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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Daniel F. Twomey, Rosemarie Feuerbach Twomey and Hesan Quazi

This exploratory research examines environmental, institutional, and behavioral factors that affect interorganizational knowledge development and transfer between United…

Abstract

This exploratory research examines environmental, institutional, and behavioral factors that affect interorganizational knowledge development and transfer between United Kingdom business schools and business. Three theoretical bases—transaction cost economics, extension of transaction cost economics, and power properties—are integrated in order to understand and identify the antecedents and dynamics of the interorganizational interface. Results support the hypothesis that interface collaboration and face‐to‐face communications are important mediators of academic‐business outcomes—learning business practices and cooperative research.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Daniel F. Twomey and Rosemarie Feuerbach Twomey

Proposes that by redirection performance appraisal can become apivotal force for translating, articulating and instilling commitment toan organization′s strategy. Presents…

Abstract

Proposes that by redirection performance appraisal can become a pivotal force for translating, articulating and instilling commitment to an organization′s strategy. Presents a framework for assessing the success and failure of performance appraisal systems in achieving their evaluation and development role on several dimensions. Resolves the limitations of conventional systems by transcending the dysfunctional conflict between evaluation and development. The transformational performance appraisal system is consistent with the new ways of managing and with new organizational forms.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Daniel F. Twomey and Drew L. Harris

The resource view of strategy holds internal resources as a source of unique and inimitable competitive advantage. This strategic perspective, applied to Human Resource…

Abstract

The resource view of strategy holds internal resources as a source of unique and inimitable competitive advantage. This strategic perspective, applied to Human Resource Management (HRM), suggests that aligning HRM sub‐systems with a strategy will produce behaviors and outcomes consistent with the strategy. A current popular strategy attempts to foster intrapreneurial behavior among employees by seeking breakthrough performance and product innovation. A survey of corporate executives shows that infusing HRM sub‐systems with entrepreneurial thrusts will produce more intrapreneurial behaviors and greater organization outcomes.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 10 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 1994

Hesan A. Quazi, Arthur L. Dolinsky and Daniel F. Twomey

This study demonstrates the value of employing a TQM perspective in institutions of higher education. Using data collected from a Mid‐Atlantic…

Abstract

This study demonstrates the value of employing a TQM perspective in institutions of higher education. Using data collected from a Mid‐Atlantic university,Importance‐Performance Analysis and Intra‐Organizational Impact Analysis are introduced. An integration of the results of the two analyses identifies those areas within the university where cooperative arrangements are necessary to achieve improved performance and customer satisfaction.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

Daniel F. Twomey

In today's world the words “strategic”, “networking”, and “synergism” are often used in explaining how to be a world‐class competitor in a knowledge‐based society. With…

Abstract

In today's world the words “strategic”, “networking”, and “synergism” are often used in explaining how to be a world‐class competitor in a knowledge‐based society. With the advent of downsizing and right‐sizing, major changes have been made inside organizations. New structures based on integration and cooperation are replacing rigid hierarchies. Similar changes are taking place at the industry level with firms combining at national and international levels to establish new competencies and competitive advantages. Whether it is Toyota's joint ventures with other auto manufacturers and its special relationships with its suppliers and dealers, or the matrix of cooperative efforts of computer firms, the integration of activities and knowledge is everywhere. Well, it is almost everywhere. In large part, institutions of higher education have not established new ways of integrating the process of knowledge creation and distribution with non‐academic institutions. Even those universities that have expanded external programs continue to use the traditional model of the dispenser of knowledge. For example, many universities have expanded overseas. Fairleigh Dickinson University has a beautiful campus in Wroxton, England. A semester at Wroxton is a treat for any student, but the model is largely traditional with English instead of American professors dispensing knowledge to students. Between academia and business there is a lack of interactive learning, what Argyris calls double‐loop learning.

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Daniel F. Twomey

Organization structures are as important to competitiveness as strategy because structures enable both performance and learning. Yet, organization design factors and…

Abstract

Organization structures are as important to competitiveness as strategy because structures enable both performance and learning. Yet, organization design factors and considerations are often overlooked. The matrix structure and similar types of adhocracies have the potential to transform organizational learning and thereby create a continuous acceleration of innovation. Unlike some adhocracies, the matrix structure focuses on performance and learning. Because of deficiencies in organization culture and management skills, the matrix structure has been less than fully effective. This paper seeks to clarify the issues that continue to block organizational competitiveness as they relate to performance and learning in matrix structures.

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Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1987

Abbas Ali and Daniel F. Twomey

This article investigates personal value systems in Iraq, in a sample of managers. The results indicate that the dominant values are those that compose the…

Abstract

This article investigates personal value systems in Iraq, in a sample of managers. The results indicate that the dominant values are those that compose the outward‐directed category: tribalistic, conformist and socio‐centred. In comparison American managers score high on manipulated values and the inner‐directed category is dominant. The results are discussed in relation to changes in Iraqi society and the functions of management.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Drew L. Harris and Daniel F. Twomey

The purposr of this paper is to introduce a new perspective on the organization's role, purpose, and relationships, both within and among organizations, that holds the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposr of this paper is to introduce a new perspective on the organization's role, purpose, and relationships, both within and among organizations, that holds the promise of more ecologically sustainable and economically competitive business practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes critiques of the current corporate perspective of organizations and builds upon Roome's framework for sustainable management to articulate a new model for organizational relationships that engage value‐chain members in an enterprise‐based competitiveness model. The paper offers examples to illustrate the potential of the new model.

Findings

The new model requires a shift in the mind‐set of executives and major shareholders, but that shift holds the theoretical potential to improve long‐term competitiveness and environmental sustainability.

Practical implications

The enterprise perspective model (EPM) holds the promise of improving competitive strength for firms and reducing negative environmental impacts from their operations. Executives who have embraced this model also find renewed energy and sense of purpose in their work.

Originality/value

This paper introduces the EPM and provides a framework for thinking about the assumptions and practices that need to change to move from the corporation perspective model to the EPM. The paper raises important research questions about implementing the EPM.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1998

Daniel F. Twomey and Rosemarie Feuerbach Twomey

This paper reports on a comprehensive study of business schools in the UK. Data were obtained from two mail surveys ‐ one of faculty members and the other of deans from…

Abstract

This paper reports on a comprehensive study of business schools in the UK. Data were obtained from two mail surveys ‐ one of faculty members and the other of deans from all of the UK business schools. Among the factors studied were demographic and institutional characteristics; the time faculty spends on major activities; faculty rewards, competencies and networks; faculty interaction with business; receptivity and support for increased interaction; benefits of increased interaction; characteristics of faculty who do applied research; barriers to applied research; and the role of advisory boards. The results show an internal alignment of activities and rewards for teaching and research, but limited support for applied and collaborative research, and a divergence between the two principal activities ‐ academic research and teaching. Interaction by business school with business appears to be mostly information passing.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Kishore Pasumarty and Daniel Twomey

The linkage of human resource management (HRM) to strategy formulation and strategy implementation is vital to the long‐term success of the firm — its strategic…

Abstract

The linkage of human resource management (HRM) to strategy formulation and strategy implementation is vital to the long‐term success of the firm — its strategic performance. Several means of linking HRM and strategy have been proposed. Theories and models that show the range of choices in different aspects of the performance systems are discussed. A case of a large telecommunications firm attempting to integrate its performance system and strategy is presented. For each element in the performance system the old and the new performance system characteristics are contrasted. While the assessment of performance systems is ongoing, the most striking observation is that the performance appraisal system is the least changed and most problematic element.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 1 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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