Search results

1 – 10 of 192
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Mike Woodcock and Dave Francis

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Bertus de Jager, Chris Minnie, Johan de Jager, Marita Welgemoed, John Bessant and Dave Francis

Widespread recognition of the strategic imperative posed by a turbulent external environment has brought into focus a key challenge for firms – that of increasing…

Abstract

Widespread recognition of the strategic imperative posed by a turbulent external environment has brought into focus a key challenge for firms – that of increasing involvement in innovation by the staff in the organisation. Much research has suggested that organisations that mobilise a large proportion of their staff to participate in innovation can make significant gains. Achieving this depends on a systematic process of organisational development in which the facilitative patterns of behavioural routines are extended and reinforced, so that they become a major culture change. This paper reports on progress with this organisational development methodology using a detailed case study of its use within a major mining company in South Africa. It makes use of a reference model framework to help structure and direct the change process towards enabling higher involvement in innovation. In particular it explores practical issues involved in moving a large organisation along a path of high involvement innovation.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Philip R. Harris and Dorothy L. Harris

Successful management not only actively promotes team spirit, butinstalls the mechanisms and the means to develop team skills and toenhance team roles. Today′s managers…

Abstract

Successful management not only actively promotes team spirit, but installs the mechanisms and the means to develop team skills and to enhance team roles. Today′s managers are challenged to make a transition from the traditional way of operating or doing business, to experimenting with new styles of organising and managing.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Jim Butler

Learning by doing is not the sole process of learning for managers. Experiential work on programmes can be improved if the opportunity is offered of going through all…

Abstract

Learning by doing is not the sole process of learning for managers. Experiential work on programmes can be improved if the opportunity is offered of going through all aspects of the learning cycle. Deliberate analysis of learning situations and managerial and learning preferences can be productive of extra learning. Use of instruments designed by Belbin, Saville and Holdsworth, Honey and Mumford, and Schein is described, with interesting case examples taken from a BAT Industries' management development programme.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1987

THERE ARE WOMEN engineers in every facet of that ubiquitous motley of professions that claim (sometimes with but little justification) to that title. There are, too, women…

Abstract

THERE ARE WOMEN engineers in every facet of that ubiquitous motley of professions that claim (sometimes with but little justification) to that title. There are, too, women politicians, women surgeons and physicians, women accountants, architects and one was recently appointed as Editor of a national newspaper.

Details

Work Study, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Nina Schuller

This paper argues that there is a tendency towards over simplification in community safety planning, which currently presents inadequate models to respond to the…

Abstract

This paper argues that there is a tendency towards over simplification in community safety planning, which currently presents inadequate models to respond to the complexity of change in dynamic urban environments with naturally transient populations. Drawing upon environmental and health planning models, a responsive, flexible impact assessment approach is described and proposed.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

Mike Pedler

The first three articles have been concerned with the substance, the conceptual context and the skills of negotiating. This final section is devoted to the ways and means…

Abstract

The first three articles have been concerned with the substance, the conceptual context and the skills of negotiating. This final section is devoted to the ways and means of learning how to negotiate. Some relevant ideas on learning are discussed and a number of resources are listed to help those who are designing programmes in this area.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Philip R. Harris and Kevin G. Harris

Points out that, if high performance is to be sustained in metal‐industrial organizations, co‐operative action among personnel becomes essential ‐ the explosion of…

Abstract

Points out that, if high performance is to be sustained in metal‐industrial organizations, co‐operative action among personnel becomes essential ‐ the explosion of information today and the complexity of our times demand it. Maintains that team management, then, is vital to achieve and maintain high output at a time of fast growth. Stresses that thinking managers must be committed to learning the skills of group dynamics, including how to influence team processes and activities, norms and values, and task and maintenance functions. Discusses group leadership which implies clarifying roles and relationships; sharing of unique talents and decision making; and acquiring new tools such as the computer to control the diverse elements involved in matrix, project or product management. Discusses the creation of an effective team culture which improves performance beyond the sum of individual member efforts. Suggests that behavioural scientists can provide team building to ensure group productiveness and synergy. Determines that successful management actively not only promotes a team spirit, but installs team mechanisms and the means to develop in team skills.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Jeffrey Boon Hui Yap and Martin Skitmore

Legions of projects fail to attain their time and cost objectives due to ineffective coordination. This is often due to a lack of essential learning from projects because…

Abstract

Purpose

Legions of projects fail to attain their time and cost objectives due to ineffective coordination. This is often due to a lack of essential learning from projects because of insufficient communication and working experience. One of the key reasons why this occurs is that managers are unaware of what knowledge needs to be retained. In contrast with knowledge management research, which mostly focuses on the systems and processes for capturing, storing, and retrieval of knowledge, this paper investigates the nature of project communication and learning and their role on project time and cost control.

Design/methodology/approach

A stratified proportional purposive sampling approach was adopted in choosing the interview participants for the study. They are experienced industry practitioners working on building construction projects in Malaysia. Content analysis was then performed on the interview data. The identified variables were further validated by 11 industry experts from the three primary construction stakeholders.

Findings

The results of a series of 12 in-depth interviews with industry practitioners are provided to reveal the effective communication tools for sharing and learning in a project-based environment, the learning inducing situations involved, and the use of reusable project experiences to improve project time and cost control.

Research limitations/implications

A possible limitation of the study is its focus on a small group of Malaysian practitioners delimits the generalizability of the findings.

Originality/value

A two-phase model with three-step project management process of input, tools, and output is developed from the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) Guide as an aid for more effective knowledge reuse in project time and cost control in the future.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

In our chapter we describe the analysis of categorisations as an important part of narrative criminology. Categorisations of people (as offenders, victims, witnesses…

Abstract

In our chapter we describe the analysis of categorisations as an important part of narrative criminology. Categorisations of people (as offenders, victims, witnesses, etc.) are a central component of the communicative construction and processing of crime. Categories are associated with assumptions about actions and personal characteristics. Therefore, categorisations play a prominent role in the question of whether and how someone should be dealt with or punished. Narratives essentially consist of categorisations as well as the representation of a temporal course of interactions and actions. Analysing categorisations can therefore provide decisive insights for narrative criminology. With the research method of ‘Membership Categorisation Analysis’, categorisations can be reconstructed in detail. We describe this potential by reconstructing how the defendant ‘Dave’ categorised himself in the context of his main trial and how he was categorised by others in order to justify a judgement against him. Our analysis shows that categorisations, which are socially impactful and often controversial, must be established by particular narrative manoeuvres.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Narrative Criminology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-006-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of 192