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1 – 10 of 32
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jens Hamprecht, Daniel Corsten, Manfred Noll and Evelyn Meier

For the food industry, the depletion of arable land and a growing world population demand controlling the sustainability of agricultural inputs to the industry…

15320

Abstract

Purpose

For the food industry, the depletion of arable land and a growing world population demand controlling the sustainability of agricultural inputs to the industry. Controlling the sustainability of these supplies means controlling the economic, social, and environmental performance of the supply chain. In practice, little is known about how companies can efficiently extend their existing supply chain controls to cover these aspects. This paper tries to address this particular gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a method for integrating controls of social and environmental performance in a supply chain controlling framework. This method is illustrated with case studies on Nestlé's food supply chains.

Findings

The case studies highlight why quality controls along the whole food supply chain are an import precondition for controlling sustainability.

Originality/value

This study is useful for the food industry in the control of sustainability of agricultural inputs to the industry.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Daniel Corsten and Jan Felde

To examine the conditions under which the proposed benefits of collaboration between a firm and its suppliers will occur.

6950

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the conditions under which the proposed benefits of collaboration between a firm and its suppliers will occur.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines buyer‐supplier relationships from the point of view of the buying firm. The paper is based on a Swiss sample of OEM‐supplier relationships. The research question is empirically tested employing a sample of 135 Swiss buyer‐supplier relationships and using structured equation modelling as well as multi‐group comparison to test for quasi‐moderation effects. In this paper it is investigated under which condition collaboration with key suppliers is beneficial for buyers. By linking collaboration with key performance measures and contrasting its effects with relational constructs like trust and dependence it is hoped to add to the growing literature on inter‐organizational relationships in supply chain contexts.

Findings

The results demonstrate that supplier collaboration has a positive effect on buyer performance both in terms of innovative capability and financial results. As expected, trust and dependence play an important role in supplier relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a single country (Switzerland) multi‐industry study. Generalizability to other industries or countries may be limited.

Practical implications

Supplier relationships need governance modes that balance control and relational elements. Relationship controlling is an important element in building successful supplier relationships. In order to be able to reap the benefits of collaboration for the entire company, the purchasing department needs incentives that support relationship building. Managers leading a purchasing department can learn what structural elements and processes are necessary to obtain optimal benefits from their supply base.

Originality/value

From a manager's viewpoint, this paper will provide additional insight into when and how collaboration can improve financial performance, enhance innovation, and reduce transaction costs..

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Melanie Schreiner and Daniel Corsten

With the advent of the resource-based and dynamic capabilities views of the firm, researchers of collaborative relationships have raised the question as to whether…

Abstract

With the advent of the resource-based and dynamic capabilities views of the firm, researchers of collaborative relationships have raised the question as to whether superior management of such relationships does indeed explain observed differences in collaborative performance of individual firms. While most research to-date has concentrated on antecedents and development of such management capabilities, in this chapter we propose a comprehensive construct aimed at capturing what constitutes collaborative capability. Results of an exploratory field study of vertical relationships in the software service sector suggest that collaborative capability consists of structural, cognitive, and affective dimensions. Based on our findings, we believe that the three dimensions of collaborative capability act as complements rather than substitutes, and that superior collaborative performance depends on a proper balance of the three dimensions.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Daniel Corsten and Thomas Gruen

With all the hype around efficient consumer response (ECR) and the brave new world of technologies, one would believe that retail out‐of‐stocks have gone down over the…

10414

Abstract

With all the hype around efficient consumer response (ECR) and the brave new world of technologies, one would believe that retail out‐of‐stocks have gone down over the last ten years. That is wrong. Retailers have been struggling with considerable out‐of‐stocks for decades – with little evidence of improvement. A similar wrong belief is that shoppers are also still unwilling to accept low service levels. In fact, increasingly, consumers switch brands when they do not find the brand they wanted. But retailers must be wary, because the results of our research show that increasingly shoppers switch stores quickly and may never come back. So, who is to blame? The supply chain. And where to tackle it? On the shop floor. Over the past two years, we have conducted a major, worldwide study of the extent, causes, and consumer responses to out‐of‐stocks in the fast‐moving consumer goods industry. In this article, we report these findings and provide insight to solving this chronic industry problem.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Craig Henry

462

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Adelina Broadbridge

129

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7656-1306-6

Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Michael M. Beyerlein, Douglas A. Johnson and Susan T. Beyerlein

Complex collaboration refers to situations where working together effectively across boundaries is critical for complex projects and problems. This work often involves…

Abstract

Complex collaboration refers to situations where working together effectively across boundaries is critical for complex projects and problems. This work often involves projects of large scope and long duration. The knowledge of a variety of disciplines may be involved. Such projects may cross organizational, national, and/or cultural boundaries. The problem of managing such situations includes ambitious schedules, conflict of cultures and practices, massive amounts of information, multiple languages, and ambiguity of roles and responsibilities. Complex collaboration represents a capability that is essential to effective execution in such situations as new product development, mergers and acquisitions, joint ventures, and supply chain management, as well as large government projects. A number of issues emerge in examining complex collaboration, including: unit of analysis, critical relationships, resource development, virtual teaming, key skills, and improvement processes.

Details

Complex Collaboration: Building the Capabilities for Working Across Boundaries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-288-7

1 – 10 of 32