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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

Daniel C. Bello and Gloria J. Barczak

Considers how research carried out during trade shows can helpindustrial firms to manage the new product development process.Discusses the NPD process and offers a scheme…

Abstract

Considers how research carried out during trade shows can help industrial firms to manage the new product development process. Discusses the NPD process and offers a scheme for classifying trade fairs, thus making the selection of appropriate events easier for the industrial marketer. Develops recommendations for the conducting of new product research at trade shows and concludes that while not a substitute for traditional NPD research methods due to cost limitations and the different types of attendees present at various events, good opportunities exist for industrial exhibitors to use NPD stages such as idea generation, screening and testing at trade shows rather than concentrating on the commercialization of new products.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/07363769210037024. When citing…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/07363769210037024. When citing the article, please cite: Gloria J. Barczak, Daniel C. Bello, Everett S. Wallace, (1992), “The Role of Consumer Shows in New Product Adoption”, Journal of Consumer Marketing, Vol. 9 Iss: 2, pp. 55 - 64.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Daniel C. Bello, David J. Urban and Bronislaw J. Verhage

Although instability characterises export channels, little researchhas examined the interfirm evaluations that are related to amanufacturer′s continued use of export…

Abstract

Although instability characterises export channels, little research has examined the interfirm evaluations that are related to a manufacturer′s continued use of export middlemen. In this research, a manufacturer′s evaluations of its international intermediary are divided into performance, dependence, and importance dimensions. Theoretical and empirical literatures are used to frame hypotheses linking each evaluative dimension to an aspect of the manufacturer′s channel design strategy. The results show that manufacturers′ evaluations of their middlemen are systematically related to the economic and organisational strategies used by manufacturers. The discussion draws important implications for managing the indirect export channel.

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International Marketing Review, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

Nicholas C. Williamson and Daniel C. Bello

The instability of the relationships which Export Management Companies have with their Manufacturer‐Suppliers is, perhaps, the most pressing problem which the EMCs have in…

Abstract

The instability of the relationships which Export Management Companies have with their Manufacturer‐Suppliers is, perhaps, the most pressing problem which the EMCs have in their long‐term development as viable export marketing channel entities. Three different variables were empirically tested as possibly affecting the stability of EMC/M‐S relationships: (1) the “operating arrangement” which the EMC has with the M‐S; (2) whether or not the EMC “takes title” to products which it markets abroad; and (3) the size of a given M‐S's export sales generated by the EMC. All three variables were shown to affect the stability of the EMC/M‐S dyadic relationship.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Gloria J. Barczak, Daniel C. Bello and Everett S. Wallace

Discusses the increasing use of the show by marketers as a mediumto launch new products. Analyses adoption theory and key characteristicsof the show setting to explain how…

Abstract

Discusses the increasing use of the show by marketers as a medium to launch new products. Analyses adoption theory and key characteristics of the show setting to explain how shows facilitate the acceptance of innovative consumer goods. Concludes that success depends on: organizing the exhibits and relevant information, integrating shows into product launches, and post‐show marketing.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Daniel C. Bello and Bronislaw J. Verhage

This article examines industrial channel management in aninternational context by analysing whether the industrial firm performsexport functions itself or whether it…

Abstract

This article examines industrial channel management in an international context by analysing whether the industrial firm performs export functions itself or whether it transfers these functions to an export middleman. Export theory suggests that certain firm and market characteristics determine whether these tasks will be self‐performed or spun off to a channel intermediary. Hypotheses based on theory are tested on a sample of 225 Dutch exporters. Export sales volume was found to be associated with the performance of tasks required to stimulate, but not supply, foreign demand. However, industrial exporters tend to self‐perform tasks when middlemen are located in distant foreign markets. The findings suggest that an industrial firm′s desire to control export task performance offsets economic incentives to transfer certain channel functions to export intermediaries.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2006

Varinder M. Sharma, Vincent P. Taiani and Arif A. Sariteke

The impact of e‐business on export management companies (EMCs) has been debated for some time and several reasons for their survival have been forwarded. Based upon the…

Abstract

The impact of e‐business on export management companies (EMCs) has been debated for some time and several reasons for their survival have been forwarded. Based upon the resource‐based perspective of the firm, this study provides a far more fundamental reason for the survival of the well‐established EMCs‐their market‐based assets. Furthermore, this study analyzes the impact of e‐business proliferation on the well‐established EMCs transaction creating and physical fulfillment exporting services and their efficiency and effectiveness.

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International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Daniel C. Bello and Lee D. Dahringer

This study examines the extent to which retailer's country of origin and product assortment influence retailer operating practices. Although conventional wisdom suggests…

Abstract

This study examines the extent to which retailer's country of origin and product assortment influence retailer operating practices. Although conventional wisdom suggests practices are likely to vary by country, universal aspects of the retailing task may lead to similarities in retailing practices for a given product, regardless of national setting. To empirically investigate whether country or product is the dominant influence in determining retailer behavior, data on retailer activities in India and Africa is examined.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Jeffrey E. Lewin and Daniel C. Bello

In institutional settings, the decision to adopt technically innovative products is usually made jointly by individuals representing various functional groups. Each…

Abstract

In institutional settings, the decision to adopt technically innovative products is usually made jointly by individuals representing various functional groups. Each individual participant exerts significant influence over the adoption decision; and often the needs and concerns of various participants and groups differ. These characteristics contribute to the complexity of the purchase decision process and accentuate barriers to adoption, thus presenting special challenges for marketers of technically innovative products. The research discussed was designed to investigate the purchase decision process for technically innovative products in institutional markets. The US educational market provides the setting for the investigation. This market’s purchasing process is similar to a variety of tax‐funded institutional markets (e.g. governmental agencies, public health care facilities). Additionally, this market is significant ‐ in its own right ‐ for two important reasons: (1) it currently spends $225 billion annually, and (2) it significantly affects the future socio‐economic success of the USA. The results of the investigation provide important insights into the problems associated with marketing technically innovative products to these types of institutional markets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2010

Jennifer L. Fries, Anna M. Turri, Daniel C. Bello and Ronn J. Smith

Radio frequency identification (RFiD) programs are being mandated by many entities, such as Wal‐Mart and the Department of Defense, but what factors lead to successful…

Abstract

Purpose

Radio frequency identification (RFiD) programs are being mandated by many entities, such as Wal‐Mart and the Department of Defense, but what factors lead to successful implementation of these programs by their business partners?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in nature. It briefly reviews current applications of RFiD technology and proposes a model for RFiD implementation through partners.

Findings

While some companies are quickly adopting RFiD technology, little is known regarding important factors for successful implementation. To address the interorganizational nature of RFiD, this research uses assimilation theory to provide insight as to the key factors impacting the deployment of this technology across trading partners.

Originality/value

The paper provides a theory‐based framework for companies' RFiD initiatives and identifies specific factors that enable a business partner to implement successfully an RFiD technology program initiated by a powerful supplier or customer.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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