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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Daramola Thompson Olapade, Benjamin Gbolahan Ekemode and Abel Olaleye

Earlier studies have suggested the creation of a central database of concluded property transactions as a panacea to the property data debacle. It is in this regard that…

Abstract

Purpose

Earlier studies have suggested the creation of a central database of concluded property transactions as a panacea to the property data debacle. It is in this regard that the purpose of this paper is to examine the perception of potential users of centralised property database on the consideration for the design and management of such database.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were administered on 190 property practitioners (referred as estate surveying and valuation firms) in Lagos property market. Frequency index, frequency distribution and percentage were employed for data analysis.

Findings

The result showed that respondents preferred a web-based databank and free access to the information in the databank by those who recorded their market data in it. They also preferred uniform recording standard in the databank, an interface that must be user friendly and secure to prevent unauthorised user from gaining access, amongst others. The practitioners also preferred that their professional body manage the databank when it is created.

Practical implications

The paper provides useful insights into creating a property database that will improve accessibility to property data in opaque markets.

Originality/value

There is still little or no empirical research on framework/end-users’ requirements for the creation of property transaction database in emerging property markets.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Daramola Thompson Olapade, Biodun Olapade and Bioye Tajudeen Aluko

This paper aims to explore the use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques as a legitimate means of ejection of recalcitrant tenant in property. This is with a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the use of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) techniques as a legitimate means of ejection of recalcitrant tenant in property. This is with a view of providing information that will improve property investment and management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a case study approach using five selected case studies where ADR approach was used to recover premises.

Findings

The experience from the case studies shows that the use of ADR in premises recovery is effective but has its challenges. In the five case studies, consent judgment, mediation and negotiation were used to recover premises in less than three months compared to an average of 18 months using litigation. Also, the cost in all the cases were lower where they exist at all than when litigation are used. The paper provides useful information to practitioners on the use of the effective alternative approach to recover premises from recalcitrant tenants.

Originality/value

The paper provides practical ways through which recovery of premises could be achieved through non-adversarial technique in developing property markets, which hitherto was not available in literature.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Daramola Thompson Olapade, Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele and Abel Olaleye

The purpose of this paper is to examine the of characteristics of Lagos, Nigeria property market and its submarkets on the prism of the market practitioners 

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the of characteristics of Lagos, Nigeria property market and its submarkets on the prism of the market practitioners’ characteristics, market transaction structure and market maturity. This is done with a view to provide information capable of improving the flow of foreign real estate investment to the Lagos property market.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were sourced through questionnaire administered on firms of property practitioners in the market. A total of 190 firms were selected using the stratified random sampling technique based on their geographical location. Descriptive statistics and Mann−Whitney U Test were employed for data analysis.

Findings

The results showed that the Lagos property market was characterised by practitioners whose highest level of education was majorly first degree, and with a mean computer literacy ranking of 3.38 on a five-point Likert scale. Also, major transactions in the market included letting and sales. The market maturity index of the market was 2.95 and therefore adjudged as an emerging market. The analysis also revealed that there was no significant difference in the characteristics of the submarkets.

Practical implications

The results of the study are capable of enhancing investment decision in the market.

Originality/value

The study differentiates itself from and adds to the previous studies on market characteristics through an examination of the property market on the prism of the market transaction structure, market practitioners’ characteristics and maturity of the market holistically in the context of an African emerging market.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 February 2019

Daramola Thompson Olapade and Abel Olaleye

With a focus on Lagos property market, the purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence accessibility to data for valuation and investment analysis in…

Abstract

Purpose

With a focus on Lagos property market, the purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that influence accessibility to data for valuation and investment analysis in Nigeria. This was with a view to improving accessibility to property data in the market, thereby enhancing investment appraisal practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data utilized for the study were sourced through the use of questionnaire administered on property practitioners (referred to as estate surveying and valuation (ESV) firms) in Lagos property market. A total of 190 ESV firms were selected using stratified random sampling based on their geographical location. Relative significance index (RSI), frequency distribution and principal component analysis (PCA) were employed for data analysis.

Findings

A total of 19 factors were identified as affecting accessibility to data. Confidentiality attached to property data by practitioners was ranked as the most significant factor with RSI of 0.81. The next three factors were lack of cooperation within members of professional body (0.79), accuracy of data (0.76) and duty of care to client (0.75), while the least ranked factor was duplication of data set (0.63). All the 19 variables were further grouped into six principal factors using PCA, namely, economic, attitudinal, ethical, legal, administrative and technical factors; with each factor explaining the following variance, 16.75, 16.1, 13.64, 12.78, 10.51 and 7.95, respectively.

Practical implications

The paper’s results will enable stakeholders to address the challenges to data accessibility in Lagos property market and similar opaque markets elsewhere thereby enhancing property data accessibility and investment analysis.

Originality/value

The paper is an attempt to examine the factors affecting accessibility to data identified in different studies holistically together in a single study and from the perspective of an emerging property market like Nigeria.

Details

Property Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Daramola Thompson Olapade and Abel Olaleye

With a focus on Lagos, Nigeria property market, the purpose of this paper is to examine the willingness of property practitioners towards property data sharing and…

Abstract

Purpose

With a focus on Lagos, Nigeria property market, the purpose of this paper is to examine the willingness of property practitioners towards property data sharing and assemblage with a view to improving accessibility to commercial property data in Nigerian property market.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were sourced through the use of questionnaire administered on property practitioners (referred as estate surveying and valuation (ESV) firms) in Lagos property market. In total, 190 ESV firms were selected using stratified random sampling based on their geographical location, frequency distribution, percentage, and cross-tabulation were employed for data analysis.

Findings

The results showed that majority of the practitioners (68.1 per cent) were willing to share property data among themselves while 52.6 per cent of the practitioners were in support of data assemblage. The result also revealed the higher the experience of the practitioners, the more they are averse to data sharing. It was also revealed that the bigger firm are more averse to data assemblage than the smaller firms. Meanwhile, majority of the practitioners (93.3 per cent) were in support of creation of a central database.

Practical implications

The study concluded that without the willingness of practitioners to support data assemblage, the data debacle in property market might not be resolved.

Originality/value

The paper is an attempt towards the possibility of creating database of concluded transactions, which will improve accessibility to property data in opaque property market.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Daramola Thompson Olapade and Benjamin Gbolahan Ekemode

This paper aims to examine the awareness and utilisation of building information modelling (BIM) for facility management (FM) among FM companies in Lagos, Nigeria. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the awareness and utilisation of building information modelling (BIM) for facility management (FM) among FM companies in Lagos, Nigeria. This was with a view of increasing the awareness level and promoting adoption of BIM in FM practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data used for the study were sourced through questionnaire administered on the 37 FM companies that are corporate members of International Facility Management Association in Lagos, Nigeria. Frequency distribution and relative significance index were used for data analysis.

Findings

Findings of the study suggest a low level of awareness and adoption of BIM for FM in the study area. Only 2 of the 31 FM companies surveyed were using BIM for their FM services. Also, the majority of the respondents (n = 22, 71 per cent) perceived that the awareness of BIM in the facilities management industry in Nigeria is very low.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provided industry stakeholders with information on the level of awareness and utilisation of BIM for FM practice in Nigeria, thereby giving insights on the possible integration of BIM with FM practices in developing countries.

Originality/value

The paper is a pioneer research on the awareness and utilisation of BIM for facilities management from the perspective of an emerging property market like Nigeria.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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