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Article

Fanny Fong Yee Chan, Dan Petrovici and Ben Lowe

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the marketing literature by developing and testing a conceptual model to examine the effects of product placement across a

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the marketing literature by developing and testing a conceptual model to examine the effects of product placement across a country low in assertiveness and performance orientation (the UK) and a country high in assertiveness and performance orientation (Hong Kong (HK)).

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of brand appearances in high grossing films within the UK and HK was conducted followed by a 2×2 between-subjects experiment (n=572).

Findings

The results indicate participants exposed to prominent placements have a less positive brand attitude and lower purchase intention toward the placed brand. Likewise, respondents exposed to a less well-known placed brand tend to have a less positive brand attitude and lower purchase intention toward the placed brand. There is evidence of interaction effects with cultural dimensions such as assertiveness and performance orientation within the UK and HK.

Practical implications

The results suggest that product placements can be optimized through tailored campaigns targeted at markets with known cultural characteristics. With advances in digital technology, such practices are becoming more frequent and more feasible.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore the effect of culture on perceptions of product placement and the first study to empirically examine the role of prominence and brand awareness, and their interactions with GLOBE values on the effectiveness of product placement.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article

Dan A. Petrovici and Christopher Ritson

An analysis of patterns of food consumption in Romania is undertaken with the UK used as a benchmark when appropriate. The period of transition in Romania towards a more…

Abstract

An analysis of patterns of food consumption in Romania is undertaken with the UK used as a benchmark when appropriate. The period of transition in Romania towards a more market‐oriented economy has involved substantial changes in patterns of food consumption and significant year‐to‐year variation. The decline in real incomes provides an interesting validation of Engel’s law on the relationships between household income and food expenditure. There is evidence that Romanian diet is deteriorating relative to modern nutrition guidelines; possible policy responses are discussed.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Dan Petrovici, Andrew Fearne, Rodolfo M. Nayga and Dimitris Drolias

The primary purpose is to examine the factors that affect the use of nutritional facts, nutrient content claims and health claims on food label use in the United Kingdom.

Abstract

Purpose

The primary purpose is to examine the factors that affect the use of nutritional facts, nutrient content claims and health claims on food label use in the United Kingdom.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the results of a survey of over 300 face‐to‐face interviews with shoppers of Asda, Morrisons and Sainsbury – three of the major supermarkets in the UK.

Findings

Product class involvement factors, individual characteristics, health‐related factors (nutritional knowledge, health locus of control, perceived need of dietary change), situational, attitudinal and behavioral factors were found to be significant factors affecting the use of nutritional information and nutritional and health claims on food labeling. While the use of nutritional information and health claims increases with the stated importance of “nutrition” and “family preferences”, it is less likely among shoppers for whom “taste” is an important driver of food purchasing behaviour. There is also evidence of mistrust in health claims, as indicated by the negative relationship between the consideration of such claims and the stated importance of “quality” and perceived need to “change dietary quality” – the more discerning shoppers are the least likely to consider health claims.

Originality/value

The study provides evidence that a wider range of product class involvement factors is necessary to predict the use of nutritional information and nutritional and health claims on food labeling. It also offers a conceptualization of health‐related factors to include health locus of control as a predictor of the acquisition of nutrition and health information.

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Article

Fanny Fong Yee Chan, Ben Lowe and Dan Petrovici

This research contributes to literature on marketing communication by exploring the roles of depth of processing and the dispositional factor, need for cognition (NFC), on…

Abstract

Purpose

This research contributes to literature on marketing communication by exploring the roles of depth of processing and the dispositional factor, need for cognition (NFC), on consumer perceptions of product placement.

Design/methodology/approach

A web-based experiment with a 2 (low versus high prominence) x2 (low versus high brand awareness) x2 (with versus without prior disclosure) between-subjects full factorial design was conducted.

Findings

The results indicate that prominent placements were found to elicit more extensive processing, which was negatively correlated with brand attitudes. A significant negative relationship between NFC and purchase intention towards a placed brand was also revealed.

Practical implications

The study offers managerial and policy implications for practitioners and educators. It is suggested that brand practitioners should avoid placing brands too prominently or in film genres which are cognitively demanding. The low NFC group appears to be more vulnerable to covert marketing. Therefore it is suggested that media educators target this group and plan effective media literacy programs to guard youngsters from surreptitious selling.

Originality/value

This is the first study to empirically examine the role of prominence, brand awareness and prior disclosure in the processing of product placement information and their influence on product placement effectiveness.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article

Dan Petrovici and Marin Marinov

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between determinants and primary antecedents of advertising and attitudes to advertising in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between determinants and primary antecedents of advertising and attitudes to advertising in the context of European Union accession countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on data from consumer surveys conducted in the major urban areas of Bulgaria and Romania the study conceptualises an extended version of Pollay and Mittal's model of beliefs and attitudes toward advertising. It tests a comprehensive range of attitudes toward the institution of advertising and its instruments in each country to identify similarities and differences in consumer perceptions.

Findings

Findings confirm that consumers in the two countries are more positive about advertising as an institution than the instruments used to promote advertising. While product information acquisition is the main personal use of advertising which influences general attitudes to advertising in Bulgaria, the entertaining value of advertising was found the strongest personal use in Romania. No significant differences were found in the attitudes toward the institution and instruments of advertising in the two countries.

Research limitations/implications

As data used in this study come from major urban areas in Bulgaria and Romania this might account for small research bias if the overall population of the two countries is considered. Interview bias were reduced by eliminating the verbal or non‐verbal cues to the respondents. The diverse composition of the two samples and the random selection of respondents have limited the research bias which is often a problem with other studies in Central and Eastern Europe that use predominantly convenience student samples.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that managers should focus on and exploit the overall positive general attitudes toward advertising in Romania and Bulgaria. Marketers should prioritise the informative power of advertising and use it cautiously in view of its perceived manipulative role especially to children. Advertisers need to devote more specific attention to re‐enforce the credibility of the institution of advertising in both countries.

Originality/value

The paper is a result of an original research that has extended theoretical concepts and compared their applicability to comparable EU accession contexts. Its findings suggest that advertising should be adapted to the personal uses and attitudes to advertising in the researched contexts by putting more emphasis on image building in order to increase its persuasive power and raise public trust in the institution and instruments of advertising.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Dan Petrovici, Svetla Marinova, Marin Marinov and Nick Lee

The objective of this paper is to uncover the underlying dimensions of, and examine the similarities and differences in, personal uses of advertising, perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to uncover the underlying dimensions of, and examine the similarities and differences in, personal uses of advertising, perceived socio‐economic effects of advertising, and consumer beliefs and attitudes toward advertising in Bulgaria and Romania. Moreover, it aims to identify the relative importance of the predictors of attitudes toward advertising in the two countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon findings of previous research and theoretical developments by Bauer and Greyser, Sandage and Leckenby, and Pollay and Mittal. The study uses a stratified random sample of 947 face‐to‐face interviews with adult respondents from major urban areas in Bulgaria (507) and Romania (440). Variables are measured on multi‐item scales as a typical application of the reflective indicator model.

Findings

Results show that there are significant differences between Romanian and Bulgarian respondents in terms of their attitudes toward advertising. Romanians are more positive about advertising as an institution than the instruments of advertising. Romanians seem to accept the role of advertising in a free market economy, but have less confidence in advertising claims and techniques. Bulgarian respondents seem more sceptical toward advertising in general and are less enthusiastic about embracing the role of advertising as an institution. Moreover, Bulgarians are highly negative towards the instruments advertising uses to convey its messages to consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings reflect the views of urban dwellers and may not be generalisable to the wider population of the two countries. Interviewer bias was reduced by eliminating verbal or non‐verbal cues to the respondents, and by the use of stratified random sampling.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that the regulatory role of codes of advertising practice and industry regulating bodies should be enhanced, and their ability to protect consumers enforced. Marketing campaigns should be more inclusive to involve diverse social groups and reflect generally‐accepted social norms.

Originality/value

This study reveals that, while general attitudes toward advertising may be similar, attitudes toward the institution and instruments of advertising may differ even in countries with geographic proximity and low cultural distance.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article

Zuraidah Zainol, Rusliza Yahaya, Juliana Osman and Nor Asiah Omar

This study aims to determine the effect of health knowledge on nutrition-label use and attitude, and consequently on healthy food choice among Malaysian Muslim consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to determine the effect of health knowledge on nutrition-label use and attitude, and consequently on healthy food choice among Malaysian Muslim consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts the positivist, deductive and quantitative approach. A sample consisting of 257 Muslim consumers, at least 15 years old, were selected using systematic street-intercept sampling method. Data collected using a self-administered questionnaire were analysed using descriptive statistics and structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The findings reveal the significant positive effect of health knowledge on nutrition-label use and attitude towards nutrition label, but only attitude towards nutrition label significantly predicts healthy food choice.

Research limitations/implications

Though the findings add to the existing literature, provide useful information on how nutrition label could guide the consumer to make healthier food choices and serve as a reference point that could stimulate and guide future researchers and other relevant parties, this study is limited by several factors that require replication in future research.

Originality/value

This research is perhaps one of the first attempts to consider the role of nutrition label as one of the ways to comply with the Tayyib principle.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article

Sik Sumaedi, I. Gede Mahatma Yuda Bakti, Tri Rakhmawati, Tri Widianti, Nidya J. Astrini, Sih Damayanti, M. Azwar Massijaya and Rahmi K. Jati

This research seeks to simultaneously test the effect of attitude towards the behavior of following the “Stay at Home” policy, subjective norm, perceived behavioral…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to simultaneously test the effect of attitude towards the behavior of following the “Stay at Home” policy, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, perceived susceptibility and perceived severity on people's intention to follow the “Stay at Home” policy during COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through an online survey with 148 respondents in the Greater Area of Jakarta, Indonesia. The data were then analyzed using multiple regressions.

Findings

The findings show that attitude towards the behavior, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control positively and significantly affect intention to follow “Stay at Home” during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, perceived susceptibility and perceived severity of COVID-19 do not significantly influence the intention to follow “Stay at Home” during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to the Greater Area of Jakarta, Indonesia. Furthermore, sampling was done through convenience sampling. Therefore, future research should be conducted in a different context to test the generalization of this research's findings.

Practical implications

To encourage citizens' adherence to the stay-at-home policy during the COVID-19 pandemic, they must be directed to have positive attitudes toward the policy. Financial and non-financial supports are critical to ensure citizens' ability to sufficiently observe the policy sufficiently. Another important aspect is the influence of leaders and public figures to consistently call for obedience consistently.

Originality/value

This is the first research that studies citizens' behavior related to the “Stay at Home” policy requisitioned by the government to hinder the spread of COVID-19.

Details

International Journal of Health Governance, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-4631

Keywords

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