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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Zahra Seyedghorban, Danny Samson and Hossein Tahernejad

This research aims at investigating the common practical problem of how procurement can be transformed from tactical and administrative to becoming an organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims at investigating the common practical problem of how procurement can be transformed from tactical and administrative to becoming an organizational strategic partner and indeed a competitive weapon, using modern technologies in particular. We investigated how procurement can be reinvented, from being digitized to digitalized to digitally integrated, ultimately contributing in business terms beyond supply chain effectiveness but also to profit generation.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach was designed to investigate three firms, each at very different stages of digital maturity in procurement. Interviews with managers, investigation of processes and documentary materials and in-depth follow-up discussions were conducted.

Findings

The iterative digitalization transformation discovered encompasses complexities rooted in organizational structure, supply chain design and the management of the technology for employees' uptake. There are both operations and strategy implications as a result. This initial research phase led to mapping a model of digital maturity as well as identifying its underlying constructs.

Originality/value

This research discovered that the implementation of digital technologies can lead the procurement function of the supply chain to completely grow out of its administrative and clerical shell into a strategic, consultative, value-adding and potentially revenue-generating function, thereby contributing to the well-being of not only the supply chain but also the entire organization.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2018

Kathleen Bridget Wilson, Vikram Bhakoo and Danny Samson

The purpose of this paper is to link crowdsourcing, operations management (OM) and project management (PM). The study demonstrates how crowdsourcing as an open innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link crowdsourcing, operations management (OM) and project management (PM). The study demonstrates how crowdsourcing as an open innovation mechanism is operationalised within a complex PM context. Specifically, the study seeks to understand how crowdsourcing as a novel form of OM improves key outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted exploratory research involving five pure-play crowdsourcing firms based in the USA and Australia.

Findings

The findings indicate that the firms practise a form of crowdsourcing that allows flexible, efficient and low risk operations and links to contemporary notions of PM such as projectification and project society. The crowd can be used in a new manner to boost success factors tied to PM through open innovation and operational novelty. In terms of OM, crowdsourcing offers flexibility, speed, dynamism and scalability to project processes.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on five case studies. Further fine-grained, longitudinal research is required to fully understand this phenomenon in a wider range of contexts.

Practical implications

The paper contributes to practices tied to open innovation and provides guidance on how organisations might use large crowds to enhance PM success.

Originality/value

The study represents early scholarship on crowdsourcing and project operations. It makes three contributions. First, the authors introduce a new theoretical framework linking PM and novel aspects of crowdsourcing to extend understandings of projectification, as well as open innovation frameworks. Second, the authors showcase the flexibility and fluidity of the crowdsourcing project process. Third, the authors examine crowdsourcing operations in terms of size, efficiency and scalability which results in timely and efficient output due to innovative technology, along with the element of trust among stakeholders.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Milé Terziovski and Danny Samson

The purpose of this study was to test the effects of company size on the strength of the relationship between TQM and organisational performance. Based on a…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the effects of company size on the strength of the relationship between TQM and organisational performance. Based on a cross‐sectional study of manufacturing firms in Australia and New Zealand, the paper tests two hypotheses involving TQM and organisational performance. The central finding of the study is that TQM has a significant and positive relationship with most of the dimensions of organisational performance. The relationship weakened for defect rates and warranty costs when it was co‐varied for company size. We conclude that company size impedes the implementation of TQM. Larger companies tend to gain greater benefits from TQM than smaller firms. These findings are consistent with some of the literature. Overall, the findings show that a typical manufacturing organisation is more likely to achieve high organisational performance with TQM than without TQM. The findings have implications for managers wishing to formulate a business strategy based on TQM.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000001313. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/EUM0000000001313. When citing the article, please cite: Amrik S. Sohal, Liz Ramsay, Danny Samson, (1993), “JIT Manufacturing: Industry Analysis and a Methodology for Implementation”, International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Vol. 13 Iss: 7, pp. 22 - 56.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Allan Meers and Danny Samson

In this paper, we argue the success and sustainability of a business excellence (BE) initiative is influenced by (1) the contextual alignment of the initiative with the…

Abstract

In this paper, we argue the success and sustainability of a business excellence (BE) initiative is influenced by (1) the contextual alignment of the initiative with the organization’s competitive business strategy and (2) the level of congruence between the initiative and the organization’s operating environment and culture. To illustrate these dependencies, we present case studies of three Australasian organizations that initiated BE initiatives and failed to sustain their commitment to the process. The case studies highlight the need for further research into the nature and variety of organizational characteristics that either support or undermine BE as an improvement strategy. We conclude that organizations seeking to implement BE should undertake contextual analysis of their business strategy, operating environment and culture prior to implementing a BE initiative. We also suggest BE measurements provide little benefit to executives as they fail to identify the priorities associated with the improvement opportunities presented.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Helen De Cieri, Danny A. Samson and Amrik S. Sohal

The process of transition to Total Quality Management (TQM) at a major facility of a large Australian manufacturing company is described. The key steps taken by the…

Abstract

The process of transition to Total Quality Management (TQM) at a major facility of a large Australian manufacturing company is described. The key steps taken by the company as part of a process improvement model are also described. The difficulties experienced in implementing TQM and the critical success factors for TQM are presented.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Jit Seng Chan, Danny A. Samson and Amrik S. Sohal

The manufacturing techniques used by Japanese companies to providea competitive advantage have been shown by Japan′s outstanding economicperformance to be effective over a…

Abstract

The manufacturing techniques used by Japanese companies to provide a competitive advantage have been shown by Japan′s outstanding economic performance to be effective over a long period of time. This effectiveness can be measured in terms of the performance of manufacturing systems or by the way in which manufacturing effectiveness has been translated into success in the marketplace. In an effort to integrate current knowledge, a contextual model of Japanese manufacturing techniques has been constructed. These techniques are transferable from Japan. The key ingredient for success is to gain an understanding of the broad context of manufacturing culture, infrastructure and environment before expecting a transplanted or adapted Japanese system of manufacturing techniques to be effective.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 10 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Danny Samson

States that, although there has been considerable progress with the implementation of total quality management in Australia and New Zealand over the past 15 years since it

Abstract

States that, although there has been considerable progress with the implementation of total quality management in Australia and New Zealand over the past 15 years since it was pioneered in the manufacturing sector, there is still not a widespread acceptance and implementation of it. As a result, while the best companies in these countries are achieving high levels of competitiveness, the bulk of companies are still reporting mediocre performance in critically important areas such as customer satisfaction. Details how some of Australia and New Zealand’s leading companies have implemented quality improvement initiatives. Reports on a large survey of companies showing that on average, self‐reported measures of employee morale, customer satisfaction and the extent of dissemination of customer requirements throughout a workforce are particular areas for improvement.

Details

International Journal of Quality Science, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8538

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1993

Amrik S. Sohal, Liz Ramsay and Danny Samson

Sets out to determine whether or not JIT methods are applicable toAustralian manufacturers and if so, how they can be implementedsuccessfully. Presents a brief review of…

Abstract

Sets out to determine whether or not JIT methods are applicable to Australian manufacturers and if so, how they can be implemented successfully. Presents a brief review of the literature and highlights various definitions of JIT. Summarizes the aims and conclusions of 1980s research in Australian manufacturing. Examines the JIT experiences of 30 manufacturers, documenting programme details and the factors which contributed to their success. Offers recommendations for step‐by‐step JIT implementation in an Australian context.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2009

Christina Scott‐Young and Danny Samson

The purpose of this paper is to set out to identify key team factors associated with the fast implementation of capital projects. Although scholars theorise that project…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out to identify key team factors associated with the fast implementation of capital projects. Although scholars theorise that project success depends as much on the effective management of project personnel as on technical management, the project literature is virtually silent on which team practices are pivotal.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a model‐based quantitative research design, the impact of team management variables on the speed of two different phases of capital project implementation were examined: project execution and project construction. Multi‐method data collection included 252 individual surveys, archival documents, and whole team interviews conducted at the closeout of 56 capital projects implemented in four continents by 15 Fortune 500 companies in the process industries.

Findings

Empirical analysis revealed that only some of the variables predicted from other literatures (project manager – PM continuity, cross‐functional team integration, and PM incentives) were significantly linked to fast schedule outcomes. Some key drivers differed according to temporal phase.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study included its cross‐sectional design, modest sample size and sampling frame, but the findings clearly demonstrate the value of further research into key team factors for project success.

Practical implications

The results suggest that strategic management of project personnel can drive project speed. Phase‐linked key team practices are identified for improving time performance in capital projects.

Originality/value

This study breaks new ground by exploring whether key team practices are generic and phase‐specific, and by identifying specific team drivers of speed for two capital project phases using objective outcome measures.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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