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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Johan Hagberg and Daniel Normark

– This study aims to follow the gradual transformation of consumer mobility in mid-20th-century Sweden in connection with the introduction of self-service retailing.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to follow the gradual transformation of consumer mobility in mid-20th-century Sweden in connection with the introduction of self-service retailing.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an analysis of the magazine ICA-Tidningen, published by the major Swedish retailer ICA, for the period from 1941 to 1970.

Findings

The paper describes the transformation of consumer mobility as a set of interrelated changes that involved both retailers and consumers, the interrelationship between modes of transport and container technologies and how self-service not only transformed the interior of retail stores but also had more far-reaching implications.

Originality/value

When attempting to understand the reconfiguration of shopping practices in the 20th century, there is a tendency to focus on large infrastructural changes. These studies tend to overlook gradual, mundane and everyday translations. This paper contributes methodological tools and analyses that account for such mundane transformations.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2015

Mats Urde and Stephen A Greyser

– The purpose of this study is to understand the identity of the Nobel Prize as a corporate heritage brand and its management challenges.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the identity of the Nobel Prize as a corporate heritage brand and its management challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

An in-depth case study analysed within a heritage brand model and a corporate brand identity framework.

Findings

The Nobel Prize is a corporate heritage brand – one whose value proposition is based on heritage – in this case “achievements for the benefit of mankind” (derived directly from Alfred Nobel’s will). It is also defined as a “networked brand”, one where four independent collaborating organisations around the (Nobel) hub create and sustain the Nobel Prize’s identity and reputation, acting as a “federated republic”.

Research limitations/implications

The new and combined application of the Heritage Quotient framework and the Corporate Brand Identity Matrix in the Heritage Brand Identity Process (HBIP) offers a structured approach to integrate the identity of a corporate heritage brand. In a networked situation, understanding the role of stewardship in collaborating organisations is essential: The network entities maintain their own identities and goals, but share common values of the network hub.

Practical implications

The integrated frameworks (HBIP) provides a platform for managing a corporate heritage brand.

Originality/value

This is the first field-based study of the Nobel Prize from a strategic brand management perspective.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2019

Jim Andersén and Annelie Andersén

Although most studies on HPWS focus on various firm-level outcomes, there has been an increasing interest in how employees are affected by HPWS. However, most of these…

Abstract

Purpose

Although most studies on HPWS focus on various firm-level outcomes, there has been an increasing interest in how employees are affected by HPWS. However, most of these studies use social exchange theory and, based on an idea of reciprocal exchange, implicitly assume that all employees become more affectively committed to organizations using HPWS. Based on social identity theory, the authors argue that management position and gender likely influence how individuals respond to HPWS. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to examine how HPWS affects AC among managers, subordinates, men and women.

Design/methodology/approach

Hierarchical linear model analysis of 356 employees in 26 Swedish small- and medium-sized manufacturing companies.

Findings

In the sample examined, managers and women show increased affective commitment (AC) in organizations using HPWS. For men with non-managerial positions, the results indicate a reversed relationship, i.e. HPWS could actually reduce AC.

Originality/value

The findings indicate the need to consider individual differences when examining the effect of HPWS, and highlight the usefulness of relational-oriented theories when studying the employee outcomes of HRM-systems.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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