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Article
Publication date: 30 December 2019

Daniela Fishbein, Siddhartha Nambiar, Kendall McKenzie, Maria Mayorga, Kristen Miller, Kevin Tran, Laura Schubel, Joseph Agor, Tracy Kim and Muge Capan

Workload is a critical concept in the evaluation of performance and quality in healthcare systems, but its definition relies on the perspective (e.g. individual…

Abstract

Purpose

Workload is a critical concept in the evaluation of performance and quality in healthcare systems, but its definition relies on the perspective (e.g. individual clinician-level vs unit-level workload) and type of available metrics (e.g. objective vs subjective measures). The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of objective measures of workload associated with direct care delivery in tertiary healthcare settings, with a focus on measures that can be obtained from electronic records to inform operationalization of workload measurement.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant papers published between January 2008 and July 2018 were identified through a search in Pubmed and Compendex databases using the Sample, Phenomenon of Interest, Design, Evaluation, Research Type framework. Identified measures were classified into four levels of workload: task, patient, clinician and unit.

Findings

Of 30 papers reviewed, 9 used task-level metrics, 14 used patient-level metrics, 7 used clinician-level metrics and 20 used unit-level metrics. Key objective measures of workload include: patient turnover (n=9), volume of patients (n=6), acuity (n=6), nurse-to-patient ratios (n=5) and direct care time (n=5). Several methods for operationalization of these metrics into measurement tools were identified.

Originality/value

This review highlights the key objective workload measures available in electronic records that can be utilized to develop an operational approach for quantifying workload. Insights gained from this review can inform the design of processes to track workload and mitigate the effects of increased workload on patient outcomes and clinician performance.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Migrant Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-491-5

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Muhammad Mehedi Masud, Md Rajibul Ahsan, Noor Azina Ismail and Md Sohel Rana

Life insurance remains an essential part of financial and social security. The insurance penetration rate is high in the developed countries but very low in developing…

Abstract

Purpose

Life insurance remains an essential part of financial and social security. The insurance penetration rate is high in the developed countries but very low in developing countries such as Malaysia, with only 4.8% penetration and extremely low underwritings. Therefore, this study aims to scrutinize the underlying determinants of a household purchase behaviour of life insurance.

Design/methodology/approach

The data generated from the administration of survey questionnaires to 325 households were analysed, using structural equation modelling to obtain the research purposes.

Findings

The analysis reveals that the knowledge of life insurance, attitudes towards life insurance, subjective norms (SN), trust and risk perception, affect the tendency of a household to purchase life insurance. The results of this study also highlight that households’ purchase-propensity influences the purchase behaviour of life insurance. Concurrently, the intention to purchase has mediating effects on explanatory variables and purchase behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper established awareness, SN, perceived behavioural control, trust and risk perception as the key determinants promoting positive attitudes towards purchasing life insurance. The findings of this study can be successfully applied to different stakeholders in a similar context. This study suggests that the managers of life insurance companies should adjust their policy guidelines in accordance with the positive relationship between the constructs and consumers’ intention to purchase life insurance.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 29 May 2009

Erich J. Schwarz, Malgorzata A. Wdowiak, Daniela A. Almer‐Jarz and Robert J. Breitenecker

The purpose of this paper is to examine key factors influencing students' intent to create a new venture. Based on Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour and Autio's model of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine key factors influencing students' intent to create a new venture. Based on Ajzen's theory of planned behaviour and Autio's model of intention, it aims to develop a model of entrepreneurial intent that incorporates both human and environmental factors. Specifically, the proposed model aims to focus on three constructs to predict the entrepreneurial intent, i.e. general attitudes (toward money, change, and competiveness), the attitude toward entrepreneurship, and the perception of the university environment and regional start‐up infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

In June 2005, 35,040 students of medicine, law, and technical, natural, social and business science from seven universities in Austria (electronic survey) were contacted. The response rate was 8.10 per cent. A total of 2,124 cases were considered in the final analysis. A multiple linear regression model with attitudes, perceptions of environment conditions, and selected control variables (age, gender, field of study) was estimated to test the hypotheses.

Findings

With the exception of the attitude toward competitiveness, all other paths regarding general and specific attitudes are significant. Pertaining to the environment conditions, only significant effects of the university on students' interest in business founding were detected. Other environment factors have no impact on entrepreneurial intention among students in Austria. In addition to that, significant differences in entrepreneurial intent regarding age, gender and field of study were found. Despite variation in the intent level between students of different fields of study, any significant differences in the effects of predictor variables on the entrepreneurial intent among the investigated student population were not discovered.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should place more emphasis on interaction between personal and environmental factors. Besides, students' social networks (family and friends) should be included in the analysis of entrepreneurial career decision. Practical implications – The universities in Austria should more extensively address entrepreneurship education to students of other subjects than business sciences. An important component of entrepreneurial training is a social learning process. In this respect, inviting successful entrepreneurs (role models) to the lectures or enabling students small business experience via interaction with local entrepreneurs can be viewed as supportive actions. Developing entrepreneurial skills as crucial life capacities should be the main target of all university faculties.

Originality/value

The paper lays the foundation for a better understanding of the “intent preconditions” in the context of new venture creation, particularly in the context of Austrian students.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Ana Carolina de Aguiar Rodrigues, Antonio Virgílio Bittencourt Bastos, Daniela Campos Bahia Moscon and Giselle Cavalcante Queiroz

Is it possible to consider organizational entrenchment (OE) and continued commitment (CC) as the same phenomenon? Are there enough differences between CC and affective…

Abstract

Purpose

Is it possible to consider organizational entrenchment (OE) and continued commitment (CC) as the same phenomenon? Are there enough differences between CC and affective commitment (AC) to defend that they cannot be part of the same construct? The objective of this study was to examine the convergence of validated measures between OE and CC and their discrimination to AC. The authors’ aim was to compare two models of antecedents and their consequences: the model that includes OE and AC, and the one that includes CC and AC.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 1,648 respondents (the majority lived in the Northeast region of Brazil, worked in private services companies, were female, single, under 35 years old, had, at least, begun college studies and received up to five times the minimum wage). A six-point Likert scale was used in this study. To measure OE, CC and AC, the authors used reduced versions of validated measures. To test the hypotheses, first, the authors used Pearson's correlation analysis and then, structural equation modeling, comparing two models of antecedents and consequences (one including OE and AC, and the other, including CC and AC).

Findings

As expected, affective commitment had a positive impact on the desired behavior (intention for commitment, defense, staying), whereas entrenchment and continuance commitment had a negative or non-significant impact on these behaviors. Results show the existence of a conceptual and empirical overlap between organizational entrenchment and continuance commitment and indicate that the continuance dimension is not part of commitment but rather part of organizational entrenchment.

Research limitations/implications

The fact that this is a cross-sectional study sets a limitation on the results, for not allowing greater understanding of the dynamics and the causal direction of relationships. Additionally, it follows the trend of studies in the organizational behavior field of utilizing self-reported data, which results in problems related to perceptual bias (Morrow, 2011).

Practical implications

The practical implications of this study regard a greater clarification on which behaviors are expected from either committed and entrenched workers, and which drivers may lead to each of these bonds. Therefore, a better understanding of the phenomenon contributes to the training of managers and to the design of organizational policies and practices.

Social implications

The clarity of bonds also allows its application to different contexts beyond business organizations, as a step to reach better understanding of commitment and entrenchment in different settings, economical and national realities.

Originality/value

It is expected that these findings add a higher precision to the research on commitment, thus contributing to the validity of the measures. Given these results and confirmation that OE and CC represent the same bond, it is considered appropriate to designate this type of bond simply as OE. Additionally, the results of this study represent a further argument in favor of prioritizing the AC than CC in research and in management of organizational commitment.

Details

Revista de Gestão, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1809-2276

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Silvia Sanz-Blas, Enrique Bigné and Daniela Buzova

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of the following variables: brand fan page dependency; parasocial interaction; attitude towards brand fan pages in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of the following variables: brand fan page dependency; parasocial interaction; attitude towards brand fan pages in enhancing users’ participation in Facebook as a mobile social network (m-WOM).

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was carried out by means of online interviews with structured questionnaires. To analyse the data, and estimate the hypothesised relationships in the theoretical model, the partial least squares equation modelling was used.

Findings

The results of the study indicate that accessing brands’ mobile Facebook fan pages can satisfy the needs of understanding, orientation and play. These needs, in turn, influence users’ attitude, as well as their active and passive participation. Besides, users’ active participation in brands’ fan pages is enhanced by the direct and positive influence of attitude and passive participation.

Practical implications

This research enables brands to know which aspects to highlight in their communication strategies in order to increase the user’s active participation and generate m-WOM. Brands need to post information which is not only relevant, but also entertaining and visually attractive. Furthermore, they should foster the user-brand interaction to achieve users’ engagement with the brand.

Originality/value

The contribution of the present research is threefold. First, it offers a new perspective in explaining eWOM participation in mobile settings based on social networks. Second, it is argued that dependency is a key driver in explaining m-WOM. Lastly, integrating parasocial integration in the authors’ model highlights the communication nature of the word-of-mouth process.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 41 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Inger Anne Tøndel, Martin Gilje Jaatun, Daniela Soares Cruzes and Laurie Williams

Today, agile software development teams in general do not adopt security risk-assessment practices in an ongoing manner to prioritize security work. Protection Poker is a…

Abstract

Purpose

Today, agile software development teams in general do not adopt security risk-assessment practices in an ongoing manner to prioritize security work. Protection Poker is a collaborative and lightweight software security risk-estimation technique that is particularly suited for agile teams. Motivated by a desire to understand why security risk assessments have not yet gained widespread adoption in agile development, this study aims to assess to what extent the Protection Poker game would be accepted by agile teams and how it can be successfully integrated into the agile practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Protection Poker was studied in capstone projects, in teams doing a graduate software security course and in sessions with industry representatives. Data were collected via questionnaires, observations and group interviews.

Findings

Results show that Protection Poker has the potential to be adopted by agile teams. Key benefits include good discussions on security and the development project, along with increased knowledge and awareness. Challenges include ensuring efficient use of time and gaining impact on the end product.

Research limitations/implications

Using students allowed easy access to subjects and an ability to collect rich data over time, but at the cost of generalizability to professional settings. Results from interactions with professionals supplement the data from students, showing similarities and differences in their opinions on Protection Poker.

Originality/value

The paper proposes ways to tackle the main obstacles to the adoption of the Protection Poker technique, as identified in this study.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2014

Daniela Andreini, Giuseppe Pedeliento, Mara Bergamaschi and Jari Salo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cross-effects of on-site sponsorship on online sponsorship effectiveness in communities. The research evaluates how…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cross-effects of on-site sponsorship on online sponsorship effectiveness in communities. The research evaluates how members’ commitment to a sports-oriented community and attitude to brands providing sponsorship developed through sponsorship on-site, and sponsor-community fit, influence the effectiveness of online sponsorship measured as the intention to purchase the same brands online through sponsoring banners displayed on the community web site.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a web-survey from a self-selected sample of 272 respondents belonging to non-professional sports communities. By drawing on the principal tenets of the theory of reasoned action, the authors developed a theoretical framework and tested it through a structural equation model to evaluate the role of attitude to sponsor brands developed through sponsorship on-site, and its antecedents, on the intention to purchase the same brands online through sponsoring banners exposed on the community web site.

Findings

The attitude to sponsor brands developed through sponsorship on-site affects the intention to make online purchases of the same brands through sponsoring banners exposed on the web sites of non-professional communities. On the other hand, antecedents of sponsorship on-site, that is, sponsor-community fit and commitment to the community, affect the intention to purchase the same brands online through sponsor banners displayed on the community web site, with attitude playing a different mediating role.

Practical implications

The research contributes to sponsorship literature by establishing the existence of cross-effects of on-site sponsorship on online sponsorship effectiveness and providing insights into the central role of commitment and attitude developed on-site. Managerially, non-professional communities emerge as attractive targets for multiple sponsorship investment owing to their on-site and online social interaction that offers managers an opportunity to exploit sponsorship cross-effects.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the scant body of knowledge on the cross-effects of on-site sponsorship on online sponsorship and provides insights into the importance of communities as a beneficial target of sponsorship investment.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Manfred Bruhn, Verena Schoenmueller and Daniela B. Schäfer

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relative impact of brand communication on brand equity through social media as compared to traditional media. In a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relative impact of brand communication on brand equity through social media as compared to traditional media. In a juxtaposition of different industries it aims at: investigating whether both communication instruments have an impact on consumer‐based brand equity; comparing the effect sizes of these two communication instruments; and separating the effects of firm‐created and user‐generated social media communication.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 393 data sets from three different industries, namely tourism, telecommunications, and pharmaceuticals, were generated using a standardized online‐survey. Structural equation modeling was used in the analysis of the data obtained to investigate the interplay of social media and traditional media in general, as well as in an examination of industry‐specific differences.

Findings

The results of the empirical study show that both traditional communications and social media communications have a significant impact on brand equity. While traditional media has a stronger impact on brand awareness, social media communications strongly influence brand image. Firm‐created social media communication is shown to have an important impact on functional brand image, while user‐generated social media communication exerts a major influence on hedonic brand image. Furthermore, the present study highlights significant differences between the industries under investigation.

Originality/value

The research described in this paper is pioneering in that it juxtaposes the impacts of social media and traditional media on brand equity – a topic of increasing interest to firms in the era of Facebook and Twitter but so far largely uninvestigated. Moreover, the differentiation between firm‐created and user‐generated social media communication, which is gaining increasingly in importance, as companies see their brand marketing power devolve to the consumer through social media platforms, offers valuable insights to marketing practitioners and academics.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Giuseppe Pedeliento, Daniela Andreini, Mara Bergamaschi and Jane Elizabeth Klobas

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how the intermediation of an online agent in the relationship between prospective clients and professional service providers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate how the intermediation of an online agent in the relationship between prospective clients and professional service providers affects individual purchasing processes and decisions, and satisfaction with the professional service provider once the commercial transaction is concluded.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the integrated trust-technology acceptance model, modified to include two additional variables to take into account of the specificities of the context investigated – users’ perceived reduction of information asymmetry and satisfaction with the professional service provider – a research framework is developed and tested with a research design combining a decision tree procedure with structural equation modelling and multi-group analysis. Participants are 188 users of an Italian website which incorporates an online agent that refers notaries to prospective clients.

Findings

Decisions to purchase professional services brokered by online agents depend upon trust in the agent, and users’ perceptions of the agent’s ability to reduce information asymmetry, as well as its perceived usefulness. Online agents for professional services can be effective as well as efficient: users who bought the service from an agent-referred notary had higher levels of satisfaction with their professional service provider than users who purchased the service from a different notary.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical effort to investigate the effects of online agents in the specific context of professional service purchasing. The uniqueness of the research context permitted identification of a new type of online agent, the “double-sided online referral agent”.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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