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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Patrick Barber, Andrew Graves, Mark Hall, Darryl Sheath and Cyril Tomkins

A methodology was developed to measure cost of quality failures in two major road projects, largely based upon a work‐shadowing method. Shows how the initial data were…

Abstract

A methodology was developed to measure cost of quality failures in two major road projects, largely based upon a work‐shadowing method. Shows how the initial data were collected and categorised into definable groups and how the costs were estimated for each of these categories. The findings suggest that, if the projects examined are typical, the cost of failures may be a significant percentage of total costs, and that conventional means of identifying them may not be reliable. Moreover, the costs will not be easy to eradicate without widespread changes in attitudes and norms of behaviour within the industry and improved managerial co‐ordination of activities throughout the supply chain.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

MICHAIL KAGIOGLOU, RACHEL COOPER, GHASSAN AOUAD and MARTIN SEXTON

The complexity of construction projects and the fragmentation of the construction industry undertaking those projects has effectively resulted in linear, uncoordinated and…

Abstract

The complexity of construction projects and the fragmentation of the construction industry undertaking those projects has effectively resulted in linear, uncoordinated and highly variable project processes in the UK construction sector. Research undertaken at the University of Salford resulted in the development of an improved project process, the Process Protocol, which considers the whole lifecycle of a construction project whilst integrating its participants under a common framework. The Process Protocol identifies the various phases of a construction project with particular emphasis on what is described in the manufacturing industry as the ‘fuzzy front end’. The participants in the process are described in terms of the activities that need to be undertaken in order to achieve a successful project and process execution. In addition, the decision‐making mechanisms, from a client perspective, are illustrated and the foundations for a learning organization/industry are facilitated within a consistent Process Protocol.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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