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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Dat Tien Doan, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Nicola Naismith, Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini, Tongrui Zhang and John Tookey

Green building information modelling (BIM) has been highlighted as an essential topic owing to its potential benefits. However, both Green Star and BIM are still in their…

Abstract

Purpose

Green building information modelling (BIM) has been highlighted as an essential topic owing to its potential benefits. However, both Green Star and BIM are still in their earlier stages in New Zealand. This paper aims to examine and evaluate the benefits, barriers/challenges and solutions for the integration of Green Star and BIM in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a total of 77 responses collected from construction professionals in New Zealand using questionnaires were analysed through descriptive and statistical tests.

Findings

Building performance modelling used for Green Star assessment can be implemented using BIM; this was highlighted as the most significant benefit of the integration. Whereas, the most significant barrier preventing the integration of Green Star and BIM was the fact they are two completely separate processes. Regarding the solutions for the integration, showcasing BIM-Green Star benchmark projects was considered as the most effective solution amongst a range of eight provided.

Originality/value

The research provided insights into Green Star–BIM integration in New Zealand. By evaluating the significance of the benefits, barriers/challenges and solutions for the integration, this research could be used as a guideline for Green Star and BIM development by New Zealand Green Building Council (NZGBC), the Government and construction practitioners in New Zealand. Specifically, the results here could be valuable inputs for Green Star manuals and the New Zealand BIM handbook.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Dat Tien Doan, Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Nicola Naismith, Amirhosein Ghaffarianhoseini, Tongrui Zhang and John Tookey

This research aims to explore the perspectives of the key actors in the New Zealand construction industry towards BIM adoption. Specifically, four themes are examined…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the perspectives of the key actors in the New Zealand construction industry towards BIM adoption. Specifically, four themes are examined, including what BIM is; BIM knowledge and understanding; benefits of BIM adoption; and challenges/barriers to BIM adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach using 21 semi-structured interviews with industry experts was adopted.

Findings

The results raise a question concerning whether the New Zealand construction industry needs a unique definition of BIM to achieve a clear and consistent understanding amongst construction practitioners. It was found out that most of the construction practitioners in New Zealand are not well aware of BIM, especially the contractors, QSs, supply chain companies and the SMEs. Fourteen potential benefits and ten barriers/challenges to BIM adoption were identified. Individually, time-saving was considered as the most benefit of BIM adoption while BIM understanding was suggested as the most significant barrier by all the interviewees.

Originality/value

The research provides valuable insights into BIM understanding as well as recommendations regarding BIM adoption in New Zealand. The results could be considered baseline information for the companies and government to have effective strategies towards BIM adoption. Furthermore, it confirms that characteristics such as benefits and barriers to BIM adoption amongst different countries could be similar. Therefore, it could be useful to analyse the studies, strategies and practices of the pioneer countries in BIM adoption for the implementation.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Ali GhaffarianHoseini, Dat Tien Doan, Nicola Naismith, John Tookey and Amirhosein GhaffarianHoseini

Green Star is becoming a broadly accepted mark of design quality and environmental sustainability. Compared to other green tools, Green Star is considered as one of main…

1394

Abstract

Purpose

Green Star is becoming a broadly accepted mark of design quality and environmental sustainability. Compared to other green tools, Green Star is considered as one of main streams green assessment tools, which cover almost sustainable criteria. Simultaneously, building information modelling (BIM) has also been introduced into the industry. BIM is expected to aid designers to shift the construction industry towards more environmentally and economically sustainable construction practice. Whilst the aspirations of Green Star rating and BIM implementation are broadly aligned, in the context of New Zealand this has led to some disconnects in design strategy and process. The purpose of this paper is to improve the practicality of BIM implementations for delivering Green Star certification in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The extensive literature review is conducted through a series of incremental steps. A conceptual framework focussing on the relationship between benefits and challenges of BIM and Green Star is then developed.

Findings

BIM supports practitioners to achieve the majority of Green Star criteria (75 per cent). Energy efficiency criterion is the key factor affecting the assessment process of Green Star and National Australian Built Environment Rating System in New Zealand. Research questions about lessening the challenges which can be encountered during the BIM and Green Star implementation are developed.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to a conceptual research. Further empirical research should be conducted to validate and modify the conceptual framework and the propositions presented in this paper to provide an initial insight into BIM and Green Star connectivity within the context of New Zealand.

Originality/value

This paper provided a clear picture for investors, developers, practitioners about benefits and challenges of BIM and Green Star implementation. The outcomes are anticipated to deliver visions for shifting the country further towards development of sustainable future cities.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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