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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Daniel Nilsson

The aim of this paper is to investigate cross‐cultural variations in the demographics of consumers using self‐service technologies (SSTs).

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate cross‐cultural variations in the demographics of consumers using self‐service technologies (SSTs).

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were randomly distributed to individuals in Sweden and Estonia to analyze their SST usage and demographic characteristics. Sweden and Estonia were chosen because of their cultural differences – Sweden represents an established Western European market, whereas Estonia, a former Soviet republic, is considered an emerging market.

Findings

Data analysis revealed that the demographics of Swedish and Estonian SST users are quite different. Swedish users are demographically heterogeneous, whereas Estonian users can be segmented according to age, gender, education, and income.

Research limitations/implications

A larger study conducted in several cultures would add to our knowledge of a culture's influence on an individual's SST usage.

Practical implications

As this study shows, business models used in Western markets may not be applicable to emerging markets because of cultural differences. Therefore, it is important that Western firms intending to expand into emerging markets must become aware of cultural differences.

Originality/value

Because the world economy is becoming increasingly cross‐cultural, it is imperative to conduct international consumer research to further the understanding of SST usage from a global perspective. This paper provides a thorough examination of which, if any, demographical segments of consumers use SSTs and if the demographics of users vary amongst different cultures.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Kent Eriksson, Katri Kerem and Daniel Nilsson

The purpose of this paper is to study technology acceptance of internet banking in Estonia, an emerging east European economy.

12025

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study technology acceptance of internet banking in Estonia, an emerging east European economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The present paper modifies the technology acceptance model and applies it to bank customers in Estonia, because Estonia, a country with a developing economy, has focused on internet banking as an important distribution channel.

Findings

The findings suggest that internet bank use increases insofar as customers perceive it as useful. The perceived usefulness is central because it determines whether the perceived ease of internet bank use will lead to increased use of the internet bank. Put differently, a well‐designed and easy to use internet bank may not be used if it is not perceived as useful. We thus conclude that the perceived usefulness of internet banking is, for banks, a key construct for promoting customer use. We also suggest that models of technology acceptance should be re‐formulated to focus more on the key role of the perceived usefulness of the service embedded in the technology.

Research limitations/implications

Implications for banks are that they need to put much effort not only into making a user‐friendly internet bank, but also into explaining to their customers how the internet bank is useful to them.

Originality/value

Contributes to the literature on internet banking in an East European economy.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Kent Eriksson, Katri Kerem and Daniel Nilsson

This study aims to examine innovation adoption in the context of internet banking in Estonia.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine innovation adoption in the context of internet banking in Estonia.

Design/methodology/approach

The data presented in this study are based on 1,831 questionnaires collected from individual internet banking users in Estonia.

Findings

This study extends the applicability of the innovation adoption model developed by Everett Rogers to Estonian internet banking. The model starts with the independent variables: relative advantage; complexity; perceived risk; and compatibility, and the analysis shows that relative advantage and complexity have the strongest influence on adoption of internet banking.

Practical implications

The managerial implications of this paper include its contributions toward better understanding of the commercial viability in CEE economies of businesses based on Western‐style technology.

Originality/value

This study suggests modifications to Rogers' original model in order to apply it to the fast‐growing new CEE economies, thus reaffirming the importance of his model.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

307

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Daniel Ellström and Martin Hoshi Larsson

The purpose of this paper is to understand differences between open-book accounting (OBA) using static prices and OBA using dynamic prices. The authors identify how these…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand differences between open-book accounting (OBA) using static prices and OBA using dynamic prices. The authors identify how these differences influence various aspects of customer–supplier relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a case study involving a builders’ merchant and a wood manufacturer in the UK. The builders’ merchant under discussion has recently outsourced part of its production to the aforementioned wood manufacturer by using OBA with dynamic prices. For this case study, the authors have conducted interviews with multiple people from both parties in the agreement. Additional illustrative cases are provided through a study of other qualitative papers on OBA.

Findings

The authors find evidence supporting that, when dynamic prices are used in OBA, risk (unpredictability) is shifted from the supplier to the customer. Also, the customer frequently focuses on the supplier’s costs, both parties often aim for a long-term relationship and the customer becomes more dependent on the supplier, causing high interdependence. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that the customer finds price less important, and the reallocation of activities between the customer and supplier is easier in OBA setups in which dynamic prices are used.

Originality/value

This paper provides the first study of how differences between dynamic and static prices in OBA influence the customer–supplier relationship. This paper adds to the developing literature on OBA, in particular, as well as to literature on pricing, in general.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Anders Pehrsson

Drawing on the contingency perspective of strategy, the purpose of this paper is to extend current understanding of fit between a differentiation strategy of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the contingency perspective of strategy, the purpose of this paper is to extend current understanding of fit between a differentiation strategy of the industrial firm’s foreign subsidiary and key contextual boundaries.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is developed in which a differentiation strategy involves the complementary approaches of innovativeness and customer responsiveness. The key boundaries consist of local competitive dynamics and the value-adding mandate assigned to the subsidiary. Detailed features of four types of differentiation strategies are identified by analysing strategies applied by subsidiaries of industrial firms operating on the US market.

Findings

Four propositions are developed regarding alignment between strategy types and the boundaries. Relationships are proposed regarding a strategy type and a context specified by rivalry/relational competitive dynamics, and a broad/narrow value-adding mandate.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptual framework and the propositions may be tested by analysing statistical data on industrial firms’ subsidiaries operating in several host countries.

Practical implications

To increase a foreign subsidiary’s contribution to the global competitiveness of an industrial firm, an awareness of the boundaries to the subsidiary’s strategy of differentiation that may hamper the subsidiary’s performance is essential.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework, and the propositions, contributes to literature on the industrial firm’s global strategy because it focuses on subsidiary strategy and extends present understanding of the mechanisms that drive the effectiveness of a foreign subsidiary’s differentiation strategy.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Anders Pehrsson and Tobias Pehrsson

The purpose is to extend the understanding of the resource base of the industrial firm's greenfield expansion on a foreign country market once a wholly owned subsidiary…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to extend the understanding of the resource base of the industrial firm's greenfield expansion on a foreign country market once a wholly owned subsidiary has been established.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is developed relying on the resource-based theory of strategy. Resource bases in terms of value-adding activities of four Swedish industrial firms' subsidiaries in the USA are analysed. Four theoretical propositions are formulated regarding consistent associations among the activities and contingencies that are relevant to expansion on a foreign country market.

Findings

The propositions show how foreign subsidiaries' value-adding activities are aligned with two contingencies: the corporate strategy manifested by the product/market knowledge transferred from the parent firm that enable local expansion and the subsidiary's knowledge of competition barriers that obstruct local expansion. The value-adding activity may be basic or advanced and may repeat the parent firm's activity.

Research limitations/implications

US subsidiaries of four Swedish industrial firms were analysed. The propositions may be turned into hypotheses suitable for tests in statistical studies. A test may include firms from different home countries and subsidiaries on different host country markets.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework and the propositions provide a ground for an industrial firm's decision to conduct a strategy of greenfield expansion on a foreign country market once a wholly owned subsidiary has been established.

Originality/value

The framework is unique and emphasizes that both knowledge stemming from corporate strategy and knowledge of local competition need to be acknowledged in order to understand firm's greenfield expansion on a foreign country market.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Jhon Wilder Zartha Sossa, William Halal and Raul Hernandez Zarta

The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the Delphi method, its characteristics and current applications through an analysis of recent most-cited…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the Delphi method, its characteristics and current applications through an analysis of recent most-cited scientific papers, with an emphasis on three axes, namely, the number of rounds used, stakeholder participation relevance or only academic experts’ participation and the possibility of using indicators or techniques different from those related to descriptive statistics.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 57 papers were initially reviewed, 10 of them with a high citation rate. Then, an analysis was made of papers in Scopus for the period 2015-2018 published in the Technological Forecasting and Social Change Journal and in the Futures and Foresight Journal, which had the characteristic of displaying quartile Q1 or Q2 in Scimago in addition to being in Scopus.

Findings

Among the main results, the authors observe the tendency to use fewer rounds, a higher prevalence of stakeholder participation and not only academic experts but also the use of new types of modified Delphi such as real-time spatial Delphi, Delphi group, market Delphi, real-world Delphi and policy Delphi.

Originality/value

Among the conclusions, the possibility of using other indicators or complementary techniques to the descriptive statistics is highlighted such as number of justifications or comments between rounds, coefficients to quantify the competence or degree of expertise of the participants, measures of the perception of the expert on the usefulness of the presented feedback, graphs of the number of arguments according to the number of questions, the Wilcoxon Ranked Pairs Test, the k means, Kolmogorov–Simonov test and the Mann–Whitney U-test.

Details

foresight, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Daniel Hellström and Fredrik Nilsson

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the strategic potential of logistics‐driven packaging innovation in retail supply chains, and suggest propositions…

18722

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe the strategic potential of logistics‐driven packaging innovation in retail supply chains, and suggest propositions for further research and development, providing practitioners with a better basis on which to make strategic packaging and logistics decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth case study was conducted at a large global retailer which had implemented an innovative unit load carrier. The case study highlights a previously inaccessible phenomenon, as this type of unit load carrier has only been implemented on a large‐scale in the studied retailer's supply chain. In order to explore the impact of the innovative unit load carrier, the case study draws on a longitudinal research approach.

Findings

The case study demonstrates the potential of logistics‐driven packaging innovation in retail supply chains. It provides detailed insights into the impact of an innovative unit load carrier on different supply chain echelons. These insights emphasise the need for a systems perspective in order to understand the total impact of packaging innovations on supply chains.

Research limitations/implications

The case study focuses on the impact of a particular innovation on a particular supply chain. Even though the consequences in other supply chains may be different, this study provides detailed explanations and illustrative examples which generate insights relevant to other firms and supply chains.

Practical implications

This paper provides an understanding of potential trade‐offs between standardised and differentiated packaging, providing practitioners with a better basis for making decisions on packaging design and development.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the need to consider packaging as a strategic component which contributes to overall supply chain performance. To support strategic packaging decision‐making propositions for packaging innovation in retail supply chains are provided.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2009

Torbjörn Åkerstedt, Peter M. Nilsson and Göran Kecklund

This chapter summarizes the knowledge on sleep and restitution. Sleep constitutes the recuperative process of the central nervous system. The use of the brain during…

Abstract

This chapter summarizes the knowledge on sleep and restitution. Sleep constitutes the recuperative process of the central nervous system. The use of the brain during wakefulness will lead to depletion of energy in the cortical areas locally responsible for activity. The level of depletion is monitored and sleep is initiated when critical levels are reached. The attempts to initiate sleep are perceived as sleepiness or fatigue. The ensuing sleep then actively restores brain physiology to normal levels. This also results in restored alertness, memory capacity, and mood. Also, peripheral anabolic processes (secretion of growth hormone and testosterone) are strongly enhanced and catabolic process (secretion of cortisol and catecholamines) are strongly suppressed. In the long run, reduced or impaired sleep leads to metabolic diseases, depression, burnout, and mortality. Stress and irregular hours are among the main causes of disturbed sleep.

Details

Current Perspectives on Job-Stress Recovery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-544-0

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