Search results

1 – 10 of 21
Article
Publication date: 5 December 2018

Maude Brunet, Ali Motamedi, Louis-Martin Guénette and Daniel Forgues

Given the ongoing digital transformation, building information modeling (BIM) has great potential to create a collaborative environment in the whole lifecycle of the built…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the ongoing digital transformation, building information modeling (BIM) has great potential to create a collaborative environment in the whole lifecycle of the built asset, from inception to decommissioning. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper relates current developments in Québec with regard to the use of BIM for asset management (AM). The steps taken by three public organizations to develop their capabilities and take advantage of new possibilities are presented. The main methodological approach is based on participant observation, through case studies complemented by a questionnaire.

Findings

This paper reports on results and analysis of an important module of a broader research project on the impact of new technologies and collaborative methods for projects and AM. The results of this first research module points to the importance of using pilot projects to develop a continuous improvement approach, where feedback loops from projects support the development of AM capabilities and culture. Another important finding is the importance of sharing experience for the three public organizations involved.

Originality/value

The main contributions of this paper are to document this overarching research program and to gain deeper insights by reflexively considering the steps taken and the ones ahead for the quest to enhance the transfer of information for built assets at the end of projects to the operations and maintenance phase and to use BIM for operation.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Maude Brunet and Daniel Forgues

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a case of collective sensemaking about the project success of the multifunctional amphitheater of Quebec (Canada).

1086

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a case of collective sensemaking about the project success of the multifunctional amphitheater of Quebec (Canada).

Design/methodology/approach

For this explorative and qualitative research, the authors started from the post-mortem document and complemented their comprehension with six semi-structured interviews with the main project actors and other public documents regarding this project.

Findings

According to the respondents, the main success factors of this project can be attributed to: a clear governance structure; proven project management and construction methods; the use of emerging collaborative practices in construction (such as building information modeling (BIM) and lean construction); an adapted policy for procurement; as well as a code of values and ethics shared by all stakeholders.

Originality/value

The sensemaking perspective has been scarcely mobilized in project management studies, emerging from a constructivist view of reality and being sensitive about material-discursive practices. This exploratory study explores a case of collective sensemaking of a major project success and suggests avenues for major and megaprojects research. Lessons learned and implications for practice are also outlined. The conclusion allows a synthesis and an opening to consider how practitioners and researchers can build on this (and other successful) case(s) for future projects and research.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Daniel Forgues and Lauri Koskela

The purpose of the paper is to study the influence of procurement on the performance of integrated design teams.

5226

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to study the influence of procurement on the performance of integrated design teams.

Design/methodology/approach

The research paradigm is based on Russian socio‐constructivist approach to activity theory. Activity theory, as opposed to natural or social science, is a design science approach that focuses on the context aspect of project. A triangulation of qualitative research methods is used to investigate the dynamic of integrated teams in two different procurement contexts.

Findings

The paper is conclusive regarding the influence of procurement on team efficiency. It demonstrates that traditional procurement processes reinforce socio‐cognitive barriers that hinder team efficiency. It also illustrates how new procurement modes can transform the dynamic of relationships between the client and the members of the supply chain, and have a positive impact on team performance.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates first that problems with integrated design team efficiency are related to context and not process – they are not technical but socio‐cognitive; second that fragmented transactional contracting increases socio‐cognitive barriers that hinder integrated design team performance; third that new forms of relational contracting may help to mitigate socio‐cognitive barriers and improve integrated design team performance, fourth that changing the context through procurement does not address the problem of obsolete design practices.

Originality/value

The paper brings together theories of production in lean construction and social learning as a rival approach to traditional project management theory for demonstrating the importance of context on team performance.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Erik Poirier, Sheryl Staub-French and Daniel Forgues

The purpose of this paper is to study the radical innovation process behind the adoption and implementation of building information modelling (BIM) for a specialty…

2371

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the radical innovation process behind the adoption and implementation of building information modelling (BIM) for a specialty contracting small or medium enterprise (SME). This paper offers two distinct perspectives on BIM adoption and implementation, which are underrepresented in the current literature: the SME perspective and the specialty contractor perspective. It also attempts to bridge the gap between the growing literature on BIM adoption and implementation and the established literature on innovation by developing the notion of embedded contexts in the innovation process.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method, longitudinal case study approach was used in this research project to study the evolution of the innovation process and its impact on the Organisation over time. The objectives of this research were to investigate and document the different factors mediating the BIM adoption and implementation process for the Organisation across various contexts, the mechanisms put in place to facilitate this process and the perceived impact within the Organisation.

Findings

The initial transition to BIM represented a radical innovation for the Organisation. Subsequently, a series of incremental innovations took place to further advance the Organisation’s BIM capabilities. This innovation process is influenced by different layers of embedded contextual factors, which can be mitigated by, among others, a clear strategic approach towards the innovation process. Furthermore, despite a limited sphere of influence, specialty contractors can leverage BIM within their own supply chain to reap significant benefits.

Originality/value

This paper offers an in-depth study of radical innovation within a specialty contracting SME. This study discusses the influence of four embedded contexts on innovation for a specialty contracting SME: the industry context, the institutional context, the organisational context and the project context. It also offers insight into the factors, mechanisms and their impact on the innovation process.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Derek H.T. Walker

547

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2022

Temidayo Oluwasola Osunsanmi, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Wellington Didibhuku Thwala and Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke

The model and existing practice of the construction supply chain (CSC) in the United Kingdom (UK) and Australia was presented in this chapter. The policies and reports…

Abstract

The model and existing practice of the construction supply chain (CSC) in the United Kingdom (UK) and Australia was presented in this chapter. The policies and reports that support the practice of the CSC were examined in both countries. It was discovered from the review of literature that the UK has a more detailed report targeted at improving the CSC than Australia. However, both countries have a common factor affecting their CSC which originates from fragmentation experienced within their supply chain. Construction stakeholders in the UK and Australia believe that collaboration and integration are vital components for improving performance. The majority of the contractors in both countries embrace collaborative working for the sole purpose of risk sharing, access to innovation and response to market efficiency. However, most of the models developed for managing the CSC in the UK are built around building information modelling (BIM). Also, the reviewed studies show that supply chain management practice will be effective following the following principle: shared objectives, trust, reduction in a blame culture, joint working, enhanced communication and information-sharing. Finally, the UK has a more established framework and more CSC models compared to Australia.

Details

Construction Supply Chain Management in the Fourth Industrial Revolution Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-160-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2019

Glenn Costin, Akari Nakai Kidd, Timothy Simon and David John Edwards

Framed as a pilot study, the purpose of this paper is to study the perceived appropriateness of an existing collaborative procurement procedure (CPP) framework from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Framed as a pilot study, the purpose of this paper is to study the perceived appropriateness of an existing collaborative procurement procedure (CPP) framework from the housebuilder’s perspective, seeking to improve its utility and stimulate further exploration.

Design/methodology/approach

Informed by an existing CPP framework and conducted by a UK-based development professional, four in-depth semi-structured interviews were undertaken with senior housebuilding practitioners from London and surrounding counties. A qualitative analysis was then conducted for this sociological study.

Findings

Perceived appropriateness of the framework was high; however, a number of procedural improvements were identified, along with limitations. Future studies are recommended including the influence upon project performance of groundworker integration at the design stage.

Research limitations/implications

Limited to four interviews from one regional area, the study provides an initial insight into the appropriateness of an existing CPP framework. Insights into why CP uptake is marginal within housebuilding were also gained. The research purpose was achieved but by offering a self-reflection upon practice (vis-à-vis wider generalisations), the findings provide a springboard for further studies.

Practical implications

The research identifies with current practice, industry perceptions and paths towards improving the utility of the CPP framework.

Social implications

This study offers insights into the perceptions of private housebuilding practitioners of their own practices and the factors they find challenging within the social constructs of their industry.

Originality/value

This research constitutes one of the first studies in the UK to examine the CPP framework from the perspective of the private housebuilder and is undertaken with the express purpose of furthering that framework’s utility.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Jakob Müllner and Igor Filatotchev

In this chapter, the authors review emerging literature on multidimensional, information age-related phenomena across different disciplines to derive common themes and…

Abstract

In this chapter, the authors review emerging literature on multidimensional, information age-related phenomena across different disciplines to derive common themes and topics. The authors then proceed to analyse recent developments in these fields to provide an interdisciplinary overview of the most disruptive challenges for multinational companies (MNCs) competing in the modern information age. These challenges include more efficient peer-to-peer communication between stakeholders, crowd-organisation, globalisation of value chains and the need to organise knowledge resources. The aim of the chapter is not to review all age research, but to identify fundamental uncertainties for MNCs and discuss strategies of tackling such information age phenomena from an international business perspective.

Abstract

Details

How to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a School-Based Intervention: Evaluating the Impact of the Philosophy for Children Programme on Students' Skills
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-003-7

Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2022

Temidayo Oluwasola Osunsanmi, Clinton Ohis Aigbavboa, Wellington Didibhuku Thwala and Ayodeji Emmanuel Oke

This chapter focused on presenting the result of the Delphi study from the questionnaire distributed to the experts. The Delphi technique was used for modelling the…

Abstract

This chapter focused on presenting the result of the Delphi study from the questionnaire distributed to the experts. The Delphi technique was used for modelling the construction supply chain management (CSCM) practice in the fourth industrial revolution (4IR) era. The technique was also used to predict the supply chain management's (SCM) possible trends in the construction industry. A total of 15 experts were selected for this study based on their working experience. The Delphi study also validated the gaps (organisational culture and 4IR component) identified from the existing CSCM model. The findings from the Delphi study revealed that organisational culture has a significant impact on the practice of CSCM in the 4IR era. Regarding adopting the 4IR component for the CSCM in Nigeria, the Delphi study revealed that smart management and virtualisation are the most adopted. Unfortunately, the cyber-physical system, the heartbeat of the 4IR, is yet to be fully implemented for CSCM practice in the Nigerian construction industry.

Details

Construction Supply Chain Management in the Fourth Industrial Revolution Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-160-3

Keywords

1 – 10 of 21