Search results

1 – 10 of 19
Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Kenneth Husted, Snejina Michailova, Dana B. Minbaeva and Torben Pedersen

This paper aims at further developing and empirically examining the concept of knowledge‐sharing hostility. It seeks to analyze reasons for hoarding knowledge, reasons for

2803

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at further developing and empirically examining the concept of knowledge‐sharing hostility. It seeks to analyze reasons for hoarding knowledge, reasons for rejecting external knowledge, and attitudes towards mistakes, as well as the influence of these factors on actual knowledge‐sharing behavior. The paper aims to examine how two specific knowledge‐governance mechanisms – commitment‐based and transaction‐based mechanisms – affect knowledge sharing

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the hypotheses on a sample of 1,639 respondents in 15 organizations in Denmark.

Findings

The authors find that the use of transaction‐based mechanisms promotes knowledge‐sharing hostility by strengthening individuals' reasons for hoarding and rejecting knowledge, and by negatively affecting individuals' attitudes towards sharing knowledge about mistakes. In contrast, the use of commitment‐based mechanisms diminishes knowledge‐sharing hostility among individuals.

Originality/value

The contribution of the paper is two‐fold. First, it responds to the clear need to examine individual characteristics related to withholding knowledge in organizations. Second, by delineating specific organizational governance mechanisms that are critical for dealing with knowledge‐sharing hostility, the research responds to the call for research aimed at explaining and detailing problems that lie in the intersection of organization and knowledge processes.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Dana B. Minbaeva

The purpose of the paper is to determine and empirically examine the effect of human resource management (HRM) practices on knowledge transfer within multinational corporations.

14575

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to determine and empirically examine the effect of human resource management (HRM) practices on knowledge transfer within multinational corporations.

Design/methodology/approach

It is suggested that the employment of human resource practices, which affect absorptive capacity of knowledge receivers and support organizational learning environment, is positively related to the degree of knowledge transfer to the subsidiary. Moreover, the higher degree of knowledge transfer is expected when HRM practices are applied as an integrated system of interdependent practices. Hypotheses derived from these arguments are tested on the data from 92 subsidiaries of Danish multinational corporations (MNCs) located in 11 countries.

Findings

Results of the analysis indicated the existence of two groups of HRM practices conducive to knowledge transfer. The simultaneous effect of the first group of HRM practices consisting of “staffing”, “training”, “promotion”, “compensation” and “appraisal” on the degree of knowledge transfer was found to be positive and substantial. The hypothesis regarding the effect of corporate socialization mechanisms and flexible working practices (the second group of HRM practices) was not supported by the data. The analysis also indicated that some HRM practices have a complementary effect on the degree of knowledge transfer when they are applied as a system.

Research limitations/implications

While this study makes a contribution to our understanding of the relationship between HRM practices and knowledge transfer in the MNC, clearly, additional research is needed to develop this link further, which until now has been largely black‐boxed.

Originality/value

Makes a contribution to our understanding of the relationship of HRM practices and knowledge transfer in MNCs.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2022

Steven McCartney and Na Fu

According to the significant growth of literature and continued adoption of people analytics in practice, it has been promised that people analytics will inform…

3058

Abstract

Purpose

According to the significant growth of literature and continued adoption of people analytics in practice, it has been promised that people analytics will inform evidence-based decision-making and improve business outcomes. However, existing people analytics literature remains underdeveloped in understanding whether and how such promises have been realized. Accordingly, this study aims to investigate the current reality of people analytics and uncover the debates and challenges that are emerging as a result of its adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducts a systematic literature review of peer-reviewed articles focused on people analytics published in the Association of Business School (ABS) ranked journals between 2011 and 2021.

Findings

The review illustrates and critically evaluates several emerging debates and issues faced by people analytics, including inconsistency among the concept and definition of people analytics, people analytics ownership, ethical and privacy concerns of using people analytics, missing evidence of people analytics impact and readiness to perform people analytics.

Practical implications

This review presents a comprehensive research agenda demonstrating the need for collaboration between scholars and practitioners to successfully align the promise and the current reality of people analytics.

Originality/value

This systematic review is distinct from existing reviews in three ways. First, this review synthesizes and critically evaluates the significant growth of peer-reviewed articles focused on people analytics published in ABS ranked journals between 2011 and 2021. Second, the study adopts a thematic analysis and coding process to identify the emerging themes in the existing people analytics literature, ensuring the comprehensiveness of the review. Third, this study focused and expanded upon the debates and issues evolving within the emerging field of people analytics and offers an updated agenda for the future of people analytics research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Dana Minbaeva and Steen Erik Navrbjerg

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the implementation of headquarters-originated employment practices affect multinational corporation (MNC) ability to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the implementation of headquarters-originated employment practices affect multinational corporation (MNC) ability to exploit the value of organizational social capital of the acquired subsidiary.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use qualitative insights collected over 16 years from a Danish company to illustrate how a foreign MNC’s interference with the balanced structure of relations, norms, and roles in a subsidiary jeopardized the value of existing social capital.

Findings

The authors argue that changes in the collective perception of employment practices create the collective response, constructive or destructive, resulting respectively in the gain or loss of the performance benefits arising from organizational social capital.

Practical implications

The authors suggest two guidelines and two general propositions for future research on the value of organizational social capital in international takeovers.

Originality/value

The results indicate that local management and employees could use organizational social capital as a unique feature of the local business system when competing with other subsidiaries in the same MNC.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Dana B. Minbaeva and Snejina Michailova

Research on multinational corporation (MNC) knowledge transfer has argued continuously for the behavior of knowledge senders to be a determinant of knowledge transfer…

10430

Abstract

Research on multinational corporation (MNC) knowledge transfer has argued continuously for the behavior of knowledge senders to be a determinant of knowledge transfer. Although the importance of disseminative capacity regarding knowledge transfer has been illustrated in numerous conceptual studies, substantial empirical support is largely absent. Based on previous studies, re‐operationalizes disseminative capacity as being dependent upon the ability and the willingness of organizational actors to transfer knowledge where and when it is needed in the organization. Using the context of expatriation, suggests that MNCs may apply different mechanisms depending on whether they want to develop expatriates' ability or willingness to transfer knowledge. Suggests that MNCs may enhance expatriates' willingness to transfer knowledge through the employment of long‐term expatriate assignments, whereas expatriates' ability to transfer knowledge may be increased through their involvement in temporary assignments such as short‐term assignments, frequent flyer arrangements, and international commuting. Tests the hypotheses empirically based on data from 92 subsidiaries of Danish MNCs located in 11 countries.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Abstract

Details

Talent Management: A Decade of Developments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-835-8

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Snejina Michailova, Daniel J. McCarthy and Sheila M. Puffer

This introductory paper aims to outline the reasons for optimism as well as for skepticism in regard to Russia's position in the group of BRIC nations and in the global economy.

1565

Abstract

Purpose

This introductory paper aims to outline the reasons for optimism as well as for skepticism in regard to Russia's position in the group of BRIC nations and in the global economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a brief overview of developments in Russia. This discussion serves as a contextual introduction to this special issue by embracing some of the common themes elaborated in the other papers that are featured in the issue.

Findings

The paper takes a balanced perspective by discussing both positive and negative trends in Russia's development.

Originality/value

The paper sets the context in which the other papers that comprise this special issue can be situated.

Details

Critical perspectives on international business, vol. 9 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

John Boudreau and Wayne Cascio

While human capital analytics (HCA) recently has developed enormous interest, most organizations still find themselves struggling to move from operational reporting to…

4217

Abstract

Purpose

While human capital analytics (HCA) recently has developed enormous interest, most organizations still find themselves struggling to move from operational reporting to analytics. The purpose of this paper is to explore why that is the case and can be done to change that.

Design/methodology/approach

Referring to the “LAMP” model, the authors stress four elements as potential reasons why HCA are not sufficiently being “pushed” toward their audience, namely, logic, analytics, measures, and process. Similarly, they name five conditions why the wider use of HCA is not “pulled” in by the analytics user.

Findings

The authors investigations show that these “push” and “pull” factors behind the lack of greater use of HCA represent fertile ground for future research and implications for practitioners on both ends.

Practical implications

These “push” and “pull” factors behind the lack of greater use of HCA represent fertile ground for future research and implications for practitioners on both ends.

Originality/value

These “push” and “pull” factors behind the lack of greater use of HCA represent fertile ground for future research and implications for practitioners on both ends.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Lucien Alziari

The HR function has been through a palette of names and identities, with talent management or human capital management being one more. There is a lack of consistency in…

2480

Abstract

Purpose

The HR function has been through a palette of names and identities, with talent management or human capital management being one more. There is a lack of consistency in the way that HR practitioners think about talent management and this is often the cause of credibility issues with business colleagues. The purpose of this paper is to identify core beliefs that underpin the practice of talent management if the function is to build credibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies five core beliefs that should structure a discussion around, and underpin, the practice of talent management: notions of human capital management; questions about whether talent is generic or not; distinctions between talent management and HRM; decisions about who makes decisions about talent management; and moments of truth. It uses the case setting of Maersk to illustrate these beliefs and position the preferred conduct of talent management against them.

Findings

Organizations make distinctions between where good (not average) is “good enough” and where they need world-class talent to drive true competitive advantage. This capability perspective results in three different clusters of effort in terms of talent management. They manage investments so that they do not over-invest in less critical capabilities but can marshal scarce resources in areas where they need to be world class.

Practical implications

What is defined as talent in one setting might not be so in others. Strategies define capabilities and capabilities define talent. Attention must be given to all the other processes that support the deployment of talent to build specific organizational capabilities. As talent decisions are made by business leaders there needs to be a common mindset and decision-making logic for them to use. The 9 Box model is one such logic. Adopting any decision logic does not denote the outcome, rather it is how companies use the tool that determines the output.

Originality/value

The paper positions talent management within the strategic management discipline of business models and analysis of how organizations need to compete. It uses an industrial setting and professional experience base to link talent management to the wider management of organizational capabilities.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

1 – 10 of 19