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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Darwin Silalahi, Fiz Firmanzah, Irwan Adi Ekaputra, Riani Rachmawati and Manerep Pasaribu

This paper examines the motivational influence of individuals’ team identification (TID) on their ambidexterity (TA), prosocial impact (TPS), and task performance (TTP) at…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the motivational influence of individuals’ team identification (TID) on their ambidexterity (TA), prosocial impact (TPS), and task performance (TTP) at the team level of analysis, as well as investigates the role of TA in mediating TID’s relationship with both TTP and TPS.

Design/methodology/approach

By using a cross-sectional sample of 102 cross-functional teams with a total of 362 individual members from 22 firms in the customer-facing industries of Indonesia, we analyzed multilevel data and tested hypotheses using aggregated team-level structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

This study supports a significant positive relationship between TID and TA. Further, while TA fully mediates the relationship between TID and TTP, TID has a direct influence on TPS.

Practical implications

This study contributes to filling the gaps in empirical evidence pertaining to the role of identity in motivating employees beyond their formal employment contracts. Their immediate leaders play a crucial role in individuals’ daily work lives and affect how they view their social identifications with their team, which subsequently contributes toward the enhancement of people and organizational performances.

Originality/value

Our study offers empirical evidence in support of the identity-enhanced principal-agent model and contributes to the literature on Social Identity Theory with a focus on the individual-group interface. To our knowledge, our study is the first empirical research on the influence of TID on TA, TPT, and TPS across multiple firms in the customer-facing industries.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Peng Wang, Peng Wu, Xiangyu Wang, Xin Chen and Tao Zhou

Facility structures in liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants require tremendous amounts of scaffolding to facilitate relevant industrial operation and maintenance. As such…

Abstract

Purpose

Facility structures in liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants require tremendous amounts of scaffolding to facilitate relevant industrial operation and maintenance. As such, the productivity of scaffolding operations in turnaround maintenance (TAM) has attracted much attention in recent years. In addition, health and safety issues have been recognised as a key contributor along with productivity improvement in the LNG industry. This study aims to integrate work posture analysis into value stream mapping to achieve an optimised and balanced improvement in both productivity and health and safety.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is adopted to integrate lean and work posture analysis in a TAM site. The lean improvement is conducted through value stream mapping, and the work posture analysis is conducted through the Ovako Working Posture Analysis System method. A three-step optimisation strategy is then developed for achieving optimised performance in waste reduction and work posture improvement.

Findings

It is found that the implementation of value stream mapping can help eliminate waste in the installation process, therefore eliminating potential health and safety risks. However, health and safety of onsite workers does not always improve as lean implementation intensifies. There is an optimised erection schedule that has the lowest health and safety risk within a waste reduction target.

Originality/value

In contradiction to previous studies, which rely on qualitative assessment to identify the a positive correlation between lean and health and safety, this study reveals the distinct difference between lean attributes and health and safety attributes through a quantitative assessment and is more readily to be implemented at the site level for simultaneous improvement in lean and health and safety.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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