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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Jianbin Chen and Danlin Chen

Urban MICE competitiveness research consists of two clusters, one that is public-statistics-based and another that is questionnaire-based. Supply-side research on urban MICE…

1602

Abstract

Purpose

Urban MICE competitiveness research consists of two clusters, one that is public-statistics-based and another that is questionnaire-based. Supply-side research on urban MICE competitiveness is rare. Based on the findings of Chen (2014) and other scholars, the purpose of this paper is to design counterpart statistical indicators to empirically analyze CMCA member cities.

Design/methodology/approach

After calculating the standardized Z value of the original statistical data for 17 CMCA member cities, the authors conducted confirmatory factor analysis for the first-level principal components, based on which hierarchical clustering was performed; then, regression analysis was conducted with the MICE profit factor as the dependent variable and the cost factor, tight support factor and facilitating factor as the independent variables to support publishing articles.

Findings

The confirmatory factor analysis showed that the urban MICE competitiveness indicators from the supply-side perspective include the profit factor, cost factor, tight support factor and facilitating factor.

Research limitations/implications

On the basis of research findings from the demand perspective and the literature review, the authors constructed an urban MICE competitiveness indicator system from the perspective of the supply side and conducted principal component analysis. However, because of the inaccessibility of panel data, the current data were only sufficient to conduct the research. If panel data could be acquired, further research could be conducted to perfect the current indicator system for urban MICE competitiveness.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that tourism total income, tourism foreign exchange income, inbound tourist number, number of exhibitions, exhibition area, number of UFI member cities and number of ICCA member cities were the main reason for the gap between different cities’ competitiveness and the reform focus for improving urban MICE competitiveness. The cost factor had a significantly negative influence on urban MICE competitiveness, implying that the higher the average hotel room price and revenue per available room, the less competitive the MICE host city is.

Social implications

The tight support factor exerts a significant positive influence on urban MICE competitiveness from the supply-side perspective, while the cost factor exerts a significant negative influence. The findings suggest that the tourism total income, tourism foreign exchange income, inbound tourist number, number of exhibitions, exhibition area, number of UFI member cities and number of ICCA member cities were the main reason for the gap between different cities’ competitiveness and the reform focus for improving urban MICE competitiveness. The cost factor had a significantly negative influence on urban MICE competitiveness, implying that the higher the average hotel room price and revenue per available room, the less competitive the MICE host city is.

Originality/value

The research bridge the empirical statistics and the questionnaire-based perception study on urban MICE tourism image, and advance to construct an empirical statistics based indicator system for urban MICE tourism image.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Lucy F. Ackert, Li Qi and Wenbo Zou

This study aims to report on experimental asset markets designed to examine the impact of a levy on trade, as well as the taxation authority’s ability to raise tax revenue when…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to report on experimental asset markets designed to examine the impact of a levy on trade, as well as the taxation authority’s ability to raise tax revenue when markets are subject to mispricing. Some have suggested that a transaction tax will discourage irrational speculation and lead to more efficient markets, but others argue that a higher cost of trading will prove to be an impediment to trade with no useful outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ goal is to provide insight on the impact of a transaction tax in a very specific asset market. The authors chose this design because the robustness of the bubble and crash pattern points to an environment that is particularly appropriate for the study of the effectiveness of a transaction tax in promoting efficient pricing. Furthermore, in a laboratory, the authors can control for extraneous factors that are problematic in the study of naturally occurring environments.

Findings

The authors examine whether a securities transaction tax promotes efficiency in markets that are prone to mispricing and find little evidence that a tax on trade will reduce speculation.

Research limitations/implications

This study’s experimental environment is, of course, an abstraction of naturally occurring markets and it may be that the model excludes important aspects.

Social implications

The authors find that a tax on financial transactions allows the taxation authority to raise significant revenue with little impact on pricing or trading volume.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first systematic examination of a transaction tax on outcomes in a market that is prone to mispricing.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2018

Michelle Turner, Christina Scott-Young and Sarah Holdsworth

Resilience development during university can increase the likelihood of positive employment outcomes for project management graduates in what is known as a stressful profession…

1034

Abstract

Purpose

Resilience development during university can increase the likelihood of positive employment outcomes for project management graduates in what is known as a stressful profession where the prevalence of project failure, job insecurity, and burnout is high. However, a focus on student resilience in project management education is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to address this gap by establishing a baseline profile of resilience for project management students, identifying priority areas of resilience development and exploring the relationship between resilience and well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 292 Australian students undertaking project management studies completed a survey comprising of the Resilience at University scale, the Short Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale and an item assessing sleep adequacy.

Findings

A resilience profile for undergraduate, postgraduate, male and female project management students was calculated. The resilience profile identified differences according to gender, and between undergraduate and postgraduate students. Mental well-being and adequate sleep were found to be significantly related to resilience.

Practical implications

Findings support the call for a greater emphasis on resilience development in the project management curriculum for undergraduates and postgraduates. One priority area likely to facilitate resilience is the ability to maintain perspective. As well as supporting academic achievement, it will assist graduates to navigate through complex, uncertain and challenging project environments.

Originality/value

This is the first known study of resilience for students undertaking project management studies in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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