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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Dan Boneh

The influx of new Russian immigrants to Israel is described withthe marketing challenge that it poses to Israeli banks. Some of thesalient characteristics of this wave of…

Abstract

The influx of new Russian immigrants to Israel is described with the marketing challenge that it poses to Israeli banks. Some of the salient characteristics of this wave of immigration are delineated as well as the means employed by Israeli banks in the competition for new accounts. Bank Hapoalim′s marketing strategy is described, including in‐branch activity, advertising and promotion aids. Some research findings from a survey among newly arrived Russian immigrants are reported. The article discusses some of the social problems facing this new immigration from Russia to Israel.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2005

Andrew Nelson and Thomas Byers

Both entrepreneurship education and commercialization of university research have witnessed remarkable growth in the past two decades. These activities may be…

Abstract

Both entrepreneurship education and commercialization of university research have witnessed remarkable growth in the past two decades. These activities may be complementary in many respects, as when participation in an entrepreneurship program prepares a student to start a company based on university technology, or when technology transfer personnel provide resources and expertise for an entrepreneurship course. At the same time, however, the activities are distinct along a number of dimensions, including goals and mission, influence of market conditions, time horizon, assessment, and providers and constituency. We argue that this situation presents an organizational dilemma: How should entrepreneurship and technology transfer groups within a university maintain independence in recognition of their differences while still facilitating synergies resulting from overlapping areas of concern? In response to this dilemma, we draw on the organizational modularity perspective, which offers the normative prescription that such situations warrant autonomy for individual units, but also require a high degree of cross-unit awareness in order to capture synergies. To illustrate this perspective in an intra-university population of entrepreneurship and technology transfer groups, we present network images and statistics of inter-group relationships at Stanford University, which is widely recognized for its success in both activities. The results highlight that dependence between groups is minimal, such that groups retain autonomy in decision-making and are not dependent on others to complete their goals. Simultaneously, cross-unit awareness is high, such that groups have frequent formal and informal interactions and communication. This awareness facilitates mutually beneficial interactions between groups. As a demonstration of the actual functioning of this system, we present three thumbnail case studies that highlight positive relationships between entrepreneurship education and technology transfer. Ultimately, we argue that to fully realize the synergies between entrepreneurship education and technology transfer, we must also recognize differences between them and ensure the autonomy that such differences warrant.

Details

University Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-359-4

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Ahmed Patel, Kaveh Bakhtiyari and Mona Taghavi

This paper aims to focus on plagiarism and the consequences of anti‐plagiarism services such as Turnitin.com, iThenticate, and PlagiarismDetect.com in detecting the most…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on plagiarism and the consequences of anti‐plagiarism services such as Turnitin.com, iThenticate, and PlagiarismDetect.com in detecting the most recent cheatings in academic and other writings.

Design/methodology/approach

The most important approach is plagiarism prevention and finding proper solutions for detecting more complex kinds of plagiarism through natural language processing and artificial intelligence self‐learning techniques.

Findings

The research shows that most of the anti‐plagiarism services can be cracked through different methods and artificial intelligence techniques can help to improve the performance of the detection procedure.

Research limitations/implications

Accessing entire data and plagiarism algorithms is not possible completely, so comparing is just based on the outputs from detection services. They may produce different results on the same inputs.

Practical implications

Academic papers and web pages are increasing over time, and it is very difficult to capture and compare documents with all available data on the network in an up to date manner.

Originality/value

As many students and researchers use the plagiarism techniques (e.g. PDF locking, ghost‐writers, dot replacement, online translators, previous works, fake bibliography) to cheat in academic writing, this paper is intended to prevent plagiarism and find suitable solutions for detecting more complex kinds of plagiarism. This should also be of grave concern to teachers and librarians to provide up to date/standard anti‐plagiarism services. The paper proposes some new solutions to overcome these problems and to create more resilient and intelligent future systems.

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Abstract

Details

The Take-off of Israeli High-Tech Entrepreneurship During the 1990s
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08045-099-5

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