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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Truus Poels, Danielle A. Tucker and Joop Kielema

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to understand organisational rhythm as a stimulus for further study into organisational change.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a framework to understand organisational rhythm as a stimulus for further study into organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper studies the experiences of the medical discipline colleges in the Netherlands as they underwent significant reorganisation and transfer of ministerial authority. The data set consists of correspondence, reports and tapes of the meetings over 14 months and interviews with 26 employees.

Findings

This research identified five sub-themes of rhythm (emphasis, intonation, pace, period and repetition). Putting these together, the authors present a framework to understand organisational rhythm during organisational change.

Research limitations/implications

This study begins to develop understanding of how rhythms function but the authors did not compare multiple rhythms in this study.

Practical implications

The authors argue that by unpacking and exploring in more detail the sub-themes of rhythm (emphasis, intonation, pace, period and repetition), the authors can help to explain why complex change management initiatives may stall or fail to gain traction. By understanding the concept of rhythm as movement, the authors can offer recommendations to organisations about how to move forward and overcome challenges associated with progress.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors make an important distinction between rhythm in terms of movement and flow of activity, which has often been overlooked by research, which focusses on the temporal aspects of organisations, which the authors classify as frequency – relating to the sequencing and duration of change.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Danielle A. Tucker and Stefano Cirella

In the context of organizational change, identifying, and organizing the various roles of change agents remains a challenge for practitioners and scholars alike. This…

Abstract

In the context of organizational change, identifying, and organizing the various roles of change agents remains a challenge for practitioners and scholars alike. This chapter examines how different agents can enable an effective change process. Empirical evidence from three hospitals illustrates the process of transformation and its underlying arrangements to identify agents and their roles. The findings underline the importance of designing a coherent system of agents, determining where they come from, their role during the process, and how this may change throughout the change process. Managerial choices in the cases are discussed, leading to implications for theory and practice.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Philip Hancock and Danielle A. Tucker

Radical notions of recognition at work have not been considered widely in respect of organizational change. This article examines the introduction of a change programme…

Abstract

Purpose

Radical notions of recognition at work have not been considered widely in respect of organizational change. This article examines the introduction of a change programme across two UK police departments, during which front-line officers were actively involved and consulted throughout its pilot phase. The purpose of this article is to consider the question of whether or not a perceived sense of recognition amongst officers contributed to the success of this initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

The research utilizes qualitative data derived from individual interviews, focus groups and observations, gathered over one year, within two UK police departments. The data was analysed thematically. Reflection, and an ongoing discussion with officers, led to a theoretical exploration of recognition in order to explore the apparent success of the programme.

Findings

Recognition, consisting of a sense of love, respect and esteem, appears to offer a notable impetus to the acceptance of a change programme within a traditionally change averse organization. Resistance to organizational change may be better addressed through a strategy that seeks to actively promote the claims to recognition of organizational members, particularly through the extension of a right to participate within the context of a supportive and protective culture of engagement.

Originality/value

The article utilizes the novel, but increasingly utilized, theory of recognition to analyse and explain positive employee involvement in a change programme within the police. An approach that helped to achieve change in a widely acknowledged change-resistant organization.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Danielle A. Tucker, Jane Hendy and James Barlow

As management innovations become more complex, infrastructure needs to change in order to accommodate new work practices. Different challenges are associated with work…

Abstract

Purpose

As management innovations become more complex, infrastructure needs to change in order to accommodate new work practices. Different challenges are associated with work practice redesign and infrastructure change however; combining these presents a dual challenge and additional challenges associated with this interaction. The purpose of this paper is to ask: what are the challenges which arise from work practice redesign, infrastructure change and simultaneously attempting both in a single transformation?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a longitudinal study of three hospitals in three different countries (UK, USA and Canada) transforming both their infrastructure and work practices. Data consists of 155 ethnographic interviews complemented by 205 documents and 36 hours of observations collected over two phases for each case study.

Findings

This paper identifies that work practice redesign challenges the cognitive load of organizational members whilst infrastructure change challenges the project management and structure of the organization. Simultaneous transformation represents a disconnect between the two aspects of change resulting in a failure to understand the relationship between work and design.

Practical implications

These challenges suggest that organizations need to make a distinction between the two aspects of transformation and understand the unique tensions of simultaneously tackling these dual challenges. They must ensure that they have adequate skills and resources with which to build this distinction into their change planning.

Originality/value

This paper unpacks two different aspects of complex change and considers the neglected challenges associated with modern change management objectives.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Danielle A Tucker, Jane Hendy and James Barlow

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what happens when a lack of role-sending results in ambiguous change agent roles during a large scale organisational…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate what happens when a lack of role-sending results in ambiguous change agent roles during a large scale organisational reconfiguration. The authors consider the role of sensemaking in resolving role ambiguity of middle manager change agents and the consequences of this for organisational restructuring.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a case study analysis of significant organisational reconfiguration across a local National Health Service Trust in the UK. Data consists of 82 interviews, complemented by analysis of over 100 documents and field notes from 51 hours of observations collected over five phases covering a three year period before, during and after the reconfiguration. An inductive qualitative analysis revealed the sensemaking processes by which ambiguity in role definition was resolved.

Findings

The data explains how change agents collectively make sense of a role in their own way, drawing on their own experiences and views as well as cues from other organisational members. The authors also identified the organisational outcomes which resulted from this freedom in sensemaking. This study demonstrates that by leaving too much flexibility in the definition of the role, agents developed their own sensemaking which was subsequently very difficult to manipulate.

Practical implications

In creating new roles, management first needs to have a realistic vision of the task and roles that their agents will perform, and second, to communicate these expectations to both those responsible for recruiting these roles and to the agents themselves.

Originality/value

Much of the focus in sensemaking research has been on the importance of change agents’ sensemaking of the change but there has been little focus on how change agents sensemake their own role in the change.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Slawomir Magala

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205

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Abstract

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2021

Angelina Zubac, Marie Dasborough, Kate Hughes, Zhou Jiang, Shelley Kirkpatrick, Maris G. Martinsons, Danielle Tucker and Ofer Zwikael

The aim of this special issue is to better understand the strategy and change interface, in particular, the (sub)processes and cognitions that enable strategies to be…

Abstract

The aim of this special issue is to better understand the strategy and change interface, in particular, the (sub)processes and cognitions that enable strategies to be successfully implemented and organizations effectively changed. The ten papers selected for this special issue reflect a range of scholarly traditions and, thus, as our review and integration of the relevant literatures, and our introductions to the ten papers demonstrate, they shed light on the strategy and change interface in starkly different ways. Collectively, the papers give us more insight into the recursive activities, and structural, organizational learning and cognitive mechanisms that are encouraged or deliberately established at organizations to allow their people to successfully implement a strategy and effect change, including achieve greater levels of horizontal alignment. Moreover, they demonstrate the benefits associated with establishing platforms and/or routines designed to overcome decision-makers’ cognitive shortcomings while implementing a strategy or making timely adjustments to it. We conclude our editorial by identifying some yet unanswered questions.

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Pamela Yeow, Alison Dean, Danielle Tucker and Linda Pomeroy

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of “multiplex” (multiple overlapping) networks and leadership on group performance in a higher education setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effect of “multiplex” (multiple overlapping) networks and leadership on group performance in a higher education setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a combination of social network analysis and interviews, the authors employ a case study approach to map the connections between academic group members. This paper analyses the relationship between this mapping and academic performance.

Findings

The authors identified two dimensions which influence group effectiveness: multiplex networks and distributed–coordinated leadership. Where networks are built across tasks, inter-relationships develop that lead to greater group performance.

Practical implications

Where group members create a dense hive of interconnectivity and are active across all group tasks, and also informally, this increases the opportunity for knowledge sharing. When this is similarly experienced by a majority of group members, there is positive reinforcement, resulting in greater group effectiveness.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the importance of the richness of formal ties in knowledge-intensive settings. This paper is the first to differentiate between formal connections between colleagues related to different tasks within their role. This suggests that dense configurations of informal ties are insufficient; they must be coupled with strong ties around formal activity and demonstrative leadership.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

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