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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Daniel Cunliffe

The number and range of organisations developing a Web site is growing rapidly. Many of these Web sites are developed in‐houseeven though the skills and resources required…

Abstract

The number and range of organisations developing a Web site is growing rapidly. Many of these Web sites are developed in‐houseeven though the skills and resources required for developing a successful site may not be available. It is argued that some of the limitations in terms of resources and skills inherent in the small‐scale in‐house development environment can be overcome through the adoption of an informal Web site development model and suitable usability methods. Presents an informal development model synthesised from a review of development case studies and published Web research literature. This model identifies the main stages and tasks of development. A review of information gathering and usability methods currently being employed is integrated into the model. The importance of understanding user and information provider needs is discussed. A number of common usability methods are then examined in greater detail. The appropriateness of the model and methods for the small‐scale in‐house development environment is considered.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

Daniel Cunliffe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of Welsh‐language provision on the web sites of political parties contesting the 2007 Welsh Assembly elections.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of Welsh‐language provision on the web sites of political parties contesting the 2007 Welsh Assembly elections.

Design/methodology/approach

Expert inspection was carried out on the web sites of 18 of the 19 parties contesting the election. Goal‐directed walkthroughs were conducted on four web sites judged to be making a bilingual provision.

Findings

Overall, the Welsh language was highly marginalised. While Welsh‐language elements were identified on ten of the 18 web sites, only four web sites attempted to make a bilingual provision. On three of these, a user intending to interact with the web site through the medium of Welsh would still encounter English language content and/or navigation. Only one web site offered a fully Welsh‐language experience.

Research limitations/implications

This paper only considers the web sites of political parties and presents only a high level analysis. It does not consider the impact of Welsh‐language provision on the electorate.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to systematically examine Welsh‐language provision on party web sites during elections for the National Assembly for Wales. In contrast to many studies of election‐related internet activity in the UK, it considers a regional election rather than a UK general election.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Douglas Tudhope, Ceri Binding, Dorothee Blocks and Daniel Cunliffe

The purpose of this paper is to explore query expansion via conceptual distance in thesaurus indexed collections

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore query expansion via conceptual distance in thesaurus indexed collections

Design/methodology/approach

An extract of the National Museum of Science and Industry's collections database, indexed with the Getty Art and Architecture Thesaurus (AAT), was the dataset for the research. The system architecture and algorithms for semantic closeness and the matching function are outlined. Standalone and web interfaces are described and formative qualitative user studies are discussed. One user session is discussed in detail, together with a scenario based on a related public inquiry. Findings are set in context of the literature on thesaurus‐based query expansion. This paper discusses the potential of query expansion techniques using the semantic relationships in a faceted thesaurus.

Findings

Thesaurus‐assisted retrieval systems have potential for multi‐concept descriptors, permitting very precise queries and indexing. However, indexer and searcher may differ in terminology judgments and there may not be any exactly matching results. The integration of semantic closeness in the matching function permits ranked results for multi‐concept queries in thesaurus‐indexed applications. An in‐memory representation of the thesaurus semantic network allows a combination of automatic and interactive control of expansion and control of expansion on individual query terms.

Originality/value

The application of semantic expansion to browsing may be useful in interface options where thesaurus structure is hidden.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 62 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2020

Joona Keränen and Daniel D. Prior

This paper highlights the suitability, application and fruitful opportunities for ethnographic methodologies in contemporary B2B service research.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper highlights the suitability, application and fruitful opportunities for ethnographic methodologies in contemporary B2B service research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a literature review and conceptual analysis of ethnographic research methodology and B2B service literatures.

Findings

This paper discusses the central features of ethnographic research methodologies, their key differences to other qualitative methodologies, key trends in contemporary B2B service research and opportunities for ethnographic research methodologies in selected priority areas.

Research limitations/implications

This paper highlights the opportunities, unique strengths and specific advantages of ethnographic research methodologies to advance B2B service research and theory development.

Practical implications

This paper encourages B2B firms to undertake ethnographic field projects to better understand customers’ roles, experiences and usage processes that relate to B2B services.

Originality/value

Ethnographic research approaches have been largely overlooked or neglected in B2B service research. This paper highlights their potential, suggests areas for application and encourages B2B service researchers to adopt ethnographic approaches to delve deeper into the social and cultural aspects of B2B services

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2012

Sid Lowe, Slawek Magala and Ki‐Soon Hwang

The aim of this paper is to focus on methodological development of research into the influence of culture: the use of cross‐cultural, multidisciplinary and multi‐method techniques.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to focus on methodological development of research into the influence of culture: the use of cross‐cultural, multidisciplinary and multi‐method techniques.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a review of the interdisciplinary debate in business research, general management, IB and cross‐cultural management. It then explores the identities of paradigmatic combatants and possible “strategic peace initiatives”. It finally outlines some tactical and strategic complexities of such a “peace campaign” and identifies examples where multiple‐lens research offers good potentials for “post‐war” new theory development.

Findings

Ambitious calls for the advancement of interdisciplinary research in business research have appeared regularly and often feel like déjà vu. Cultural research appears to have been locked into paradigmatic “cold” warfare between methodologically distinct research “tribes”.

Originality/value

The authors' view is that culture can be likened to a holograph. It is not a real entity but a projection, which looks very different from different positions. The concern is that views of culture have been rather “monocled” and limited in relevance.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2020

Daniel Ericsson

The purpose of the paper is to present a constructionist framework for reflection upon time in organizational change processes. The framework directs attention towards (1…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to present a constructionist framework for reflection upon time in organizational change processes. The framework directs attention towards (1) institutionalized ideas on organizational change processes anchored in different theoretical epochs, (2) institutionalized norms and virtues that govern the development of specific time regimes in organizations and (3) subjective opportunistic expectations of the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is essayistic in character.

Findings

The paper explores how constructions of time might be biased by managerial leaders' opportunistic enactment of specific institutionalized ideas anchored in different theoretical epochs in order to comply with culturally embedded and mediated managerial virtues such as being fast and vigorous.

Research limitations/implications

The paper opens up for a differentiated understanding of time in organizational change processes, and it pinpoints the assumptions that guide both theoretical discussions on time, as well as empirical studies.

Practical implications

The framework proffers the reflective practitioner the opportunity to develop informed expectations on time in relation to organizational change processes.

Social implications

A nuanced and differentiated understanding of how time is construed in organizational change processes might reduce the social costs of underestimating the time organizational changes take – or exaggerating the belief in managerial leaders as sovereigns of time.

Originality/value

The paper contributes with a critical understanding of how time is construed in organizational change processes.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Learning Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-431-9

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Maurice Yolles, Gerhard Fink and Daniel Dauber

Modelling the organisation to enable purposeful analysis and diagnosis of its ills is often problematic. This is illustrated by the unconnected non‐synergistic plurality…

Abstract

Purpose

Modelling the organisation to enable purposeful analysis and diagnosis of its ills is often problematic. This is illustrated by the unconnected non‐synergistic plurality of organisational models each of which relates to a particular isolated frame of thought and purpose. A cybernetic approach is adopted to create a generic psychosocial model for the organisation that is used to characterise its emergent normative personality. Organisations are often complex, and seeing them in terms of their normative personality can reduce the complexity and enable a better understanding of their pathologies. This paper seeks to do two things. The first is to show that it is possible to set up a generic model of the organisation as an agency, and the second is to show that this same model can also be represented in the alternative terms of the emergent normative personality. In order to do this, an understanding of what it is that constitutes generic criteria is required. In addition, the paper shall show that organisational and personality theories can be connected generically. One of the consequences of the theory is that the patterns of behaviour which occur in an agency have underlying trait control processes.

Design/methodology/approach

A meta‐systemic view of the organisation is adopted through knowledge cybernetics that enables more flexibility and formality when viewing organisational models. The paper develops a formal generic model of the organisation that should facilitate the exploration of problem situations both theoretically and empirically.

Findings

The outcome of the research formulates the cognitive processes of normative personality as a feasible way of explaining organisations and provide a capacity to analyse and predict the likelihood of their behavioural conduct and misconduct. As an agency trait model, agency explains the socio‐cognitive aspects of self‐organisation and the efficacy of connections between the traits. These traits control the personality, and inter‐trait connections are Piagetian intelligences that orient the traits and work through forms of first‐ and second‐order autopoiesis. The development of a typology of pathologies is also suggested as feasible.

Originality/value

There are previous metaphorical notions that link agency with traits. Here, metaphor is extended to produce a formal model for the emergent normative personality. This is the first time that socio‐cognitive and trait approaches are formally linked, as it is the fist time that a typology for organisational pathologies is proposed.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 40 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2018

Casey Daniel Hoeve

Despite its growing popularity, there is a noticeable absence of references to the inclusion of genealogy and family history studies within the field of digital…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite its growing popularity, there is a noticeable absence of references to the inclusion of genealogy and family history studies within the field of digital humanities. New forms of inclusiveness, particularly in production-coding and cultural analysis, closely align genealogy and family history with the core tenants practiced among humanities computing and digital humanities. This paper aims to prove that genealogy as family history should be formally recognized within this cohort, as it can serve as a valuable and innovative partner for advocacy and technological advancement of the field.

Design/methodology/approach

By examining the literature, genealogy will be defined according to its use in the digital humanities, as well as its use in family history studies. The core tenants of humanities computing and digital humanities will be identified and compared against the research methodology and technological tools used in genealogy and family history research. The comparison will determine how closely the fields align, and if genealogy defined as family history should be used, and included within the field of digital humanities.

Findings

The progression of genealogy and family history from production to cultural analysis corresponds with the transition of production and coding (influenced by humanities computing) to the inclusion of experimental cultural research adopted by the digital humanities. Genealogy’s use of technological tools, such as databases, text encoding, data-text mining, graphic information systems and DNA mapping, demonstrates the use of coding and production. Cultural analysis through demographic study, crowdsourcing and establishing cultural connections illustrates new methods of scholarship, and connects coding and cultural criticism, serving as a bridge between digital humanities and the humanities at large. As genealogy continues to create new partnerships of a collaborative nature, it can, and will, continue to contribute to new areas of study within the field. As these practices continue to converge with the digital humanities, genealogy should be recognized as a partner and member in the digital humanities cohort.

Originality/value

Despite its growing popularity, there is a noticeable absence of references to the inclusion of genealogy and family history studies within the field of the digital humanities. The term genealogy resonates differently within the digital humanities, primarily articulating the history of the field over the study and research of family lineage. This study seeks to demonstrate how genealogy and family history can fit within the digital humanities, providing a new perspective that has not yet been articulated in the scholarly literature.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2013

Abstract

Details

Getting Things Done
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-954-6

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