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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Chloe Preece, Finola Kerrigan and Daragh O’Reilly

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on value creation by examining value within the visual arts market and arguing for a broader, socio-culturally informed…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on value creation by examining value within the visual arts market and arguing for a broader, socio-culturally informed view of value creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop an original conceptual framework to model the value co-creation process through which art is legitimised. An illustrative case study of artist Damien Hirst demonstrates the application of this framework.

Findings

The findings illustrate how value is co-constructed in the visual arts market, demonstrating a need to understand social relationships as value is dispersed, situational and in-flux.

Research limitations/implications

The authors problematise the view that value emerges as a result of operant resources “producing effects” through working on operand resources. Rather, adopting the socio-cultural approach, the authors demonstrate how value emerges and is co-constructed, negotiated and circulated. The authors establish the need to reconceptualise value as created collaboratively with other actors within industry sectors. The locus of control is, therefore, dispersed. Moreover, power dynamics at play mean that “consumers” are not homogenous; some are more important than others in the valuation process.

Practical implications

This more distributed notion of value blurs boundaries between product and service, producer and consumer, offering a more unified perspective on value co-creation, which can be used in strategic decision-making.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates that value co-creation must be understood in relation to understanding patterns of hierarchy that influence this process.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Chinedu James Obiegbu, Gretchen Larsen, Nick Ellis and Daragh O’Reilly

This paper aims to answer the following question: How can a discursive approach to how music fans construct loyalty in a digital context contribute to a theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to answer the following question: How can a discursive approach to how music fans construct loyalty in a digital context contribute to a theoretical understanding of brand loyalty?

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on insights from theories of brand loyalty and fandom, this interpretive inquiry makes use of data from an online forum dedicated to the rock music band, U2, and interviews with forum members. A combination of online ethnography and discourse analysis are used.

Findings

The analysis shows that music fans mobilise particular discursive resources in constructing loyalty in the digital context, specifically length of time spent as a fan, obsession and the opposition of obligation and choice. These discursive resources reflect a grounded account of an experientially rooted brand loyalty that extends beyond attitudinal and behavioural loyalty and which is particularly salient in music consumption.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study, but as a rich and vibrant online community, it provides fruitful insights into the discursive construction of loyalty. The processes of negotiation, accommodation and conflict, engaged in through online discourse, are important in laying bare the preferences, value systems and meanings that frame the experiences of loyal consumers.

Practical implications

This socially constructed view of loyalty facilitates a more sensitive and nuanced application of brand loyalty, with implications for segmentation and targeting activities. It provides a possible basis through which precise insights can be gained into the meanings and practices of loyal fans and consumers.

Originality/value

Examining loyalty through the lens of online music fandom enables a discursive understanding of consumers’ experience of brand loyalty. It shows how online engagement with other consumers of a brand facilitates a deep engagement with the notion of loyalty.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Daragh O’Reilly, Kathy Doherty, Elizabeth Carnegie and Gretchen Larsen

The purpose of this paper is to explore how music consumption communities remember their past. Specifically, the paper reports on the role of heritage in constructing the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how music consumption communities remember their past. Specifically, the paper reports on the role of heritage in constructing the cultural memory of a consumption community and on the implications for its identity and membership.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon insights from theories of cultural memory, heritage, and collective consumption, this interpretive inquiry makes use of interview, documentary, and artefactual analysis, as well as visual and observational data, to analyse an exhibition of the community’s popular music heritage entitled One Family – One Tribe: The Art & Artefacts of New Model Army.

Findings

The analysis shows how the community creates a sense of its own past and reflects this in memories, imagination, and the creative work of the band.

Research limitations/implications

This is a single case study, but one whose exploratory character provides fruitful insights into the relationship between cultural memory, imagination, heritage, and consumption communities.

Practical implications

The paper shows how consumption communities can do the work of social remembering and re-imagining of their own past, thus strengthening their identity through time.

Social implications

The study shows clearly how a consumption community can engage, through memory and imagination, with its own past, and indeed the past in general, and can draw upon material and other resources to heritagise its own particular sense of community and help to strengthen its identity and membership.

Originality/value

The paper offers a theoretical framework for the process by which music consumption communities construct their own past, and shows how theories of cultural memory and heritage can help to understand this important process. It also illustrates the importance of imagination, as well as memory, in this process.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Carsten Baumgarth and Daragh O’Reilly

The purposes of this editorial are first, to review the background to, and development of, the Special Issue call for papers issued in March 2013 on the topic of “Brands…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this editorial are first, to review the background to, and development of, the Special Issue call for papers issued in March 2013 on the topic of “Brands in the Arts and Culture Sector”, second, to introduce the eight papers in the double issue (seven in the Special Issue plus one paper (by Caldwell)) which was submitted to the journal in the normal course and whose topic fits well with the arts and cultural branding topic, and third, to set out a framework designed to facilitate the analysis of individual arts and cultural brands, as well as the directions for future research in the area.

Design/methodology/approach

The papers in this Special Issue use a variety of approaches-some qualitative (e.g. ethnography, expert interviews), others quantitative (e.g. laboratory experiment, surveys); others deal with conceptual issues for individual artists and for the arts market.

Findings

Findings and insights relate to topics such as: how the “in-between spaces” (e.g. art studios) can be key building blocks of a strong artist’s brand; the importance of western ideas for the Chinese art market; how pro-activeness, innovation, and risk-taking are the three key drivers for the decision to integrate blockbusters as a sub-brand in museum brand architecture; the importance of experiential design for low-involvement museum visitors; the utility of the notion of brand attachment in explaining volunteering; the potential of visual arts branding for general branding theory; the concept of millennial cultural consumers and how to reach them; and celebrity casting in London’s West End theatres.

Research limitations/implications

The authors believe that all of the papers have implications for future thinking, research, scholarship, paedagogy, and practice in the area of arts and cultural branding.

Originality/value

As far as the editors are aware, this is the first ever journal Special Issue on arts and cultural branding. More specifically, the authors have taken the opportunity to present in this editorial essay the “C-Framework” of arts and cultural brands, which offers a new way of thinking about arts and cultural brands − one which can accommodate classical or so-called “mainstream” branding ideas as well as insights from cultural, media, and consumer studies, and other disciplines. This framework can be applied to individual arts and cultural brands as well as to the entire field.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Gretchen Larsen and Daragh O'Reilly

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce the reader to the changing environment of arts marketing, which poses challenges to researchers and necessitates creative…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this Editorial is to introduce the reader to the changing environment of arts marketing, which poses challenges to researchers and necessitates creative methods of inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

The Editorial introduces the papers in this special issue.

Findings

It was found that creative inquiry in arts marketing includes the use of both established and innovative interpretive methods.

Originality/value

The Editorial explains how the application of creative methods of inquiry can aid our understanding of the relationship between art and the market.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2007

Daragh O'Reilly

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

David Jobber and Daragh O’Reilly

A literature review of techniques for raising response rates to industrial mail surveys identified six tried and tested methods. Experimental evidence shows considerable…

Abstract

A literature review of techniques for raising response rates to industrial mail surveys identified six tried and tested methods. Experimental evidence shows considerable support for a prior telephone call, pre‐paid monetary incentives, non‐monetary gifts (such as a pen), using stamps on return envelopes, granting anonymity to respondents and following up the initial mailing with a second covering letter and questionnaire. Gives indications of the likely rise in response rates. By examining the available evidence, users of industrial mail surveys can decide more confidently on their research strategy.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2011

Daragh O'Reilly

The purpose of this paper is to visually map the arts marketing journal literature.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to visually map the arts marketing journal literature.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive title and abstract search was carried out to identify literature on the relationship between art and the market. Papers were then classified by topic. Visual maps were drawn showing topic coverage in relevant areas.

Findings

The literature dealing with the relationship between art and the market is found to be extensive and multi‐disciplinary. The search found just over 1,500 papers.

Research limitations/implications

This was a mapping exercise rather than an analysis of the issues. Many different disciplines have a stake in understanding the art‐market relationship. Arts marketing scholars can benefit from engaging with research in this area, which is outside the marketing academy.

Practical implications

The maps provide a visual guide to the work, which has already been done across a wide range of disciplines and journals. They enable academic and professional readers to see where knowledge and insights may already exist and where work remains to be done.

Originality/value

Given the recent growth in arts marketing research, the paper provides a timely map of the territory.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Chloe Preece

The purpose of this paper is to examine the branding of the Cynical Realist and Political Pop contemporary art movements in China. The trajectory this brand has taken over…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the branding of the Cynical Realist and Political Pop contemporary art movements in China. The trajectory this brand has taken over the past 25 years reveals some of the power discourses that operate within the international visual arts market and how these are constructed, distributed and consumed.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of avant-garde art in China and its dissemination is undertaken through analysis of historical data and ethnographic data collected in Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong.

Findings

The analysis exposes the ideological framework within which the art market operates and how this affects the art that is produced within it. In the case of Cynical Realism and Political Pop, the art was framed and packaged by the art world to reflect Western liberal political thinking in terms of personal expression thereby implicitly justifying Western democratic, capitalist values.

Research limitations/implications

As an exploratory study, findings contribute to macro-marketing research by demonstrating how certain sociopolitical ideas develop and become naturalised through branding discourses in a market system.

Practical implications

A socio-cultural branding approach to the art market provides a macro-perspective in terms of the limitations and barriers for artists in taking their work to market.

Originality/value

While there have been various studies of branding in the art market, this study reveals the power discourses at work in the contemporary visual arts market in terms of the work that is promoted as “hot” by the art world. Branding here is shown to reflect politics by circulating and promoting certain sociocultural and political ideas.

Details

Arts Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-2084

Keywords

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