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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Whitney H. Sherman, Danna M. Beaty, Karen S. Crum and April Peters

As women professors of educational leadership who are involved with feminist research and the preparation of k‐12 women leaders, the authors came to the realization that…

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Abstract

Purpose

As women professors of educational leadership who are involved with feminist research and the preparation of k‐12 women leaders, the authors came to the realization that while they have dedicated their professional lives to advancing women leaders in the k‐12 environment, they have neglected women like themselves, particularly young women, in the academy.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilized biographical narrative inquiry to allow readers a window into their lives as young women faculty in departments of educational leadership and extended this to advocate for changes in university climates for women.

Findings

The authors analyzed their narrative data to develop strategies for young women faculty in educational leadership that include: action‐oriented mentoring; the valuing of home and person; living within gender, age, and skin; and celebration of youth and womanhood.

Originality/value

This paper is an emergent approach to understanding and facilitating social justice and diversity in higher education based on four young women professors' attempt to find a creative and feminist outlet for the expression of their experiences in the academy. Little to no research exists outside of informal personal reports on young women's experiences in the academy and, thus, is the impetus for the paper.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

Whitney H. Sherman and Danna M. Beaty

As the number of internet users has increased, universities have begun to rely more heavily on technology in the delivery of course content and instruction. The use of…

1510

Abstract

Purpose

As the number of internet users has increased, universities have begun to rely more heavily on technology in the delivery of course content and instruction. The use of distance technology has been purported to have the potential to lead the way in developing more competent technology leaders in schools as well as reforming leadership preparation and reaching a more inclusive population of administrator aspirants. The paper aims to focus on the issues involved.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory study of how 49 higher education institutions in the USA utilize distance technology in the preparation of educational leaders is reported. Descriptive statistics, including both categorical scales and continuous scales, were collected from the survey designed and are used to indicate how and why technology was used in program delivery.

Findings

Findings are grouped according to the following themes: overall program structures; types of distance technology; goals for the use of distance technology; problems experienced with the use of distance technology; and factors that affect the expansion of the use of distance technology.

Practical implications

Data gained have important implications for follow‐up studies that explore the relationship between the use of distance technology and the transformation of the preparation of school leaders.

Originality/value

This research defines areas in which programs can meet today's global standards, allow for the greatest flexibility in meeting student needs, and yet continue to increase leadership and educational opportunities for all student groups.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Jared Friedman, Anthony Ian Jack, Kylie Rochford and Richard Boyatzis

Recent neuroscience research shows that two large-scale cortical networks are involved in organizational behavior. These two networks are naturally antagonistic – when one…

Abstract

Recent neuroscience research shows that two large-scale cortical networks are involved in organizational behavior. These two networks are naturally antagonistic – when one is active the other tends to be suppressed. The focus of the chapter is to apply the opposing-domains hypothesis to problems associated with: (1) trying to balance creative thinking and global processing with analytic reasoning and focused attention; (2) avoiding ethical dangers associated with an imbalance in task positive network (TPN) and default mode network (DMN) thinking; and (3) properly motivating and incentivizing employees so as not to lead to an imbalance between the TPN and DMN. We contend that the opposing-domains hypothesis can inform organizational and leadership theory in areas where single-dimensional dual-process models are inadequate.

Details

Organizational Neuroscience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-430-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Dragos Iliescu, Irina Macsinga, Coralia Sulea, Gabriel Fischmann, Tinne Vander Elst and Hans De Witte

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating effects of the broad personality traits associated with the five-factor model (FFM) of personality, on the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the moderating effects of the broad personality traits associated with the five-factor model (FFM) of personality, on the relationship between qualitative and quantitative job insecurity (JI) and physical and mental health complaints.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-report data collected in a cross-sectional study from a heterogeneous sample of 469 Romanian employees was analyzed with hierarchical regressions in order to identify moderation effects between each personality trait, JI and health outcomes.

Findings

Neuroticism and introversion amplify the relationship between JI and mental health complaints. None of the other personality traits showed any significant interaction with JI. No moderating effects were found for physical health complaints. Quantitative and qualitative JI show a high correlation and similar relationships with other variables, but may not be part of the same larger factor.

Practical implications

The FFM has a lower contribution than expected in explaining the JI-health dynamic, with only 2 out of 5 reaching significance. The personality traits of neuroticism and introversion function as moderately strong vulnerability factors in the JI-mental health relationship, and may be used by managers in identifying employees who are at risk in situations when JI is likely to appear.

Originality/value

The authors offer overall support for the main effect model in the relationship between JI and health, showing that, while some broad personality traits buffer the negative effect of JI in a fairly strong manner, this effect may be very difficult to completely abolish. The authors further show that quantitative and qualitative JI are very closely related facets of the broader JI construct.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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