perceived value, satisfaction, WOM communication and propensity to loyalty. Finally, the questionnaire developed in this study could be used both by academics in future studies and by restaurant managers.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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