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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2006

Danielle E. Warren

Ethics initiatives are commonly used by organizations to influence members’ behavior with the expressed goal of aligning the behavior exhibited in the organization with…

Abstract

Ethics initiatives are commonly used by organizations to influence members’ behavior with the expressed goal of aligning the behavior exhibited in the organization with the organization's stated rules and values (Laufer & Robertson, 1997; Schwartz, 2002; Tenbrunsel, Smith-Crowe, & Umphress, 2003; Trevino, Weaver, Gibson, & Toffler, 1999; Weaver, Trevino, & Cochran, 1999a, 1999b, 1999c). It is hoped that by emphasizing the organization's values and rules, organization members will be more thoughtful about their work behavior and consider these values and rules when making decisions at work.

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Ethics in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-405-8

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Abstract

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The Next Phase of Business Ethics: Integrating Psychology and Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-809-5

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2006

Abstract

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Ethics in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-405-8

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2001

John W. Dienhart, Ronald F. Duska and Dennis J. Moberg

Abstract

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The Next Phase of Business Ethics: Integrating Psychology and Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-809-5

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Danielle Mantovani, Eduardo B. Andrade and Paulo H.M. Prado

Previous research has investigated how performance outcome impacts effort and subsequent goal pursuit. However, little is known about the incidental impact of goal…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has investigated how performance outcome impacts effort and subsequent goal pursuit. However, little is known about the incidental impact of goal (non)attainment on consumer preference via changes in regulatory focus. This paper aims to suggest that performance feedback has a direct impact on consumers’ regulatory focus, which in turn influences their attitudes and preferences toward future events. Additionally, the authors assess the extent to which emotions arising out of goal (non)attainment play a critical role in the process.

Design/methodology/approach

In a series of three experiments, this paper demonstrates that goal (non)attainment induces a specific regulatory focus, which in turn interacts with the frame of an upcoming advertisement to impact consumer preference.

Findings

This research demonstrates that previous goal (non)attainment interacts with the framing of an upcoming message (promotion vs prevention) and impacts consumer preference. The authors also find initial evidence for the role of emotions on the relationship between goal (non) attainment and preferences for regulatory-focused message frames.

Practical implications

The findings have important implications because they reveal consumers’ preferences after goal (non)attainment.

Originality/value

This study complements prior research by integrating two research streams (goal pursuit and regulatory focus) to address an open question of whether/how goal (non)attainment impacts message persuasiveness and consumer preference through changes in regulatory focus. Therefore, this research is intended to contribute to the literature by addressing the interacting effects of goal attainment and regulatory focus on consumer decisions and the role of emotions in this process.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2018

John Buschman

Library and Information Science (LIS) has seen an explosion of responses to fake news in the aftermath of the 2016 US election, political in nature, eschewing “neutrality”…

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Abstract

Purpose

Library and Information Science (LIS) has seen an explosion of responses to fake news in the aftermath of the 2016 US election, political in nature, eschewing “neutrality” supporting democracy. The purpose of this paper is to trace the definition of fake news, the challenges, the roots of recent respondes to fake news, notes that the theoretical understanding of democracy must keep pace with these efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

Conceptual analysis of the LIS literature concerning fake news and its underlying themes; unpacking of actually existing democracy, re-linked to LIS practices.

Findings

Democracy does not require a space cleared of distorting claims but spaces suited to grappling with them, a call to address fake news, and not simply a matter of clearing up information sources; librarians should prepared to engage at the next level. Libraries stand for the proposition that there is more-true information which is worth accessing, organizing, etc., and for inclusion. Whether explicitly political or not, the imaginative uses to which libraries are put do enrich civil society and the public sphere. Libraries help to counter fake news both through specific educative actions aimed at it and as broadly educative institutions with a coherent notion of their relationship to informational discernment in democracy.

Originality/value

LIS discourse on fake news has value, and references democracy, but assumes a set of traditional relationships between informing, libraries and democracy. This paper goes at both the lesser role of informing and highlights the (arguably) greater social role of libraries in democratic society.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Book part
Publication date: 31 May 2016

Ana María Munar

This chapter introduces a metaphor—the house—and applies Habermas’ philosophy to examine the environment where knowledge production takes place. The analysis shows the…

Abstract

This chapter introduces a metaphor—the house—and applies Habermas’ philosophy to examine the environment where knowledge production takes place. The analysis shows the dominance of “the systemic paradigm,” which is characterized by increased bureaucratization and commercialization. This paradigm has severe consequences for two core features of universities: the open-ended search for deeper understanding and the principle of autonomy. The chapter advances the idea of reclaiming the political dimension of the epistemic endeavor and presents a series of initiatives which help to advance tourism scholarship by non-conforming to the steering conditions of this paradigm and instead reclaiming the personal and subjective; promoting multiple knowledges; and building alternative platforms of knowledge production, cooperation, and dissemination.

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Tourism Research Paradigms: Critical and Emergent Knowledges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-929-4

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Book part
Publication date: 15 April 2019

Damon Jack Clark

This qualitative study researches the concept of entrepreneurship in an indigenous population by assessing the external and internal challenges entrepreneurs face…

Abstract

This qualitative study researches the concept of entrepreneurship in an indigenous population by assessing the external and internal challenges entrepreneurs face, discusses the various types of support offered, and compiles recommendations for partners to understand the Diné entrepreneur. This research interviewed nine enrolled members of the Navajo Nation tribe who have either created businesses on the reservations, managed non-profits aimed at supporting entrepreneurs, or possessed a wealth of entrepreneurial experiences working both on or off the Navajo Nation Reservation. This text builds upon the themes of economic development, cultural-match, and indigenous sovereignty by analyzing the concept, action, and future of Diné entrepreneurship.

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Danielle Cooper and Warren Watson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of two moderators of the relationships between affective conflict and cognitive conflict and team performance: the…

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2147

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of two moderators of the relationships between affective conflict and cognitive conflict and team performance: the cultural context and the level of team‐oriented behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey questionnaires were administered to a sample of 143 Mexico‐ and US‐based learning teams. Regression analysis was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

In both cultural contexts, cognitive conflict more positively affected performance when team‐oriented behaviors were high. This effect was stronger for Mexican teams. Affective conflict more negatively affected performance in Mexican teams than US teams, particularly when team‐oriented behaviors were high.

Practical implications

The results have implications for managing conflict to improve team effectiveness in the USA and in Mexico and for training managers who work across these cultural contexts.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates the joint role of the cultural context and team behaviors in how conflict influences team performance.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Robert H. Herz

Abstract

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More Accounting Changes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-629-1

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