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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Daniel J. Svyantek

This issue is a continuation of the International Journal of Organizational Analysis's special issue on emotional intelligence published in the last issue of the 2002…

Abstract

This issue is a continuation of the International Journal of Organizational Analysis's special issue on emotional intelligence published in the last issue of the 2002 volume. The introduction to that issue noted that research investigating the relationship between intelligence and behavior in organizations had traditionally focused on the general intelligence construct, g, but that a growing number of researchers were focusing on other aspects of intelligence (Svyantek & Rahim, 2002). Theorists such as Gardner (1983; 1999) and Sternberg (2002) have provided conceptualizations of intelligence as an adaptive mechanism for individuals residing within organizations based on specific intelligences, not g. One of these specific intelligences is emotional intelligence (EI) (Goleman, 1995; 1998).

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Linda L. Brown and Daniel J. Svyantek

Analyses of organizational behavior traditionally use methods based on linear statistics. However, aspects of complex system behavior, such as market share performance…

Abstract

Analyses of organizational behavior traditionally use methods based on linear statistics. However, aspects of complex system behavior, such as market share performance, may be better modeled and understood using graphical approaches. These approaches can be used to clarify the relationships between variables found in psychological research and can provide a complement to traditional research representations that has particular value for the practitioner in organizations. This paper demonstrates how three‐dimensional graphs can be valuable tools for understanding, explaining, and communicating research results by using longitudinal performance data from the automotive industry as an illustration.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Judith L. Juodvalkis, Beth A. Grefe, Mary Hogue, Daniel J. Svyantek and William DeLamarter

This paper investigated the interactions between gender stereotypes for jobs, applicant gender, and the communication styles used by male and female applicants during an…

Abstract

This paper investigated the interactions between gender stereotypes for jobs, applicant gender, and the communication styles used by male and female applicants during an interview. This study was conducted as a laboratory experiment, utilizing a 2x2x2 mixed design. Subjects read one job description and heard three audiotapes of all male or all female job applicants exhibiting a dominant, submissive, or neutral communication style. The subjects then rated the applicant on five dimensions. These dimensions are likeability, competence, sociability, overall impression, and hireability. Results showed significant interactions of applicant gender and communication style on four of the five dimensions rated in this study. An inspection of the dimension means revealed different effects for gender‐appropriate and gender‐inappropriate behavior for males and females. Males were penalized on ratings of overall impression and hireability for communicating in stereotypically gender‐inappropriate manners. Females were penalized on ratings of sociability and likeability for communicating in a stereotypically gender‐inappropriate fashion. The implications of these findings for using interviews are then discussed in terms of aversive genderism.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Daniel J. Svyantek, Kevin T. Mahoney and Linda L. Brown

This paper takes the stance that there are two criteria for evaluation of diversity in organizations. These criteria are (a) competition with other organizations and (b…

Abstract

This paper takes the stance that there are two criteria for evaluation of diversity in organizations. These criteria are (a) competition with other organizations and (b) the maintenance of the organization across time. Organizations which seek diversity without considering its effects on competitive and maintenance goals place themselves at a disadvantage vis‐a‐vis their competitors. Two case examples, the Persian and Roman Empires, are used to show how different diversity management practices affect organizations. Differences between the two empires are related to the degree to which they allowed for inclusion of diverse cultural groups. The Persian Empire was exclusionary. The Roman Empire was inclusionary. Roman inclusionary practices were based on merit. Inclusion by merit is shown to lead to increased organizational effectiveness primarily in terms of increased organizational resiliency across time.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Sarah B. Lueke and Daniel J. Svyantek

The socialization process of expatriates into their host country organizational culture has been largely ignored in the expatriate literature. This paper reviews the…

Abstract

The socialization process of expatriates into their host country organizational culture has been largely ignored in the expatriate literature. This paper reviews the expatriate literature for the best employee and organizational results. For the most part, socialization tactics of the organization and information seeking of the individual have been overlooked as factors in the success of expatriates. We propose that combining knowledge gained through research in these two areas is essential in gaining a theoretical understanding of expatriate turnover. The Attraction‐Selection‐Attrition (ASA) model of how organizational culture is transmitted across organizational members is discussed. This model is used to demonstrate how the socialization of expatriates can benefit both the organization and the individual.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Daniel J. Svyantek

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis (IJOA) would not exist without the hard work and dedication of its founder and editor for twelve years, Dr. M. Afzalur…

Abstract

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis (IJOA) would not exist without the hard work and dedication of its founder and editor for twelve years, Dr. M. Afzalur Rahim. The journal is the result of the hard work and dedication of Dr. Rahim. Dr. Rahim is responsible for its development and growth as an outlet for quality articles in a wide range of areas including organizational theory, strategic management, organizational behavior, and human resource management. Dr. Rahim has worked very hard to make the title of this journal be reflected in the articles published in IJOA. Thanks to Dr. Rahim's hard work, many articles in IJOA are published by authors outside of the USA and deal with international samples.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Daniel J. Svyantek and Steven E. Ekeberg

Organizational decision‐makers require information presented in ways that allow them to make informed decisions on the effectiveness of change interventions. Current…

Abstract

Organizational decision‐makers require information presented in ways that allow them to make informed decisions on the effectiveness of change interventions. Current statistical methods do not provide enough information about the practical value of organizational interventions to decision‐makers. It is proposed that a strong hypothesis testing strategy provides a partial answer to this problem. The hypothesis testing method presented here uses Bayesian statistics to test null hypotheses other than the traditional Ho = 0. A description of the evaluation of a change project in six manufacturing plants of a large United States corporation is provided. The data from this project is used to show how both statistical and practical significance may be tested using this hypothesis testing method. The applicability of the strong hypothesis testing approach to the assessment of organizational change is then discussed, and recommendations are made for evaluations conducted in field settings.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Jennifer P. Bott, Daniel J. Svyantek, Scott A. Goodman and David S. Bernal

This study examines the role of personality and work experience in predicting two measures of job performance: Proficiency on the job tasks assigned to employees (task…

Abstract

This study examines the role of personality and work experience in predicting two measures of job performance: Proficiency on the job tasks assigned to employees (task performance) and discretionary behaviors (e.g., helping) that may or may not be performed by employees (contextual performance). The two types of performance measures were shown to have different patterns of association with work experience and personality dimensions, such that personality was more predictive of contextual performance, while job experience was more predictive of task‐based performance. Noticeably, conscientiousness did not predict task‐based performance. Implications and limitations of the present study, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

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The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Michael G. Bowen, Ronald Burke, Gary J. Castrogiovanni, James H. Dulebohn, Mingfang Li and Daniel J. Svyantek

This issue marks a clear transition issue for this journal: This transition will, we hope, provide new directions which aid the development of the journal into a more…

Abstract

This issue marks a clear transition issue for this journal: This transition will, we hope, provide new directions which aid the development of the journal into a more recognized and used journal. These changes include a name change; a new group of editors; the re‐establishment of the journal's time‐line for publication; changes in the editorial board; and some information on new directions in the journal. We would like to describe some of these developments and provide you with information on the new directions for the journal in this year and upcoming years.

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Organizational Analysis, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1551-7470

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Daniel J. Svyantek

The Roman Empire illustrates how change occurs in complex social systems. An analysis of: the effects of transformational leadership and transactional leadership styles in…

Abstract

The Roman Empire illustrates how change occurs in complex social systems. An analysis of: the effects of transformational leadership and transactional leadership styles in complex social systems; and the relationship between leadership style and the social context is conducted. Julius Caesar is shown to have failed to create a new method of governing Rome. Augustus Caesar, however, created the basis for the Roman Empire. Their careers show that change which is incremental and does not violate the core culture of a system is more likely to transform a social system than more radical, transformational methods.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 5 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-252X

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