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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Kyle A. Huggins, Darin W. White, Betsy Bugg Holloway and John D. Hansen

This study aims to examine how an organization’s Web-based marketing communication strategies drive feelings of customer gratitude and desired behavioral responses. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how an organization’s Web-based marketing communication strategies drive feelings of customer gratitude and desired behavioral responses. The study specifically examines how a key cultural characteristic, ethnic identity, works in conjunction with Web quality to influence customers’ gratitude perceptions, thereby driving increases in positive word of mouth, repeat purchase intentions and price tolerance.

Design/methodology/approach

A major soccer e-retailer based in the USA collected survey data for the study. The authors examined the direct and indirect effects of Web quality through conditional process analysis.

Findings

Study findings indicate that customers’ Web quality and ethnic identity perceptions significantly influence customer gratitude and performance outcomes. Study findings also demonstrate the central mediating role of gratitude on the main and interactive effects of Web quality and ethnic identity.

Practical implications

Study findings suggest that online strategies of cultural-adaptation should go beyond integration of native language to include all key dimensions of website quality, to drive consumer gratitude and ultimately favorable outcomes such as word of mouth, price tolerance and repurchase intentions.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates empirical support for the successful deployment of relationship marketing efforts that impact all three dimensions (affect, cognition and behavioral intention) of customer gratitude.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Darin W. White

It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate theoretically and empirically how the marketing strategy creation style implemented by a channel leader in a franchise…

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3467

Abstract

Purpose

It is the purpose of this study to demonstrate theoretically and empirically how the marketing strategy creation style implemented by a channel leader in a franchise system impacts the overall climate of trust within the channel system. Specifically, this study seeks to answer two important research questions: should franchisors direct franchisees in prescribed behaviors, or should the franchisees be allowed to play a more fundamental role in the strategy‐making process? How does this decision affect the overall level of trust within the franchise system relationship?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates the impact of four common strategy‐making styles in a study of 244 fast food franchise businesses and compares the findings with those previously obtained in other settings.

Findings

Support was found for the hypotheses, which stated that the channel climate of franchise systems implementing the symbolic, generative, or transactive modes of strategy‐making would be characterized by a higher degree of trust than would the climate of franchise systems implementing the rational mode.

Research limitations/implications

The empirical test considered only one industry (the fast food industry), and only one side of the franchisor‐franchisee dyad (the franchisee's perceptions) was used for the empirical tests.

Originality/value

The findings of the paper contribute significantly to an overall understanding of the development of effective, successful franchise channel relationships.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Darin W. White, Lucretia Goddard and Nick Wilbur

The purpose of this paper is to test empirically the impact of negative information about a celebrity spokesperson on consumers' perceptions of the endorsed brand. In…

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21292

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test empirically the impact of negative information about a celebrity spokesperson on consumers' perceptions of the endorsed brand. In addition, it is the first study to examine the reverse relationship: the impact of negative information about the brand on the celebrity endorser.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐group, post‐test‐only, randomized experimental design was utilized to test the hypotheses. Data were collected by a survey of 247 college students.

Findings

The results of an experiment indicate that when respondents are exposed to negative information about a celebrity endorser, a negative transference of affect in the endorsement relationship will occur. However, when the situation is reversed and the respondents are exposed to negative information about the brand, the transference of affect is mitigated.

Research limitations/implications

The present study provides a starting‐point for further research on negative information transference in the celebrity endorsement relationship.

Practical implications

It is crucial that retailers be aware of the risks associated with using celebrities to endorse their stores and products. Given that these results provide tentative support for the commonly held belief that a decline in the celebrity's image can impact the image of the brand, it is important that retailers carefully choose an endorser who currently has a good image and will likely be able to uphold this image in the future.

Originality/value

The paper introduces and empirically examines one explanation of how negative information may impact the celebrity advertising process.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Darin W. White and Keith Absher

The purpose of this paper is to examine the retail store decision criteria of customers in founder member states of the European Union and customers in Central and Eastern…

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3936

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the retail store decision criteria of customers in founder member states of the European Union and customers in Central and Eastern European (CEE) accession member states.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review we theorize that significant differences will exist between founder member state customers and CEE accession member customers and that retailers would be wise to forego a standardized retail mix in favour of strategies more precisely adapted to individual national markets. Utilizing a well‐established retail customer decision criteria scale, the authors collected data from 1,221 Eastern and Western EU customers.

Findings

It was found that CEE shoppers hold very high expectations of what they desire in a retail store. Indeed, their expectations were higher than those of founder member state customers on 21 of the 22 dimensions measured.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the convenience nature of the data collection method utilized in the current study, future research that examines these two groups might want to employ a more stratified sampling approach across all the countries. Other limitations that provide fertile ground for future studies include specific explorations of the retail decision criteria with more complex measurement scales, which tap each sub construct more thoroughly.

Practical implications

It is apparent that retailers should thoroughly evaluate new target markets, especially when they are distant and unfamiliar and they should pursue country‐adapted strategies when entering the new CEE accession states.

Originality/value

The paper presents some of the first empirical research that examines the diversity of retail preferences across the enlarged EU.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2013

Darin W. White and Keith Absher

Previous research has solidly demonstrated that successful sports teams and athletes can sway purchase behavior and other critical outcomes (Braunstein-Minkove et al.;…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has solidly demonstrated that successful sports teams and athletes can sway purchase behavior and other critical outcomes (Braunstein-Minkove et al.; McEvoy; Bush et al.). The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact that a globally prominent sports team can have on perceptions of the country by foreigners. The importance of a country's image as a cue in consumer choice behavior is well recognized in the business literature. However, relatively little empirical research has been done in determining what factors influence the formation of country-of-origin (COO) image in the minds of potential consumers and tourists. The paper theorizes that loyalty and viewership of a country's sports team will be a significant predictor of COO image.

Design/methodology/approach

In all, 951 individuals from four different countries were surveyed to determine their loyalty and viewership of Manchester United Football Club and their perceptions of the geographic home of the team.

Findings

The results indicate significant effects of both team loyalty and team viewership on the COO image by foreigners, especially highlighting noteworthy differences between foreigners with strong loyalty toward the globally prominent sports team and foreigners with weak to nonexistent loyalty regarding the interaction of these effects.

Originality/value

Few studies have sought to empirically explore what factors influence the formation of COO image. The current research contributes to the ever growing COO image body of knowledge by demonstrating the importance that a globally prominent sports team can play in generating positive perceptions of a country by foreigners. The paper further demonstrates that a country should pursue opportunities that allow foreigners to watch the globally prominent sports team play.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

William Nance and Darin White

The purpose of this study is to examine how service performance and procedural justice are related and how this relationship is moderated by family life cycle (FLC) and…

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1640

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine how service performance and procedural justice are related and how this relationship is moderated by family life cycle (FLC) and culture. While it has long been assumed that customer perceptions of fair treatment by service providers are related to service quality perceptions, there has been little research that explicitly examines this relationship. Previous research has established that justice is an influential antecedent of behavior and attitudes in many different settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a 42‐item survey instrument combining the SERVPERF scale, a procedural justice scale and several demographic measures, responses were obtained from 717 individuals from Central and Eastern Europe and the USA. A 2×2 factorial design was used to evaluate the relationship between service performance and justice perceptions, and the moderating impacts of FLC position and culture on these perceptions.

Findings

Strong evidence was found to support the notion that fair treatment of customers affects service performance perceptions across both FLC position and culture.

Research limitations/implications

Only one service industry (higher education) was used. This study should be replicated in other industry settings to provide validation across industries.

Originality/value

From both empirical and theoretical standpoints, this study bridges the gap between two separate but related literature streams of service performance and procedural justice.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

Frances Neel Cheney

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here…

Abstract

Communications regarding this column should be addressed to Mrs. Cheney, Peabody Library School, Nashville, Tenn. 37203. Mrs. Cheney does not sell the books listed here. They are available through normal trade sources. Mrs. Cheney, being a member of the editorial board of Pierian Press, will not review Pierian Press reference books in this column. Descriptions of Pierian Press reference books will be included elsewhere in this publication.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2017

Darin Freeburg

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a Knowledge Lens for information literacy. This lens shifts the focus and potential outcomes of information literacy in three…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a Knowledge Lens for information literacy. This lens shifts the focus and potential outcomes of information literacy in three ways. First, it promotes self-reflection as a means of integrating information. Second, it promotes creation, emphasizing it as a social process. Third, it promotes the ability and value of working with imprecision and lack of direction.

Design/methodology/approach

The author designed a Community of Practice (CoP) with a loosely structured guidebook to operationalize the Knowledge Lens. The initial stated purpose of the CoP was to provide innovative solutions to issues of race relations in South Carolina. A group of 19 participants – representing four churches – met twice a month for one year. After one year, a core group of 6 participants were interviewed to identify elements of this new lens.

Findings

Participants indicated that they changed in many ways after the CoP, suggesting that the Knowledge Lens increases the impact of literacy work. In particular, they were able to utilize internal tension to spark innovation, found value in direct engagement with one another without the need to first codify their thinking, and increased their reliance on information encountering.

Originality/value

Information literacy has attempted to move beyond stale concepts, and the Knowledge Lens facilitates this movement. It takes information literacy beyond the mere provision of access to existing information. It recognizes barriers to information integration. And it involves individuals in co-creation to solve problems that lack an existing codified solution.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2020

Michael T. Solotke, Andrea Barbieri, Darin Latimore and John Encandela

Leadership training refers to the process of helping individuals develop skills to successfully perform in leadership positions. Existing leadership programs have several…

Abstract

Purpose

Leadership training refers to the process of helping individuals develop skills to successfully perform in leadership positions. Existing leadership programs have several drawbacks, including the paucity of leadership programs designed for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ+) individuals in health care. The authors addressed this gap by creating and hosting Q-Forward (formerly Q-Med), the first conference focused specifically on leadership development for LGBTQ+ health trainees.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the authors explain how a conference focused on leadership development for LGBTQ+ health trainees can have benefits for trainees, patients and the health-care system. The authors also report the conference proceedings, including planning, participants, guiding principles and programming.

Originality/value

This conference was the first conference for LGBTQ+ health trainees focused specifically on leadership training. The authors believe that the conference was unique, and that such training represents an essential step toward long-term improvements in the health of LGBTQ+ people and other populations.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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