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Book part
Publication date: 4 August 2015

Fabiana Moreno and Alex Coad

High-growth firms (HGFs) make a considerable contribution to economic growth, and in recent years they have received increasing interest from entrepreneurship scholars. By…

Abstract

High-growth firms (HGFs) make a considerable contribution to economic growth, and in recent years they have received increasing interest from entrepreneurship scholars. By analysing recent findings in the literature of high-growth firms, this study identifies some Stylized Facts, as well as contradictory findings, and also some unknowns regarding the determinants and internal strategies of HGFs, particularly on the persistence of their superior growth performance and the implications of recent findings for economic policy.

Details

Entrepreneurial Growth: Individual, Firm, and Region
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-047-0

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Sven-Olov Daunfeldt, Dan Johansson and Daniel Halvarsson

High-growth firms (HGFs) have attracted an increasing amount of attention from researchers and policymakers, and the Eurostat-Organisation for Economic Co-operation and…

Abstract

Purpose

High-growth firms (HGFs) have attracted an increasing amount of attention from researchers and policymakers, and the Eurostat-Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) definition of HGFs has become increasingly popular. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a longitudinal firm-level data set to analyze the implications of using the Eurostat-OECD definition.

Findings

The results indicate that this definition excluded almost 95 percent of surviving firms in Sweden, and about 40 percent of new private jobs during 2005-2008.

Research limitations/implications

The proportion of small firms and their growth patterns differ across countries, and the authors therefore advise caution in using this definition in future studies.

Practical implications

Policy based on the Eurostat-OECD definition of HGFs might be misleading or even counterproductive.

Originality/value

No previous studies have analyzed the implications of using the Eurostat-OECD definition of HGFs.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Anders Bornhäll, Dan Johansson and Johanna Palmberg

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of the entrepreneur’s quest for independence and control over the firm for governance and financing strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of the entrepreneur’s quest for independence and control over the firm for governance and financing strategies with a special focus on family firms and how they differ from nonfamily firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is based on 1,000 telephone interviews with Swedish micro and small firms. The survey data are matched with firm-level data from the Bureau van Dijks database ORBIS.

Findings

The analysis shows that independence is a prime motive for enterprises, statistically significantly more so for family owners. Family owners are more prone to use either their own savings or loans from family and are more reluctant to resort to external equity capital. Our results indicate a potential “capital constraint paradox”; there might be an abundance of external capital while firm growth is simultaneously constrained by a lack of internal funds.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that the study is based on cross-section data. Future studies could thus be based on longitudinal data.

Practical implications

The authors argue that policy makers must recognize independence and control aversion as strong norms that guide entrepreneurial action and that micro- and small-firm growth would profit more from lower personal and corporate income taxes compared to policy schemes intended to increase the supply of external capital.

Originality/value

The paper offers new insights regarding the value of independence and how it affects strategic decisions within the firm.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Kajsa Ellegärd, Dan Jonsson, Tomas Engström, Mats I. Johansson, Lars Medbo and Bertil Johansson

Presents some theoretical principles and empirical evidencerelating to the new Swedish production systems for final assembly ofmotor vehicles. Contends that in these…

Abstract

Presents some theoretical principles and empirical evidence relating to the new Swedish production systems for final assembly of motor vehicles. Contends that in these production systems it is possible simultaneously to enhance efficiency and quality of working life. Briefly sketches three production forms as they apply to the final assembly of automobiles and discusses the societal environments in which these different forms of production have evolved. Focuses on Volvo′s Swedish Uddevalla plant as one of the main examples so far of a reflective production system for final assembly of automobiles. Amplifies the analysis of different production flow patterns for final assembly and in particular addresses the issue of semi‐parallel mechanistic production flow and parallel organic production flow as alternatives to serial flow on a conventional line assembly.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 12 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Per Skedinger

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of collectively agreed increases in minimum wages for manual workers on employment transitions and hours.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of collectively agreed increases in minimum wages for manual workers on employment transitions and hours.

Design/methodology/approach

The econometric approach relies on the identification of workers affected by minimum wage changes, depending on their position in the wage distribution and contrasts outcomes for these workers to those for unaffected workers, with slightly higher wages.

Findings

The analysis suggests that separations increase as minimum wages increase and that substitution between worker groups in response to changes in minimum wages is important in retail. In general, though, hours do not change much as minimum wages increase.

Research limitations/implications

Analyses that deal with employment consequences of increasing minimum wages but disregard hours may exaggerate the overall decline in employment to the extent that job losses are concentrated among low-paid, part-time workers.

Practical implications

With union-bargained minimum wages, unions and employers need to carefully consider the effects of increasing rates on employment.

Social implications

The findings that there is a trade-off between higher wages among the low-paid and employment loss and that employment to some extent is reshuffled between individuals should be important from a welfare perspective.

Originality/value

The literature on employment effects of minimum wages is large, but very few studies are concerned with union-bargained minimum wages. The assumptions of the econometric model are tested in a novel way by imposing fictitious minimum wages on lower-level non-manuals in the same industry, with turnover characteristics similar to those of manuals but covered by a different collective agreement with non-binding actual minimum wages.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Martin Quinn and Martin R.W. Hiebl

Recent research provides useful insights on management accounting routines, yet little is written on their foundations. In particular, factors which may contribute to…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research provides useful insights on management accounting routines, yet little is written on their foundations. In particular, factors which may contribute to eventual management accounting routines have not been detailed in terms of the process of routinization. Thus, this paper aims to provide an initial theory-based understanding on the foundation of management accounting routines. In turn, it is hoped that this will raise further research interest on this topic.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on extant literature, a framework on foundations of management accounting routines is developed, and two empirical cases illustrate its operationalization.

Findings

The framework illustrates that a more complete understanding of change to management accounting routines can be gleaned when more is known about their foundations. The foundations are likely to be influenced by a combination and/or interaction of factors at the organizational level, the organizational field level and the economic and political level.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the so far limited understanding of the foundation of management accounting routines, more research is required. This framework may be useful to guide such research.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of few papers to offer an initial theory-based understanding on the foundations of management accounting routines specifically. This understanding can be built on to improve our knowledge in the management accounting domain of the complex, but ubiquitous, concept of organizational routines.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Dan Engstrom and Lars Stehn

Abstract

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2015

Massimo Garbuio, Dan Lovallo, Joseph Porac and Andy Dong

Strategic option generation is a fundamental step in strategy formulation. Several lenses have been proposed to explain its foundations, including the microeconomics…

Abstract

Strategic option generation is a fundamental step in strategy formulation. Several lenses have been proposed to explain its foundations, including the microeconomics positioning school, and the resource and capabilities based view of the firm. These approaches are largely based on inductive and deductive logics, which are not the logics that provide strategic options that are potentially novel, profitable, and largely differentiated from competitive offerings. In this chapter, we propose a unifying framework of the cognitive foundations of strategic option generation. Building on five fundamental cognitive acts – imitation, framing, analogical reasoning, abductive reasoning, and mental simulation, this proposed model both synthesizes the extant literature and provides guidance about promising avenues for future theoretical and empirical research.

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Tomas Engström, Dan Jonsson and Lars Medbo

Argues that the design of the Volvo Uddevalla plant may be described as a process with an “internal logic” in which design options were eliminated through irreversible…

Abstract

Argues that the design of the Volvo Uddevalla plant may be described as a process with an “internal logic” in which design options were eliminated through irreversible design decisions until only one alternative remained ‐ an unorthodox alternative comprising, for example, long cycle time work never used before for full‐scale production of automobiles. Contends that the most innovative features of the Uddevalla plant ‐ i.e. the detailed layout in the assembly workshops and the corresponding unorthodox production principles used ‐ were in many respects an unanticipated outcome of the design process. Pre‐existing gross layout of the plant as well as the interaction between the materials feeding techniques adopted and the operation of the automated guided vehicle system. When this was perceived by the Volvo managers, the design process had passed the point of no return, i.e. the investments made and lack of time prevented regression to more traditional layouts and production principles.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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