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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

William Peter Andrews, Andrew Peter Wislocki, Fay Short, Daryl Chow and Takuya Minami

To replicate the Luton pilot study (Andrews et al., 2011), both by investigating treatment changes using the Human Givens (HG) approach via a practice research network…

Abstract

Purpose

To replicate the Luton pilot study (Andrews et al., 2011), both by investigating treatment changes using the Human Givens (HG) approach via a practice research network (PRN) and by assessing the viability of replacing the 34-item Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation Outcome Measure (CORE-OM) with the ten-item version (CORE-10).

Design/methodology/approach

Clients were included if they were offered the HG approach to manage psychological distress and attended at least one measured treatment session following their initial assessment. Pre-post treatment effect size (Cohen's d) was benchmarked against data from Clark et al. (2009). Potential differences in treatment effects based on type of termination (planned vs unplanned) and medication use were examined.

Findings

High correlation between the CORE-10 and CORE-OM and near-identical calculated effect sizes support the utilisation of CORE-10 as a routine outcome measure. Pre-post treatment effect size suggests that clients treated using the HG approach experienced relief from psychological distress.

Research limitations/implications

There was no experimental control nor evidence about the precise components of the HG treatment. Data on problem description and duration may not be reliable.

Practical implications

This larger study, involving thousands of cases in a wide variety of settings, reinforces the findings from the pilot study as to the plausibility of the HG approach in the relief of emotional distress.

Originality/value

The viability of using a ten-item scale to reliably measure treatment effectiveness will allow organisations to assess the quality of their treatment with minimal disruption to their service delivery allowing for true evidence-based practice. A PRN provides a suitable mechanism to assess psychotherapy treatment effectiveness in real-world settings.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

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Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Education Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-758-6

Book part
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Daryl Mahon

In the previous chapter, the reader will have become familiar with the idea of screening for traumatic experiences within organisations as a way to identify those who may

Abstract

In the previous chapter, the reader will have become familiar with the idea of screening for traumatic experiences within organisations as a way to identify those who may benefit most from interventions and support. In this chapter, I present an overview of the trauma therapy literature in the first instance and then explore some of the debates regarding specific trauma-informed treatments versus general therapeutic approaches. The multicultural competency literature is discussed, and the multicultural orientation approach of cultural humility, cultural opportunity and cultural comfort is highlighted in a practice context. This chapter concludes with a case study vignette that brings it all together with a clinical example of what trauma-informed therapy through a multicultural lens might look like. As such I operationalise choice, collaboration , trust and transparency, and cultural principles from the trauma-informed care literature. Although applied here to specific trauma-informed organisations, some of the methods and processes that I unpack can be used in non-specific organisations where social/case managers are employed and wish to operationalise choice and collaboration in a structured way.

Details

Trauma-Responsive Organisations: The Trauma Ecology Model
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-429-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Daryl Mahon

Organisations are increasingly understanding the need to be trauma informed. However, how trauma therapies in such organisations apply the principles of choice and…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations are increasingly understanding the need to be trauma informed. However, how trauma therapies in such organisations apply the principles of choice and collaboration is less understood. The present paper applies two trans-theoretical methods for involving clients in their therapy through preference accommodation and feedback-informed treatment (FIT). A case vignette is provided demonstrating how to involve clients in trauma therapy by listening to their preferences, needs and by providing them with a voice on their experience of the process and outcome of care.

Design/methodology/approach

A focused review of the literature was conducted, with relevant randomised control trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses sourced. The resulting information informed the design and this model for working with those in trauma therapy.

Findings

The research regarding trauma-specific therapies being more effective is far from conclusive. At the same time, early attrition and negative outcomes make up a large percentage of those seeking therapy. Using preference accommodation and FIT is one possibly way to mitigate against these experiences in therapy and to provide choice, preference and collaboration consisting with the principles of trauma-informed approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Methods to improve the experiences of those seeking trauma therapy have been identified and discussed. According to the author’s knowledge, this is the first known paper aligning trauma therapy and trauma-informed approaches with preference accommodation and FIT. Future empirical studies may wish to examine the relative effectiveness of this approach.

Practical implications

Methods to improve outcomes for those seeking trauma therapy are at the disposal of practitioners. Improving outcomes, while also providing choice, voice and collaboration is a clinical setting.

Originality/value

This is a novel paper adding to value and extending how practitioners can use principles of trauma-informed approaches within trauma therapy.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Daryl M. Guffey

This paper analyzes citations from the first 20 volumes of Advances in Management Accounting using Google Scholar in April and May, 2013.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyzes citations from the first 20 volumes of Advances in Management Accounting using Google Scholar in April and May, 2013.

Methodology/approach

This study assesses the success of the first 20 volumes of Advances in Management Accounting using citation analysis. Four citation metrics are used. The four citation metrics are: (1) total citations since year of publication until April and May, 2013, (2) citations per author since year of publication until April and May, 2013, (3) citations per year since year of publication until April and May, 2013, and (4) citations per author per year since year of publication until April and May, 2013.

Findings

The top 20 authors for each citation metric, the top 20 faculties for each citation metric, and the top 20 doctoral programs for each citation metric are determined. Furthermore, the top 20 articles are determined using two citation metrics and the H-index for Advances in Management Accounting is computed.

Originality/value of paper

Potential doctoral students, current doctoral students, “new” Ph.D.s with an interest in management accounting, current management accounting faculty, department chairs, deans, other administrators, journal editors, and journal publishers will find these results informative.

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2009

Ricardo Codinhoto, Patricia Tzortzopoulos, Mike Kagioglou, Ghassan Aouad and Rachel Cooper

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework that categorises the features and characteristics of the built environment that impact on health outcomes.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework that categorises the features and characteristics of the built environment that impact on health outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review was carried out. A total of 1,163 abstracts were assessed, leading to 92 papers being reviewed.

Findings

There is a considerable amount of evidence linking healthcare environments to patients' health outcomes, despite the lack of clarity in relation to cause‐effect relationships.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a theoretical framework linking different built environment characteristics to health outcomes. This framework provides a structure to group causal effects according to their relation with design features, materials and ambient properties, art and aesthetic aspects and use of the built environment.

Details

Facilities, vol. 27 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2009

Rachel Macdonald, Ilfryn Price and Phil Askham

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible common factors in 15 Acute Hospital Trusts in the UK that achieved excellent scores at all their sites in four…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the possible common factors in 15 Acute Hospital Trusts in the UK that achieved excellent scores at all their sites in four years of national Patient Environment audits.

Design/methodology/approach

A desk‐based study tested for external factors, organisational commonalities or particular contractual arrangements which the sample might have in common. A second piece of work was then undertaken; an ethnographic study that examined the behaviours exhibited by 22 managers in six of the trusts. The second phase of research will be described in a separate paper.

Findings

The research found that no external, organisational or contractual commonalities could be identified as shared by the trusts that formed the Research Group. This led the researchers to ask further questions as to the management/leadership of the FM Managers who had achieved consistantly high standards of Patient Environment over the four year period.

Practical implications

The research reveals that the trusts which achieved high standards of Patient Environment had no shared advantage in terms of external, organisational or contract characteristics. Thus, it should be possible for all trusts to achieve consistently high standards.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the only study looking at influences and characteristics that are outside the FM Managers' control and impact on the FMs' ability to deliver consistantly high standards.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Cheryl J. Craig

In this chapter, the professional knowledge landscape of schools is explored for its shaping effect on the life satisfaction and morale of teachers. Knowledge communities…

Abstract

In this chapter, the professional knowledge landscape of schools is explored for its shaping effect on the life satisfaction and morale of teachers. Knowledge communities, those associations and relationships that teachers experience as they navigate life in schools, is the conceptual lens that is used. Two teacher stories are explored. Both narratives reveal emotional and relationship influences on teachers as they find, build and work in knowledge communities. Knowledge community interactions, in turn, help them to understand the issues of their school community and support their survival on the larger professional landscape. This chapter uses narrative inquiry to analyse the stories that the teachers in the two exemplars (one Canadian; one American) lived and relived, told and re-told. Finally, serial interpretation allows for the unearthing of encompassing ideas which cut across both narratives and make visible common themes worthy of research attention.

Details

Emotion and School: Understanding how the Hidden Curriculum Influences Relationships, Leadership, Teaching, and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-651-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Bojan Obrenovic, Jianguo Du, Danijela Godinić and Diana Tsoy

This study aims to examine psychological mechanisms underlying tacit knowledge-sharing behaviours. The personality trait of conscientiousness is tested in relation to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine psychological mechanisms underlying tacit knowledge-sharing behaviours. The personality trait of conscientiousness is tested in relation to knowledge sharing, and the effect of eagerness and subjective norm on the intention to share is measured in the context of local and multinational knowledge-intensive enterprises in Croatia.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative study was conducted on a sample of 288 employees of small and medium-sized companies working on knowledge-intensive tasks. The purposive sampling technique and a survey strategy were used in the study. Organizational affiliation, as it was presumed that these individuals possess a higher degree of tacit knowledge. The data collection was conducted in October 2019. Respondents worked in science and technology companies in Croatia on assignments involving information technology, electronics, petrochemicals, medicine and biochemistry. Statistical product and service solutions analysis of a moment structures software was used to perform confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings suggest that the personality trait of conscientiousness has a positive impact on tacit knowledge sharing behaviour. An attitude of eagerness and subjective norm were also confirmed as predictors of tacit knowledge sharing behaviour. Furthermore, conscientiousness influences the eagerness to share knowledge. A significant association between subjective norm and conscientiousness was also established. Finally, the mediating effects were identified, indicating that subjective norm and eagerness mediate the relationship between conscientiousness and tacit knowledge sharing.

Practical implications

Explaining the relationship between personality and attitude in the context of knowledge sharing will result in a better understanding of factors that should be nurtured within individuals. Accordingly, distinct management initiatives are to be developed to suit these factors. Furthermore, to intensify the knowledge exchange when working on knowledge-intensive tasks of significant economic value, organizations tailor a more particularistic application to suit the individual in the domain of leadership, staffing decisions, work organization and incentive systems.

Originality/value

This study provides an in-depth analysis and theoretical understanding of factors salient for knowledge-sharing behaviour. The authors provide an overview of how knowledge sharing evolves during social interaction through intensive problem-solving sessions and teamwork. The authors render the explanation on how the personality trait of conscientiousness, conjoint with the attitude of eagerness to share know-how in the expert surrounding, is conducive to the generation of tacit knowledge sharing. Underpinning this study are employees’ psychological motives and internal drives to communicate individual cognitive capital outweighing the potential negative consequences, such as losing the competitive advantage over the colleagues.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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