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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2020

Dario Miocevic

B2B marketing scholarship has acknowledged that relational capital and relationship-specific investments (RSIs) are critical relational drivers for explaining the success…

Abstract

Purpose

B2B marketing scholarship has acknowledged that relational capital and relationship-specific investments (RSIs) are critical relational drivers for explaining the success of business relationships, especially those in an export-import (E-I) context. However, the literature is still inconclusive on whether E-I partners should accentuate relational drivers to the fullest in order to increase relationship value. By drawing on relational view of competitive advantage and literature that explored the dark side of business relationships, the author builds a conceptual model exploring the boundary conditions (historical ties and relational capabilities) upon which relational drivers enhance or diminish relationship value in key E-I relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the proposed model, a survey was conducted among 114 industrial exporters from Croatia. The data was analyzed with the use of confirmatory factor analysis and hierarchical regression.

Findings

This study contributes to the international B2B literature in two ways. First, the findings show that in the case of strong historical ties between E-I partners, relational capital has an inverted U-shape association with the relationship value, whereas in the case of weak historical ties this relationship becomes linear. Second, the findings show that an importer’s RSI will lead to the highest relationship value when an exporter reciprocates through employing relational capabilities through which the exporter adapts his business model to the needs of the importer. In case of an exporter’s weak relational capabilities, the relationship between an importer’s RSIs and the relationship value flips into an inverted U-shape.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature on dark side of business relationships by offering insights into the boundary conditions that are essential for sustaining the relationship value in key E-I relationships. The study reveals that historical ties and relational capabilities represent boundary conditions that offer a more detailed explanation what is the optimal configuration of relational drives that would increase the relationship value between key E-I partners.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Dario Miocevic and Robert E. Morgan

The academic inquiry of operational capabilities (OCs) has claimed focal interest in mainstream strategy research. Recent theoretical advances suggest these capabilities…

Abstract

Purpose

The academic inquiry of operational capabilities (OCs) has claimed focal interest in mainstream strategy research. Recent theoretical advances suggest these capabilities are a fundamental trigger to the identification and exploitation of entrepreneurial opportunities. However, the extant literature has been, at best, partial with regard to empirical insights that integrate OCs with entrepreneurial opportunities. Addressing this theoretical lacuna from the standpoint of organisational learning theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the interplay between OCs and entrepreneurial opportunities and their overall impact on exporting SME’s growth.

Design/methodology/approach

To realise the empirical aims a descriptive research design employing a survey methodology was used. The authors are generated data from a sample of 117 exporting small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) in Croatia. Ordinary least squares regression was employed to test the conceptual model and five derived hypotheses.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that market-sensing capabilities are vital in enhancing exporting SME’s opportunity recognition capacity and the rate of international opportunity exploitation that leads to increased firm growth. Also, study findings show that the link between the increased rate of international opportunity exploitation contributes more to the growth when exporting SMEs have highly developed adaptive and innovation capabilities.

Research limitations/implications

This study brings to surface some novel insights about how exporting SMEs can better design their export marketing strategy. The results suggest, OCs occupy key role in the exporting SMEs international venturing efforts by delivering higher growth.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the export marketing strategy field by offering empirical evidence that both capability and opportunity-based views should be assessed simultaneously in explaining exporting SME’s competitiveness. Finally, we offer valuable theoretical and practical implications as well as avenues for further research that should extend our knowledge in the field.

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Dario Miocevic and Biljana Crnjak‐Karanovic

Global mindset has gained the respectable attention of international business scholars. Global mindset is a multidisciplinary concept comprised of cognitive and cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

Global mindset has gained the respectable attention of international business scholars. Global mindset is a multidisciplinary concept comprised of cognitive and cultural dimensions which both influence the international behavior and decision making of the firm. The key purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that global mindset is a crucial cognitive driver of the small and medium‐sized enterprise (SME) internationalization process. In order to do so, it aims to establish the link between global mindset and export performance outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a literature review, the conceptual model was developed. Data were obtained through survey questionnaire and analyzed using partial least squares (PLS) path modeling on the sample of 121 exporting SMEs in Croatia.

Findings

Findings of this study suggest that global mindset is positively, directly and significantly related to the export performance. Furthermore, the link between global mindset and export performance was assessed with the moderating effect of international experience (export diversity and export intensity) and findings reveal that there is no significant moderating effect present.

Research limitations/implications

Findings of this study suggest that global mindset is a crucial driver of the SME internationalization process as it exhibited a significant impact on the export performance outcomes. However, the focus of this paper was solely on the strategic (cognitive) dimension of global mindset. Future studies are yet to reveal the relevance of the integrated concept of global mindset.

Originality/value

The value‐added of this study is in the idea that market‐specific experience cannot be easily transferred to other foreign markets by utilizing global mindset. The moderating effect of international experience dimensions on relationship between global mindset and export performance was found to be insignificant. Eventually, findings suggest that global mindset is not related to the SME's international experience.

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Dario Miocevic

During their process of going international, small and medium-sized manufacturing firms seek to establish long-term relationships with key importers in order to minimize…

Abstract

Purpose

During their process of going international, small and medium-sized manufacturing firms seek to establish long-term relationships with key importers in order to minimize the risks of doing business in a foreign market. In the process of establishing long-term relationships, exporters aim to create relational capital with key importers. Yet, the body of international marketing literature that addresses the importance of relational capital in exporter-importer (E-I) relationships is still underdeveloped. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of relational norms on relational capital in key E-I relationships under the moderating influence of formal and informal institutional distance. The study’s conceptual framework was developed by integrating relational exchange and institutional theories.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out by using a survey methodology. Data were obtained by questionnaire from a sample of 122 small and medium-sized exporters from the manufacturing industry in Croatia. In order to test the hypotheses, the ordinary least squares technique was employed.

Findings

The findings support the hypotheses, implying that the development of relational capital requires relational efforts in terms of reliance and relational bonding norms. Additionally, the empirical data suggest that the dimensions of formal and informal institutional distance significantly moderate the relationships between relational norms and relational capital.

Originality/value

The value-added of this study is embedded within the theoretical framing and empirical testing of the antecedents of relational capital in key E-I relationships in the context of the institutional distance between partners, which has been neglected by previous studies in the field.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

John M. Violanti, Desta Fekedulegn, Mingming Shi and Michael E. Andrew

Law enforcement is a dangerous profession not only due to assaults, accidents and homicides but also due to health risks. This study examined trends in the national…

Abstract

Purpose

Law enforcement is a dangerous profession not only due to assaults, accidents and homicides but also due to health risks. This study examined trends in the national frequency and rate of law enforcement job-related illness deaths in the United States over a 22-year period (1997–2018).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund (NLEOMF) on death frequencies related to health issues at work. Death rates were based on the total number of police officers in the United States [rate = (frequency/population at risk) × 100,000]. Trends were examined using standardized regression.

Findings

A total of 646 deaths were attributed to job-related illness. There was a significant upward trend in overall job-related illness deaths (frequency analyses: β = 0.88, < 0.0001; rate analyses: β = 0.82, p ≤ 0.0001) mainly driven by a significant increase in 911 cancer deaths (frequency analyses: β = 0.88, < 0.0001; rate analyses: β = 0.88, p ≤ 0.0001). Nearly 82 percent of circulatory deaths were from a heart attack, with an average death age of 46.5 years.

Research limitations/implications

Deaths were not included if they failed to meet medical requirements of the NLEOMF. The data are descriptive, do not estimate risk and should be interpreted cautiously.

Practical implications

Police wellness programs may help to reduce the danger of deaths associated with job-related illness.

Originality/value

This is among the first studies to examine frequency and rate of police health–related deaths due to job exposures.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

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