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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Nikolaos Georgantzis and Efi Vasileiou

This article tests whether workers are indifferent between risky and safe jobs provided that, in labor market equilibrium, wages should serve as a utility equalizing…

Abstract

This article tests whether workers are indifferent between risky and safe jobs provided that, in labor market equilibrium, wages should serve as a utility equalizing device. Workers’ preferences are elicited through a partial measure of overall job satisfaction: satisfaction with job-related risk. Given that selectivity turns out to be important, we use selectivity corrected models. Results show that wage differentials do not exclusively compensate workers for being in dangerous jobs. However, as job characteristics are substitutable in workers’ utility, they could feel satisfied, even if they were not fully compensated financially for working in dangerous jobs.

Details

New Analyses of Worker Well-Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-056-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Ebru Ipek and Philipp Paulus

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which a destination's security level affects the relationship between personality traits and individuals'…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which a destination's security level affects the relationship between personality traits and individuals' expatriation willingness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply an experimental vignette methodology using a 2 × 1 between subjects-design with two destinations characterized by different security levels (dangerous vs. safe) among 278 participants (students and employees). Partial least squares multigroup analysis (PLS-MGA) was employed to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings indicate that different personality variables appear to impact individuals' expatriation willingness depending on the security level of a destination: emotionality and conscientiousness predicted expatriation willingness to dangerous environments, whereas openness to experience predicted expatriation willingness to safe environments. The personality traits of honesty–humility, extraversion and agreeableness were not found to influence expatriation willingness in either scenario.

Practical implications

The study discusses a set of practical recommendations for the selection and the management of eligible individuals who are willing to expatriate to dangerous locations.

Originality/value

The study is among the first to examine the influence of personality on expatriation willingness in safe and dangerous environments at the same time. It advances prior research by providing a more nuanced understanding of the context-specific effects of personality on expatriation willingness.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Sebastian Stoermer, Samuel E. Davies, Oliver Bahrisch and Fedor Portniagin

Corporate business activities can require expatriates to relocate to dangerous countries. Applying the expectancy value theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Corporate business activities can require expatriates to relocate to dangerous countries. Applying the expectancy value theory, the purpose of this paper is to investigate differences in female and male expatriates in their relocation willingness to dangerous countries as a function of sensation seeking. The authors further examine money orientation as a moderator of the effects of sensation seeking.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample is comprised of 148 expatriates currently residing in safe host countries. The authors build and examine a moderated mediation model using the PROCESS tool.

Findings

The results show that male expatriates are more sensation seeking than female expatriates. Further, the results indicate a positive main effect of sensation seeking on relocation willingness to dangerous countries. Most importantly, sensation seeking was found to mediate the effects of gender on relocation willingness. Accordingly, male expatriates are more willing to relocate to dangerous countries due to higher sensation seeking. Money orientation was not found to interact with sensation seeking.

Research limitations/implications

The authors analyzed cross-sectional data. Future studies are encouraged to use multi-wave research designs and to examine further predictors, as well as mediators and moderators of relocation willingness to dangerous countries. Another limitation is the low number of organizational expatriates in the sample.

Practical implications

The study provides implications for the process of selecting eligible individuals who are willing to relocate to dangerous countries.

Originality/value

The study is among the first research endeavors to investigate antecedents of expatriates’ relocation willingness to dangerous countries. The authors also introduce the sensation seeking construct to the literature on expatriation management.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

J.R. Carby‐Hall

One of the common law duties owed by the employer is his duty to take reasonable care for the safety of his employee. This common law duty is an implied term in the…

Abstract

One of the common law duties owed by the employer is his duty to take reasonable care for the safety of his employee. This common law duty is an implied term in the contract of employment and is therefore contractual in nature. Because of the difficulties which may arise in bringing an action in contract for breach of the employer's duty of care, the employee who has sustained injuries during the course of his employment (although he may sue either in contract of tort will normally bring a tort action.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 31 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1967

Viscount Dilhorne, Reid, Hodson, Guest and Pearson

June 20, 1967 Factory — Dangerous machinery (fencing) — “Machinery” — Mobile crane — Part of equipment of factory — Dangerous parts — Obligation to fence — Factories Act

Abstract

June 20, 1967 Factory — Dangerous machinery (fencing) — “Machinery” — Mobile crane — Part of equipment of factory — Dangerous parts — Obligation to fence — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. II, c.34), s. 14 (1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1970

Fenton Atkinson, L.J. Karminski and Gordon Willmer

October 24, 1969 Factory — Statutory duty — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving work‐piece and…

Abstract

October 24, 1969 Factory — Statutory duty — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving work‐piece and stationary bar — Automatic cooling device — Danger arising from coolant applied by hand — Practice known to employers — Whether foreseeable — Whether duty to fence — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. II, c. 34), s. 14(1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Rick Howard

This paper reviews the medico‐legal background to the development of the pilot programme for treatment and assessment of dangerous individuals with severe personality…

Abstract

This paper reviews the medico‐legal background to the development of the pilot programme for treatment and assessment of dangerous individuals with severe personality disorder. It raises the question: is personality disorder related to dangerousness, and (if so) what mediates the relationship? It then reviews recent findings suggesting that patients deemed to be dangerous and severely personality disordered are characterised by a combination of antisocial and borderline traits, and as such are a source of distress both to themselves and to others. It remains for future research to determine how this particular constellation of personality disorders is functionally linked to dangerousness, and whether the link is mediated by neuropsychological impairment resulting from early‐onset alcohol abuse, as recently proposed by Howard (2006). It is recommended that the current criteria for ‘dangerous and severe personality disorder’ be dispensed with.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1971

Hailsham L.C. of St. Marylebone, Hodson, Viscount Dilhome, Donovan and Gardiner

October 21, 1970 Factory — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving workpiece and imperceptibly…

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Abstract

October 21, 1970 Factory — Dangerous machinery — Dangerous combination of machinery and material — Danger arising from “nip” between moving workpiece and imperceptibly moving boring bar — Automatic cooling device — Coolant applied by hand — Practice known to employers — Workman's hand caught in “nip” — Whether duty on employers to fence boring bar — Whether dangerous part of machinery — Danger of accident foreseen by employers — Whether foreseeable — Workman unable to establish exactly how accident happened — Materiality — Factories Act, 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. II, c.34), s.14 (1).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

John Eastwood

In July 2002 a new EC Preparations Directive came into force requiring suppliers of preparations to consider the environmental impact of their preparations. The…

Abstract

In July 2002 a new EC Preparations Directive came into force requiring suppliers of preparations to consider the environmental impact of their preparations. The environmental assessment can be made through consideration of the individual substances used in the preparation. A review of additives used in the formulation of metalworking fluids has highlighted that there are a number of substances that give cause for concern, especially surfactants or basefluids that are derivatives of C12‐15 or C13‐15 alcohols, such as ethoxylates, propoxylates and EO/PO copolymers. Some reformulation may be required in order to prevent preparations being classified either as; dangerous for the environment; or as very toxic/toxic/harmful to aquatic organisms; or as may cause long‐term adverse effects in the environment. The new directive will require suppliers of preparations to make available material safety data sheets for preparations classified as dangerous for the environment or for preparations containing at least one dangerous substance at a concentration of = >1 per cent. The new directive will also require suppliers to use new packaging labels for; preparations classified as dangerous for the environment; preparations containing at least one dangerous substance at a concentration of =>1 per cent; and for preparations containing =>0.1 per cent of a substance classified as a sensitiser.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 54 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2022

Lyndel Bates, Marina Alexander and Julianne Webster

This paper aims to explore the link between dangerous driving and other criminal behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the link between dangerous driving and other criminal behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Arksey and O’Malley’s (2005) five-step process for scoping reviews to identify, summarise and classify identified literature was used. Within the 30-year timeframe (1990–2019), 12 studies met the inclusion criteria.

Findings

This review indicates that individuals who commit certain driving offences are more likely to also have a general criminal history. In particular, driving under the influence, driving unlicensed and high-range speeding offences were associated with other forms of criminal behaviour. Seven of the studies mentioned common criminological theories; however, they were not integrated well in the analysis. No studies used explanatory psychosocial theories that investigate social and contextual factors.

Research limitations/implications

Future research in this area would benefit from exploring individual and social influences that contribute to criminal behaviour in both contexts.

Practical implications

There is the potential to develop an information-led policing approach to improve safety on the roads and reduce wider offending behaviour. However, it is critical that road policing officers continue to focus on ensuring the road system is as safe as possible for users.

Originality/value

Criminal behaviour on the roads is often seen as a separate from other types of offending. This paper explores if, and how, these two types of offending are linked.

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