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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Christine Nittrouer, Katharine Ridgway O’Brien, Michelle Hebl, Rachel C.E. Trump-Steele, Danielle M. Gardner and John Rodgers

There has been a great deal of research published on the lower success rates of women and underrepresented (UR) students in Science, technology, engineering, and…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been a great deal of research published on the lower success rates of women and underrepresented (UR) students in Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics-related (STEM) occupations. For biomedical scientists in particular, many of the obstacles to success occur during graduate training and may be related, at least in part, to certain demographic characteristics (i.e. gender or ethnicity). In particular, women and UR students may be positioned disproportionately into labs with fewer resources and less productive faculty advisors. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study examines the distribution of biomedical science graduate students into research laboratories, based on the gender and ethnicity of both students and faculty advisors. This is archival data that were collected via publicly available information on the internet.

Findings

Results indicate that female (vs male) students and UR (vs white and Asian) students are paired with advisors who are less successful (i.e. fewer publications, lower h-indices). Additionally, the data show patterns of homophily in that female (vs male) and white and Asian (vs UR) students are more likely to be paired with female and white and Asian advisors, respectively.

Originality/value

This research uses real-world, archival data to demonstrate that phenomena suggested in previous literature (e.g. less favorable pairings for female and UR students, homophilic pairings) occurs with this specific population.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Danielle M. Gardner, Caitlin Q. Briggs and Ann Marie Ryan

As COVID-19 cases rose in the US, so too did instances of discrimination against Asians. The current research seeks to understand and document discrimination toward Asians…

Abstract

Purpose

As COVID-19 cases rose in the US, so too did instances of discrimination against Asians. The current research seeks to understand and document discrimination toward Asians in the US specifically linked to the global pandemic (study 1). The authors test hypotheses based in social categorization and intergroup contact theories, demonstrating perceived pandemic blame is a mechanism for discrimination (study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

In study 1, the authors survey Asians living in the US regarding experiences and perceptions of COVID-19-related discrimination. In study 2, a two-time point survey examined whether participant perceptions of pandemic blame toward China predict discriminatory behavior toward Asians.

Findings

Study 1 demonstrated that 22.5% of US-residing Asians report personally encountering pandemic-related discrimination. Study 2 indicated that COVID-19 blame attributions toward China predicted anticipated hiring bias and increased physical distancing of Asians at work, associated with higher levels of US identification.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have theoretical implications for research on blame and stigmatization, as well as practical implications regarding bias mitigation.

Originality/value

The present studies advance understanding of event-based blame as a driver of prejudice and discrimination at work and suggest organizations attend to bias mitigation in conjunction with uncertainty reduction communications in challenging times.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Joshua Prasad, Danielle M. Gardner, Frederick T. Leong, Jinmei Zhang and Christopher D. Nye

This work contributes to the literature on career adaptability by examining the criterion validity of the Cooperation dimension, supporting the inclusion of cooperation…

Abstract

Purpose

This work contributes to the literature on career adaptability by examining the criterion validity of the Cooperation dimension, supporting the inclusion of cooperation into the career adaptability construct and informing the nomological network of career adaptability (Nye et al., 2018; Savickas and Porfeli, 2012). The authors also evaluate the improvements in cross-cultural generalizability argued for by Nye et al. (2018) by conducting a criterion validity study of the CAAS including cooperation using a non-Western sample.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey responses from a Chinese adult working sample (N = 208, 53.4% male) were analyzed via relative weights analysis, facilitating the comparison of the Cooperation dimension to other career adaptability dimensions and general adaptability.

Findings

Results demonstrate the added value of the Cooperation dimension across several work outcomes (i.e. work engagement, career commitment, occupational well-being, occupational stress) and highlight Cooperation in predicting interpersonal outcomes (i.e. supervisor and coworker satisfaction).

Originality/value

The inclusion of Cooperation, a dimension originally conceptualized as a career adaptability factor but only recently subjected to additional psychometric evaluation, within the career adaptability paradigm should promote both predictive validity and cross-cultural generalizability.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Danielle Morin and Mouna Hazgui

Three decades ago, the National Audit Office (NAO) in the UK acquired the powers to evaluate the extent that the British Administration was managed with economy…

Abstract

Purpose

Three decades ago, the National Audit Office (NAO) in the UK acquired the powers to evaluate the extent that the British Administration was managed with economy, efficiency and effectiveness. The NAO has since adopted a dual mission: to help Parliament hold government to account and to improve public service. This study aims to investigate value-for-money (VFM) auditors’ internalisation of a dual organisational identity: “obstructive” actions as representatives of a Supreme Audit Institution (SAI) and “enabling good practice”, induced by a will stated in the mission that the NAO authorities have adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

The organisational identity held and promoted by VFM auditors working at the NAO was explored in this research project. The authors specifically examined the understanding of those who claim to be serving both Parliament and organisations audited in their quest for performance improvement. The authors prompted the auditors to explain how they manage to reconcile these seemingly incompatible roles, namely, that of guardians and watchdogs who must publicly report gaps noted and that of assistants in government’s learning process. To this end, the authors conducted a field study at the NAO in September 2012 during which 21 auditors were interviewed individually and as part of two discussion groups.

Findings

The findings indicate that the auditors interviewed do not perceive a dichotomy in NAO’s double mission, which they believe to be congruent with their audience’s expectations. They draw meaning and usefulness from their role of monitoring the Administration if they believe they have contributed to improve public affairs management. In their view, the singular role of guardian no longer suffices. The authors conclude that VFM auditors’ recently acquired identity of “moderniser” reflects a self-efficacy expectation that prevents them from recognising the apparent paradox within their dual identity and that lets them fantasise about their real influence on the Administration.

Research limitations/implications

Admittedly, the limited number of auditors interviewed and who took part in discussion groups is not conducive to generalisation of the conclusions to all auditors in the NAO or to other SAIs. However, although modest in number, the auditor respondents have accumulated many years of VFM audit practice and have contributed to the production of many reports. The respondents could therefore rightfully speak of their work as VFM auditors and as representatives of an institution such as the NAO.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the debates about the place and role of SAIs in the control environment of Administrations. By soliciting testimonials from the actors working within the NAO, the authors could thus question certain a priori assumptions held by stakeholders in the political and administrative world for whom auditors are mere “watchdogs” of Administrations, and nothing more.

Originality/value

The dual mission that the NAO has adopted (similar to many other SAIs) has been formally and publicly stated. It was therefore worth investigating how experienced auditors such as those interviewed had internalised this mission. The authors argue that this dual mission, perhaps inspired by the managerialist culture that has shaped changes to the British Administration (and many other occidental Administrations) since the early 1980s and that is seemingly encouraged by Government, twists the legislator’s intentions, which are to consider SAIs’ auditors as guardians and watchdogs of Administrations, not as agents of change and improvement.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Soo Yeong Ewe, Christina Kwai Choi Lee and Ferdinand A. Gul

This study examines the effect of a regulatory-focused prime (i.e. a brochure with a picture and message) on the recommending behavior of investment advisers in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the effect of a regulatory-focused prime (i.e. a brochure with a picture and message) on the recommending behavior of investment advisers in the context of an investment decision.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted with 468 participants, mostly from the financial services industry. Study 1 examined the direct effect of a regulatory-focused prime on an investment adviser's recommending behavior, whereas Study 2 examined the moderating role of regulatory fit on such behavior. Study 3 validated the findings.

Findings

The results provide evidence that a message using visual and textual cues based on a promotion and prevention regulatory focus may trigger a preference in an investment adviser's product recommendation. A promotion (prevention)-focused framed message will trigger the recommendation of an investment plan with a higher but riskier (safe and stable) potential return. However, when the same prime is presented with details of a performance incentive scheme, the effect of the prime is reduced when there is a regulatory nonfit between the prime and the message relating to the performance incentive scheme.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the importance of understanding how regulatory-focused stimuli may subconsciously influence the recommendation of investment advisers as heuristics used in decision-making, thereby influencing their clients' investment decisions.

Originality/value

Past studies have focused on how regulatory-focused visual and message cues influence consumer decision-making. This study provides empirical evidence regarding the influence of regulatory-focused prime on an investment adviser's behavior when providing investment advice.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2020

Suailce Burke-Shyne, Danielle Gallegos and Tim Williams

To explore the nutrition opportunities and challenges for 3D food printing.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the nutrition opportunities and challenges for 3D food printing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative design, semi-structured interviews were conducted with experts from the field of nutrition or with a technical understanding of 3D food printing and a thematic analysis undertaken.

Findings

Four themes emerged: potential uses, sustainability, technical issues and ethical and social issues. The primary use identified was for texture-modified diets. Other uses include personalised nutrition and for novelty purposes. Interviewees indicated food printing may aid sustainability by reducing food waste, using food by-products and incorporating eco-friendly foods. The main technical issues were speed, cost and inability of the technology to move between textures. The latter is a limiting issue if the technology is purported to be used for texture-modified diets. Ethical and social issues raised included the acceptability and high degree of processing involved in printed foods.

Originality/value

This research highlights the need for nutrition issues to be considered as 3D food printing technology develops.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Danielle Cobb, Timothy W. Martin, Terrie Vasilopoulos, Erik W. Black and Chris R. Giordano

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a unique leadership curriculum developed at the University of Florida and its impact on the leadership skills and values of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a unique leadership curriculum developed at the University of Florida and its impact on the leadership skills and values of the anesthesiology residents since its conception. The authors instituted a voluntary anesthesiology residency leadership development program at their institution to fill a perceived gap in leadership training. Mounting evidence reveals that strong clinical leadership skills improve outcomes for patients and health-care institutions. Additionally, this growing body of literature indicates that optimal outcomes result from effective team behaviors and skills, which are directed through the requisite clinical leadership. Unfortunately, adding leadership training into the existing medical education curriculum is a formidable challenge regardless of the level of learner.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate learners, the authors used the Aspiring leaders in Healthcare-Empowering individuals, Achieving excellence, Developing talents instrument, which is a validated and reliable assessment of leadership competency in health-care professionals. In 2017, the authors surveyed the past five graduating classes from the department (classes of 2012-2016), using the two graduating classes before the program’s implementation as a historical control group.

Findings

The survey was sent to 96 people, of whom 70 responded (73 per cent). Those participants who usually or always participated in the program responded with higher leadership-readiness skills scores than those who occasionally, rarely or never participated in the program. Notably, those who had participated in another leadership development course at any time had higher skills scores than those who had never participated.

Originality/value

The study’s data provide evidence that residents who either, often or always participated in the leadership development program perceived themselves to be better equipped to become effective health-care leaders as opposed to residents who never, rarely or occasionally participated.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Seann M Dikkers

This study aims to review the development of six iterations of a master’s level course between the summers of 2013 and 2015, with a particular focus on the use of optional…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to review the development of six iterations of a master’s level course between the summers of 2013 and 2015, with a particular focus on the use of optional quests to engage and motivate student learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The comparative case study analysis draws on design-based research theory to consider learner activity, perceptions and commentary on course design.

Findings

Findings show students consistently exceeding expectations in the classroom, creating their own assignments, accepting custom challenges and, on average, sustaining a high regard for the learning process and format.

Practical implications

Positive results appear using free and available tools that can be adopted in any classroom setting.

Originality/value

Given the degree of voluntary engagement with course content, this local set of case studies implies that quest-based learning can drive an entire course design with positive results and provides a design model for others to adopt and build from.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Myra Piat, Kimberly Seida and Judith Sabetti

The purpose of this paper is to understand how daily life reflects the recovery journeys of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) living independently in the community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how daily life reflects the recovery journeys of individuals with serious mental illness (SMI) living independently in the community.

Design/methodology/approach

The go-along technique, which blends participant observation and interviewing, was used to gather data from 19 individuals with SMI living in supported housing. Data were analyzed through the CHIME framework of personal recovery, which includes social connectedness, hope and optimism, identity, meaning in life, and empowerment.

Findings

Applying the CHIME framework to qualitative data reveals the multiple ways in which everyday experiences, within and beyond formal mental healthcare environments, shapes personal recovery processes.

Research limitations/implications

Combining novel methods and conceptual frameworks to lived experiences sharpens extant knowledge of the active and non-linear aspects to personal recovery. The role of the researcher must be critically considered when using go-along methods.

Practical implications

Practitioners working with this population should account for the role of socially supportive and financially accessible spaces and activities that support the daily work of recovery beyond the context of formal care and services.

Originality/value

This study utilizes an innovative method to illustrate the crucial role of daily and seemingly banal experiences in fostering or hindering personal recovery processes. It is also the one of the first studies to comprehensively apply the CHIME framework to qualitative data in order to understand the recovery journeys of individuals with SMI living in supported housing.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 February 2020

John Knights, Danielle Grant and Greg Young

It is becoming more generally accepted that there is a need to develop a new kind of leader to meet the needs of our 21st century VUCA world. The bookcases are full of…

Abstract

Purpose

It is becoming more generally accepted that there is a need to develop a new kind of leader to meet the needs of our 21st century VUCA world. The bookcases are full of volumes that describe “what” great leaders should do, but “how” to develop such leaders is usually limited to a macro or systemic solution rather than focusing on granular behavioural change of the individual. This paper describes the qualities and characteristics of Transpersonal Leaders, then focuses on developing these leaders through a new coaching process and finally explains how experienced coaches can be trained to coach these leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

Our research over the last 20 years of working with leaders individually and in teams has focused on this issue. We have been developing “21st century ready” leaders, referred to as Transpersonal Leaders, for over 10 years in teams, but only recently have we been developing such leaders through a new coaching process. We have also developed a methodology that codifies the development of Transpersonal Leaders which, in turn, allows us to replicate the programme by training other professionals, potentially in large numbers.

Findings

Graduates of the Transpersonal Coach Training Programme say that it has been a transformational personal experience, enabling them to take their leader clients to a new level. Leaders who have been coached say the programme has equipped them to learn a practical approach to becoming an authentic, ethical, caring and more effective leader.

Originality/value

This is a unique approach to coaching leaders but based on proven learning principles.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

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