Search results

1 – 10 of 621
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Michael Carney, Saul Estrin, Zhixiang Liang and Daniel Shapiro

This study aims to advance an international political economy (IPE) perspective that geo-political events can have long-lasting imprint effects on countries and their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to advance an international political economy (IPE) perspective that geo-political events can have long-lasting imprint effects on countries and their firms. The study also aims to explore the idea that shared political history and geography combine to create specific structural conditions that shape the international competitiveness of all firms in a region. In particular, the authors consider whether the Monroe Doctrine of 1823, which asserted American influence in the Western Hemisphere, contributed to the creation of institutional structures across Latin America (LA) affecting the strategies of all firms to this day. The authors also illustrate the IPE perspective using the example of the contemporary international competitiveness of LA business groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors illustrate the IPE perspective using the example of the contemporary international competitiveness of LA business groups. The exploratory framework of this study leads to a proposition about the export performance of Latin American business group affiliates. The authors use firm-level performance data for 32,000 firms across emerging economies to explore the proposition empirically while controlling for alternative explanations. To do this, the authors draw on the World Bank Economic Surveys.

Findings

The authors derive a proposition that argues the Monroe Doctrine has had a long-run imprint effect on economic policymaking in LA, resulting in a common, persistent and negative impact on the international competitiveness of firms. The authors find strong and consistent evidence that in terms of export performance, all Latin American firms export less and group affiliates do not outperform independent firms, This finding contrasts with the results for all the other emerging market regions around the world.

Research limitations/implications

The main contribution of this study has been to suggest the potential importance of shared regional geopolitical history and geography in explaining firm-level outcomes. However, this study is preliminary and introductory, although the authors seek to control for alternative country-specific explanations of the results. The analysis considers the effects of one particular IPE phenomenon, the Monroe Doctrine, in one particular location: LA. Future work should seek to contrast LA with other geopolitical security and alternative IPE structures. They might also address the time dimension from a historical perspective: is imprinting in LA driven by the length of the Monroe Doctrine arrangements?

Practical implications

The most important managerial learning point concerns the relevance of geography and political economy factors for multinational enterprises strategy formation. There is widespread understanding that context is an important determinant of subsidiaries’ performance, and that strategies need to be constructed to take account of country-specific characteristics, most importantly, in emerging economies and institutional arrangements. This paper proposes that managers also need to take account of IPE structures, including security arrangements, and to consider the resulting regional as well as national context.

Social implications

The analysis suggests that not only the performance of firms, including emblematic firms, but also the socially beneficial spillovers that might be generated from them, are contingent on the regional as well as national characteristics. Thus, business groups in most emerging economies are found to yield better performance and to provide higher levels of social impact, including concerning ESG goals. However, the findings of this study suggest that the former is not true for LA, which, the authors argue, is a consequence of imprinting as a result of the Monroe Doctrine. Further work is needed to establish whether the latter effect is also not true, but if that is the case, then regionally specific policies may be required to address the resulting corporate social shortfalls.

Originality/value

The core idea is that geo-political events can have long-lasting imprint effects on countries and their firms: that shared political history and geography create specific structural conditions that shape the international competitiveness of all firms in a region. The authors explore this concept with reference to the Monroe Doctrine, asking whether its assertion of US influence across the Americas contributed to the creation of institutional structures across LA affecting the strategies of all firms to this day.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Michael Carney, Marc Van Essen, Saul Estrin and Daniel Shapiro

The purpose of this paper is to examine two prominent perspectives on business group functioning, institutional void (IV) and entrenchment/exploitation (EE), that make…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine two prominent perspectives on business group functioning, institutional void (IV) and entrenchment/exploitation (EE), that make different predictions about the effect of business group (BG) on the economy. The authors examine the effects of BG prevalence in an economy and its effect on macroeconomic outcomes including foreign direct inward and outward investment, innovation and development of the financial sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors build a unique database by extracting estimates of BG prevalence for multiple countries between 1978 and 2012 from the existing literature and use this to test conflicting predictions derived from the IV and EE perspectives, respectively.

Findings

The authors find no consistent evidence that BG prevalence diminishes over time with economic development as IVs diminish, which is predicted by the IV perspective. Instead, the long-term persistence of BGs in many countries appears to be more consistent with the EE perspective. However, this study also finds no support for the perspective that high levels of BG prevalence are negatively associated with country-level indicators and determinants of economic development and competitiveness, as suggested by that perspective.

Originality/value

The authors conclude that there is no robust support for either the IV or the EE perspective and highlight the need for more contextualized theorizing about the evolution of BGs.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2016

Jean Boddewyn

This chapter complements the one that appeared as “History of the AIB Fellows: 1975–2008” in Volume 14 of this series (International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on…

Abstract

This chapter complements the one that appeared as “History of the AIB Fellows: 1975–2008” in Volume 14 of this series (International Business Scholarship: AIB Fellows on the First 50 Years and Beyond, Jean J. Boddewyn, Editor). It traces what happened under the deanship of Alan Rugman (2011–2014) who took many initiatives reported here while his death in July 2014 generated trenchant, funny, and loving comments from more than half of the AIB Fellows. The lives and contributions of many other major international business scholars who passed away from 2008 to 2014 are also evoked here: Endel Kolde, Lee Nehrt, Howard Perlmutter, Stefan Robock, John Ryans, Vern Terpstra, and Daniel Van Den Bulcke.

Details

Perspectives on Headquarters-subsidiary Relationships in the Contemporary MNC
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-370-2

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2019

Daniel Shapiro and Chang Hoon Oh

Downloads
254

Abstract

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Daniel Shapiro and Chang Hoon Oh

Downloads
234

Abstract

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Adetoun A. Oyelude

This edition looks at trending snippets mainly from library conferences around the world in the past few months.

Downloads
214

Abstract

Purpose

This edition looks at trending snippets mainly from library conferences around the world in the past few months.

Design/methodology/approach

The conferences and the themes reflect the thoughts and focus of library and information professionals worldwide as seen in internet reports from wikis and blogs.

Findings

Thus far, data and data management is the most focused topic of 2017.

Social implications

Daniel Shapiro in his report on the LITA blog described his experience at the two-day workshop organized by the Library of Congress, George Washington University and George Mason University.

Originality/value

The workshop titled “Collections as data: hack-to-learn” had four datasets and five tools to work with. Over the two-day period, participants worked with data tools such as OpenRefine, Voyant, MALLET, Gephi and Carto. Working with the data and data analysis tools for Shapiro yielded results, but the usual process in research of formulating hypothesis is still crucial even with all the deluge of data.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Daniel M. Shapiro, Eric Gedajlovic and Carolyn Erdener

Much of the extant literature on the Chinese Family Firm highlights the unique cultural heritage and social context in which they are embedded as primary determinants of…

Abstract

Much of the extant literature on the Chinese Family Firm highlights the unique cultural heritage and social context in which they are embedded as primary determinants of their strategic behavior. In contrast, few studies have examined the strategic behavior of Chinese Family Firms from an economic perspective. In this paper, we address this gap in the literature by applying Dunning's eclectic theory of the MNE to the Chinese Family Firm. In doing so, we generate a series of testable propositions. We suggest that although the strategic behavior of Chinese Family Firms will differ significantly from those of classic Western MNEs, they are nonetheless amenable to interpretation according to Dunning's analytical constructs of ownership (O), internalization (I) and locational (L) advantages. More specifically, we find that like the classic Western MNE, the Chinese Family Firm can be understood as a viable mechanism for capitalizing on particular configurations of OLI advantages in international markets.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 16 February 2006

Steven Globerman, Daniel Shapiro and Yao Tang

Many of the emerging and transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have been building their economies largely on the infrastructure inherited from Communist…

Abstract

Many of the emerging and transition economies in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have been building their economies largely on the infrastructure inherited from Communist times. It is widely recognized that much of the infrastructure in both the private and public sectors must be replaced if those economies are to achieve acceptable rates of economic growth and participate successfully within the broader European Union (EU) economic zone (The Economist, 2003). Upgrading infrastructure includes the likely importation of technology and management expertise, as well as substantial financial commitments. In this regard, inward foreign direct investment (FDI) is a particularly important potential source of capital for the emerging and transition European economies (ETEEs). FDI usually entails the importation of financial and human capital by the host economy with measurable and positive spillover impacts on host countries’ productivity levels (Holland & Pain, 1998a). The ability of ETEEs to attract and benefit from inward FDI should therefore be seen as an important issue within the broader policy context of how these countries can improve and expand their capital infrastructure, given relatively undeveloped domestic capital markets and scarce human capital.

Details

Emerging European Financial Markets: Independence and Integration Post-Enlargement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-264-1

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

Richard Pomfret and Daniel Shapiro

The relationships among firm size, profitability and diversification are examined for a sample from the top 400 industrial firms in Canada in 1975. Account is taken of…

Abstract

The relationships among firm size, profitability and diversification are examined for a sample from the top 400 industrial firms in Canada in 1975. Account is taken of industry‐specific factors and of foreign ownership. The main findings are that increasing firm size is not associated with higher profitability, larger firms do appear to experience greater prof it stability, and the relationship between firm size and diversification is positive but weak. Industry factors are far more important than firm size in determining inter‐firm variations in diversification, implying that diversification is not undertaken as a means to stabilise profits by all large firms.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Victor Zitian Chen, Jing Li and Daniel M. Shapiro

The purpose of this study is to extend the classic country-specific advantage (CSA) – firm-specific advantage (FSA) framework by integrating an institution-based view of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to extend the classic country-specific advantage (CSA) – firm-specific advantage (FSA) framework by integrating an institution-based view of CSAs into the discussion of FSAs. In his classic CSA – FSA framework, Rugman suggests that successful multi-national enterprises (MNEs) are often built on the interaction between strong FSAs and strong CSAs at home. In the case of emerging market multi-nationals (EMNEs), he argued that strong CSAs were of particular importance in allowing EMNEs to develop FSAs. In particular, we examine CSAs at the sub-national level.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors suggest that sub-national heterogeneity in market-supporting institutions is an important feature of emerging market economies, and that consideration of such heterogeneity contributes to our understanding of firm capabilities and overseas investment behavior of emerging market firms. The authors also identify explicitly the mechanisms through which sub-national institutions at home affect FSAs and, subsequently, the ability of emerging market firms’ entry into developed markets. Specifically, the authors argue that strong local institutions that support effective and well-functioning markets create the conditions that induce firms in that location to develop market-related capabilities in R & D and marketing, which, in turn, enable them to expand into developed countries.

Findings

Using a unique data set on overseas investment by Chinese firms and causal mediation analysis, the authors find strong evidence in support of the view that strong sub-national institutions help emerging market firms develop the capabilities to enter developed country markets.

Originality/value

This study extends the classic CSA–FSA framework by integrating an institution-based view of CSAs into the discussion of FSAs. In particular, the authors examine CSAs at the sub-national level.

Details

The Multinational Business Review, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 621