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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Daniel Kuehn

In 1969, Warren Nutter left the University of Virginia Department of Economics to serve as the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in the…

Abstract

In 1969, Warren Nutter left the University of Virginia Department of Economics to serve as the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in the Nixon administration. During his time in the Defense Department, Nutter was deeply involved in laying the groundwork for a military coup against the democratically elected president of Chile, Salvador Allende. Although Nutter left the Pentagon several months before the successful 1973 coup, his role in Chile was far more direct than the better-known cases of Friedrich Hayek, Milton Friedman, James Buchanan, and Arnold Harberger. This chapter describes Nutter’s role in Chile policymaking in the Nixon administration. It shows how Nutter’s criticisms of Henry Kissinger are grounded in his economics, and compares and contrasts Nutter with other economists who have been connected to Pinochet’s dictatorship.

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Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Selection of Papers Presented at the 2019 ALAHPE Conference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-140-2

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2021

Abstract

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology: Including a Selection of Papers Presented at the 2019 ALAHPE Conference
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-140-2

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Andreas Kuehn

This article compares the use of deep packet inspection (DPI) technology to the use of cookies for online behavioral advertising (OBA), in the form of two competing

Abstract

Purpose

This article compares the use of deep packet inspection (DPI) technology to the use of cookies for online behavioral advertising (OBA), in the form of two competing paradigms. It seeks to explain why DPI was eliminated as a viable option due to political and regulatory reactions whereas cookies technology was not, even though it raises some of the same privacy issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paradigms draw from two-sided market theory to conceptualize OBA. Empirical case studies, NebuAd's DPI platform and Facebook's Beacon program, substantiate the paradigms with insights into the controversies on behavioral tracking between 2006 and 2009 in the USA. The case studies are based on document analyses and interviews.

Findings

Comparing the two cases from a technological, economic, and institutional perspective, the article argues that both paradigms were equally privacy intrusive. Thus, it rejects the generally held view that privacy issues can explain the outcome of the battle. Politics and regulatory legacy tilted the playing field towards the cookies paradigm, impeding a competing technology.

Originality/value

Shifting the narrative away from privacy to competing tracking paradigms and their specific actors sheds light on the political and the regulatory rationales that were not considered in previous research on OBA. Particularly, setting forth institutional aspects on OBA – and DPI in general – the case studies provide much needed empirical analysis to reassess tracking technologies and policy outcomes.

Details

info, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Amanda Buday

The focus on local-level policy initiatives in US anti-fracking movements presents unique opportunities to explore interactions between professional advocacy organizations…

Abstract

The focus on local-level policy initiatives in US anti-fracking movements presents unique opportunities to explore interactions between professional advocacy organizations with regional/national constituencies and grassroots organizations with constituencies who will directly experience changes in local landscapes resulting from unconventional oil and gas development (UOGD). However, research on anti-fracking movements in the US has considered dynamics of interorganizational cooperation only peripherally. This chapter examines factors that motivate coalition building, sources of coalition fragmentation, and the progressive polarization of grassroots anti-fracking and countermovement activists using qualitative research on an anti-fracking movement in Illinois. While grassroots groups may experience some strategic advantages by collaborating with extra-local, professionalized advocacy organizations, these relationships involve navigating considerable inequalities. In the case presented here, I find that coalition building was important for putting UOGD on the policy agenda. However, when anti-fracking activists began experiencing success, institutionalization rapidly produced fragmentation in the coalition, and a countermovement of UOGD supporters was formed. I highlight how ordinary movement dynamics are particularly susceptible to polarization in the context of local land use disputes that “scale-up” to involve broader movement constituencies as perceptions of distributive injustice collide with perceptions of procedural injustice.

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Antje Cockrill, Mark Goode and Daniel Emberson

The concept of servicescape and its effect on consumer behaviour has been studied extensively in numerous areas of retailing. However, the role of servicescape in…

Abstract

Purpose

The concept of servicescape and its effect on consumer behaviour has been studied extensively in numerous areas of retailing. However, the role of servicescape in non‐traditional service settings has received comparatively little attention. The aim of this paper is to fill in some of this research gap by testing the effects of servicescape (ambience, layout and functionality) on consumer behaviour within UK betting shops, as part of the wider UK gambling industry.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to achieve this objective an exploratory research methodology was chosen. Firstly, three betting shops in the same metropolitan area were chosen as the base for interviews with managers and structured observations. This was complemented by fifty semi‐structured customer interviews from the same three betting shops. The use of these different methods allowed triangulation and validation of the results.

Findings

The key finding of this paper are that customers in betting shops appear to be unaffected by some of the elements of the servicescape. However, this research has found that signs, symbols and artefacts were regarded as critically important by consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Further, larger scale research is needed on the effects of servicescape in environments where consumption behaviour could be considered compulsive. This could includes, e.g. betting shops, arcades, casinos, bingo halls and National Lottery “shops.” Furthermore, this paper could also be used as the basis for further research on the e‐servicescape of the online gambling industry.

Practical implications

Some servicescape elements do not appear to affect betting shop customers greatly, but staff knowledge is important. Therefore, resources should be spent on improving staff knowledge rather than on other elements of the servicescape.

Originality/value

No prior empirical research has been found in this area.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Abstract

Details

Strategic Management in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-166-5

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Krassimir Todorov and Yusaf H. Akbar

Abstract

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Strategic Management in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-166-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Juhaida Abu Bakar, Michael Daniel Clemes and Kathryn Bicknell

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a comprehensive hierarchical model of behavioural intentions in the Malaysian retail banking industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a comprehensive hierarchical model of behavioural intentions in the Malaysian retail banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were analysed using EFA, CFA and structural modelling.

Findings

The findings illustrate that customer satisfaction is the most important determinant of behavioural intentions, followed by switching costs, corporate image and perceived value. Service quality is indirectly related to behavioural intentions and customer satisfaction mediates the relationship between the two constructs. Customer satisfaction is strongly influenced by service quality, corporate image and perceived value. Service quality is also an antecedent of perceived value, corporate image and switching costs. The empirical results also support a hierarchical and multidimensional approach for conceptualising and measuring customers’ perceptions of service quality.

Research limitations/implications

The comprehensive hierarchical model developed in this research can be used as framework for additional studies on the banking industry.

Practical implications

The findings provide Malaysian bank managers with empirically-based insights into behavioural intentions and offer guidelines for assessing and improving service quality.

Originality/value

This is the first study that uses comprehensive hierarchical modelling to synthesise the effects of service quality, customer satisfaction, perceived value, corporate image and switching costs on the behavioural intentions of retail bank customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Abstract

Details

Strategic Management in Emerging Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-166-5

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Carmen Guzmán‐Alfonso and Joaquín Guzmán‐Cuevas

The aim of this research is to determine whether entrepreneurial intention models explain the entrepreneurial behaviour of individuals regarding venture creation in Latin…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to determine whether entrepreneurial intention models explain the entrepreneurial behaviour of individuals regarding venture creation in Latin America, as well as to test if the three factors usually taken into consideration in these models (attitudes, perceived social value, and perceived self‐efficacy, as defined by Ajzen) really determine entrepreneurial intentions in this part of the world.

Design/methodology/approach

By using panel data from Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Global Report for the years 2008, 2009 and 2010, referring to Latin America, the paper employs two linear regression models to examine determinants of entrepreneurial intentions in Latin America and the role of the entrepreneurial intentions in the entrepreneurial initiative.

Findings

According to the results obtained, it can be stated that, also for the case of Latin America, entrepreneurial intentions are once more confirmed as a previous step of entrepreneurial behaviour with regard to venture creation. However, even though the three variables taken into consideration are significant as determinants of entrepreneurial intentions, evidence suggests a negative relationship between the perception of social value about entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial intention, which contradicts the previous literature review. A further investigation regarding this result is planned for the near future.

Originality/value

The originality of this research arises from bringing together in a model three of the main elements in the research field of entrepreneurship – entrepreneurial intention models, global entrepreneurship monitor and Latin America (one of the most important places where the entrepreneurship phenomenon takes place).

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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