Search results

1 – 10 of 33
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Fee Hilbert, Julia Barth, Julia Gremm, Daniel Gros, Jessica Haiter, Maria Henkel, Wilhelm Reinhardt and Wolfgang G. Stock

The purpose of this paper is to show how the coverage of publications is represented in information services. Academic citation databases (Web of Science, Scopus, Google…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how the coverage of publications is represented in information services. Academic citation databases (Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar) and scientific social media (Mendeley, CiteULike, BibSonomy) were analyzed by applying a new method: the use of personal publication lists of scientists.

Design/methodology/approach

Personal publication lists of scientists of the field of information science were analyzed. All data were taken in collaboration with the scientists in order to guarantee complete publication lists.

Findings

The demonstrated calibration parameter shows the coverage of information services in the field of information science. None of the investigated databases reached a coverage of 100 percent. However Google Scholar covers a greater amount of publications than other academic citation databases and scientific social media.

Research limitations/implications

Results were limited to the publications of scientists working at an information science department from 2003 to 2012 at German-speaking universities.

Practical implications

Scientists of the field of information science are encouraged to review their publication strategy in case of quality and quantity.

Originality/value

The paper confirms the usefulness of personal publication lists as a calibration parameter for measuring coverage of information services.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Cinzia Alcidi and Daniel Gros

This paper sets out to explore three areas in which the experience of the great depression might be relevant today: monetary policy, fiscal policy, and the systemic…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to explore three areas in which the experience of the great depression might be relevant today: monetary policy, fiscal policy, and the systemic stability of banks.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical review of the US data for the 1920s and 1930s is presented and stylised facts for monetary, fiscal and banking policies during the noughties are shown and compared with those of the great depression.

Findings

The authors confirm the consensus on monetary policy: deflation and massive bank failures must be avoided. With regard to fiscal policy it is impossible to confirm a widespread opinion according to which fiscal policy did not work because it was not tried. The paper finds that fiscal policy went to the limit of what was possible under the conditions as they existed then. Policy reaction after 1932 was no less bold than that of today if one accounts for sustainability issues. Lastly, the investigation of the US banking system shows a surprising resilience of commercial banks that remained profitable, at least on average, even during the worst years.

Originality/value

First, the paper presents a systematic comparison between the great depression and the great recession, highlighting similarities and differences. Second, it suggests a relevant policy implication. Findings on commercial bank sector resilience suggest that at present national authorities have little choice but to make up for the losses on “legacy” assets and wait for banks to earn back their capital. However, to prevent future crises, at least a partial separation of commercial and investment banking seems justified.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Samuel Brittan

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Jennifer Ping‐Ngoh Foo

The transition countries have been pursuing a market economy since the early 1990s. Crucial reforms in the banking and financial sectors are necessary to provide a…

Abstract

The transition countries have been pursuing a market economy since the early 1990s. Crucial reforms in the banking and financial sectors are necessary to provide a financial structure that supports a market economy, particularly the private and enterprise sector, leading to economic growth. This paper examines the banking and financial development in the transition countries. Arguments for banking reforms are made and the conditions for an efficient banking system are examined. A comparison in the progress of banking reforms and economic growth provides useful lessons not only for the transition countries but for developing and other emerging countries. Lastly, policy choices are suggested for the transition countries.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Diego Valiante

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of the impact of the single currency on the institutional design of the banking union, through evidence on the financial…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of the impact of the single currency on the institutional design of the banking union, through evidence on the financial integration process.

Design/methodology/approach

Data analysis uses multiple sources of data on key drivers of financial fragmentation. The paper starts from a snapshot the status of financial integration and then identifies the main components of this trend.

Findings

Evidence shows that financial integration in the euro area between 2010 and 2014 retrenched at a quicker pace than outside the monetary union. Home bias persisted. Under market pressures, governments compete on funding costs by supporting “their” banks with massive state aids, which distorts the playing field and feed the risk-aversion loop. This situation intensifies frictions in credit markets, thus hampering the transmission of monetary policies and, potentially, economic growth. Taking stock of developments in the euro area, this paper discusses the theoretical framework of a banking union in a single currency area with decentralised fiscal policy sovereignty. It concludes that, when a crisis looms over, a common fiscal backstop can reduce pressures of financial fragmentation, driven by governments’ moral hazard and banks’ home bias.

Research limitations/implications

Additional research is required to deepen the empirical analysis, with econometric modelling, on the links between governments’ implicit guarantees and banks’ home bias. This is an initial data analysis.

Originality/value

Under market pressure, governments in a single currency area tend to be overprotective (more than countries with full monetary sovereignty) towards their own banking system and so trigger financial fragmentation (enhancing banks’ home bias). To revert that, a common fiscal backstop is an essential element of the institutional design. The paper shows empirical evidence and theory, as well as it identifies underlying market failures. It links the single currency to the institutional design of a banking union. This important dimension is brought into a coherent framework.

Details

Journal of Financial Economic Policy, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-6385

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Anthony Clunies Ross

The assignment of targets to instruments in developing countries cannot satisfactorily follow any simple universal rule. Which approach is appropriate is influenced by…

Abstract

The assignment of targets to instruments in developing countries cannot satisfactorily follow any simple universal rule. Which approach is appropriate is influenced by whether the economy is dominated by primary exports, by the importance of the domestic bond market and bank credit, by the extent of existing restriction in foreign exchange and financial markets, by the presence or absence of persistent high inflation, and by the existence or non‐existence of an active international market in the country's currency. Eighteen observations and maxims on stabilisation policy are tentatively drawn (pp. 64–8) from the material reviewed, and the maxims are partly summarised (pp. 69–71) in a schematic assignment, with variations, of targets to instruments.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2015

Albert Sangrà, Mercedes González-Sanmamed and Montse Guitert

This chapter aims to show how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach can be successfully used in online education. To this purpose, we will present the experience of…

Abstract

This chapter aims to show how the inquiry-based learning (IBL) approach can be successfully used in online education. To this purpose, we will present the experience of the Digital Competence Program at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, which is designed considering the principles of collaborative work, implemented with a wide range of educational resources taking advantage of ICT benefits, is delivered online, and is finally evaluated from opinions voiced by students. In addition, it is a good example of a multidisciplinary approach since it covers several disciplines and helps to acquire a number of skills that professionals require in their personal and social environments and at the workplace.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Multidisciplinary Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-847-2

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Ilya A. Surov, Vlada V. Ignateva and Andrey Y. Bazhenov

The study aims to reveal regularities of collective decision in groups of varying cooperativity and to investigate the influence of individualism–collectivism cultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to reveal regularities of collective decision in groups of varying cooperativity and to investigate the influence of individualism–collectivism cultural dimension on the emergence of collective behavioral entities.

Design/methodology/approach

An agent-based model of group behavior is used to simulate the logic of collective binary decisions defined by reaching a consensus threshold. The key parameter of the model is the cooperativity of interaction between individuals which locates the group in individualism–collectivism cultural dimension. The probabilities of collective decisions are measured as a function of individual preferences and the strength of cooperation between agents.

Findings

Strong, weak and middle point cooperativities of inter-individual interaction define three distinct regimes of collective decision logic, namely, individualism, conformism and criticality. The critical organization allows the group to generate coherent non-predetermined collective behavior in statistical agreement with individual preferences.

Research limitations/implications

Emergent collective behavior with coherent and nondeterministic decision-making can be modeled in an agent-based approach with local interaction between individuals tuned to a critical point. Variation of a single cooperativity parameter accounts for a continuous transition between organizations of the group inherent to inert matter and living systems.

Social implications

A new organization of social systems distinguished by internally relaxed relations and large-scale freedom is found beyond the traditional individualism–collectivism contraposition. This state is reached by tuning behavioral logic of individuals to a critical balance of individual and collective values.

Originality/value

Individualist, conformist and critical regimes of collective organization distinct in terms of integrity, complexity and determinism are recognized as universal organizational classes of nature spanning both inert and living systems. In particular, individualist and conformist regimes produce simple deterministic behavior typical for gases and solid bodies, whereas the critical organization generates complex nondeterministic behavior inherent to living organisms.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 May 2015

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Multidisciplinary Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-847-2

1 – 10 of 33