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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Lariyah Mohd Sidek, Hidayah Basri, Hairun Aishah Mohiyaden, Nur Farazuien Md. Said, Mohd Ruzaimei Yalit, Hamdan Basri and Rashidi Sibri Muda

Flood Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar (SAB) dam in response to emergency incidents affecting…

Abstract

Flood Emergency Response Plan (ERP) is a plan that guides responsibilities for proper operation of Sultan Abu Bakar (SAB) dam in response to emergency incidents affecting the dam by high water storage capacity. Based on this study, four major responsibilities are needed for SAB dam owing to protect any probable risk for downstream which can be Incident Commander, Deputy Incident Commander, On-scene Commander and Civil Engineer. Having organisation charts based on ERP exercise can be helpful for decreasing the probable risks in any projects such as Abu Bakar Dam and it is a way to identify and suspected and actual dam safety emergencies. A dam safety emergency is an event, which could potentially lead to dam break and need to be taken care of a massive plan. To mitigate the hydro hazard due to dam break, UNITEN has developed a new application software known as INSPiRE (Interactive Dam Safety Decision Support System). INSPiRE, as an intelligent dam safety software, is developed to address emergencies, which demand fast, decision making and effective multi-agency collaboration due to SAB dam break event. INSPiRE will contribute towards the sustainability of SAB dam’s owner as corporate reputations can be ruined through dam structural failures that can affect the economy of the nation and enhance the quality of life of the people.

Details

Improving Flood Management, Prediction and Monitoring
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-552-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 July 2021

Rahsidi Sabri Muda, Ainul Bahiah Mohd Khidzir and Mohamad Faiq Md Amin

Dams are constructed for many purposes such as for power generation, irrigation, water supply and flood control. However, dams can also impose risks to the public, and the…

Abstract

Dams are constructed for many purposes such as for power generation, irrigation, water supply and flood control. However, dams can also impose risks to the public, and the situation could be disastrous if dam failure occurred. The study area, Bertam Valley, is located downstream of hydroelectric dam known as Sultan Abu Bakar Dam, Cameron Highlands. The key objectives of the study are to determine the potential risk area at downstream and to assess the flooding impact on damage to buildings and infrastructures due to dam break event. ArcGIS application and output from two-dimensional flood modelling have been used as an integrated approach to analyse the impact due to dam break flood, by creating flood severity grid analysis. The result obtained shows that the estimated inundated area is about 0.28 km2, and almost 197 buildings are potentially affected. Results from this study show that in the event of dam break, the huge volume of impounding water will pound to the downstream areas, threatening the populations, and environment along its path. The finding is useful to assist the local authorities and emergency responders in formulating an emergency procedure to save the people during an emergency.

Details

Water Management and Sustainability in Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-114-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 18 June 2020

Chhatradhar Das and Raunak Das

Large dams have played a key role in the economic development of a country. They serve a variety of purposes, including electricity generation, flood control and…

Abstract

Large dams have played a key role in the economic development of a country. They serve a variety of purposes, including electricity generation, flood control and irrigation. Nevertheless, development-induced forced migration of human population for the construction of Tehri Dam in Old Tehri of Garhwal–Himalayan region of Uttarakhand has invited lot of controversy in the recent past. A new city has been designed and presented by the government as a solution for the new settlement of migrated people. A large dam has enormous consequences for people's lives and livelihoods. Tehri Dam transforms landscapes of the region greatly, creates risks of irreversible impacts including controversial issues such as displacement and resettlement and also alters the natural functioning of the entire ecosystem. As a consequence of ecological disruption, a large number of human populations lost their migratory routes and considered as ecological refugees in their new habitat. The present study aims to understand how the forced migration has changed people's daily lives in social, cultural, religious and economic aspects. People's perceptions were discerned through participatory discussions. The field work has been carried out through direct communion with the villagers to explore how the government has reacted to the voices of the resettled citizens and how the development process has affected traditional livelihoods of the rural communities.

Details

Refugee Crises and Third-World Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-191-2

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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2022

Thu Trang Thi Ngo, Hong Quan Nguyen, Timothy Gorman, Quang Ngo Xuan, Phuong Lan Thi Ngo and Ann Vanreusel

Drought and salinity intrusion aggravated by climate change threaten agricultural livelihoods in Viet Nan's Mekong Delta. In response, authorities have built water…

Abstract

Purpose

Drought and salinity intrusion aggravated by climate change threaten agricultural livelihoods in Viet Nan's Mekong Delta. In response, authorities have built water management infrastructure for irrigation and salinity protection. This study assessed the impact of one such project, the Ba Lai dam in Ben Tre province, on the livelihoods of aquaculture farmers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework to assess the impact of the Ba Lai dam on the livelihood capitals of 18 farming households in four communes, located both upstream and downstream of the dam.

Findings

The authors find that, apart from some positive effects, the dam has also brought negative environmental consequences, such as increased water pollution. The authors also find that farmers have responded to the changes by adapting their livelihood practices.

Research limitations/implications

The samples were relatively small, encompassing four communes in Ben Tre province. On the other hand, this case study is instructive to the many ongoing infrastructure projects in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta.

Social implications

The project have caused an increase in water-related social conflict.

Originality/value

The case of the Ba Lai dam provides a cautionary example for infrastructure-based water management plans, both in Viet Nam and more broadly. The study suggests the need to strengthen community participation and prioritize impacts of farmers' capital assets when constructing water management infrastructure for climate change adaptation.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Book part
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Louis P. Cain and Brooks A. Kaiser

At the beginning of the 20th century, three intertwined ambitions drove federal legislation over wildlife and biodiversity: establishment of multiple-use federal lands…

Abstract

At the beginning of the 20th century, three intertwined ambitions drove federal legislation over wildlife and biodiversity: establishment of multiple-use federal lands, the economic development of natural resources, and the maintenance of option values. We examine this federal intervention in natural resource use by analyzing roll call votes over the past century with a Random Utility Model (Manski, 1977) and conclude that economics mattered. So did ideology, but not uniformly. After World War II, the pro-environment vote which had been conservative shifted to being liberal. All these votes involved decisions regarding public land that reallocated the returns to users by changing the asset’s physical character or its usage rights. We suggest that long-term consequences affecting current resource allocations arose from disparities between broadly dispersed benefits and locally concentrated socioeconomic and geophysical (spatial) costs. We show that a primary intent of public land management has become to preserve multiple-use option values and identify important factors in computing those option values. We do this by demonstrating how the willingness to forego current benefits for future ones depends on the community’s resource endowments. These endowments are defined not only in terms of users’ current wealth accumulation but also from their expected ability to extract utility from natural resources over time.

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Farid Terbouche, Ali Hamza and Smail Gabi

The purpose of this paper is the analysis of the dissipation of pore water pressures in the core of an earth dam, under the effect of water level fluctuations in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the analysis of the dissipation of pore water pressures in the core of an earth dam, under the effect of water level fluctuations in the reservoir under operating conditions, taking into account the partial emptying and filling.

Design/methodology/approach

The Taksebt Dam, Tizi-Ouzou, Algeria was chosen as a case study, using a two-dimensional transient finite element numerical model. The GeoStudio calculation software is used through the SEEP/W. The latter takes into account the flow in the saturated and unsaturated zone, the formulation of SEEP/W allows the analysis of the dissipation of pore water pressures in the dyke. Starting from the maximum level of the reservoir, at least one cycle of partial emptying-filling was modelled over an eight-year operating period from 2011 to 2019. The input variables were the water level variation curve, material properties and boundary conditions.

Findings

It can be concluded that the numerical results obtained from the simulation model on the different points studied, namely, the pore water pressures are satisfactory as long as they are close to those recorded in the field by the pore pressure cells with an average error not exceeding 10% except for some measurements where the error is 20%. When the water level in the reservoir varies, the pore water pressures vary and their behaviour follows these fluctuations. Some points in the dam are affected by negative pore water pressures. No abnormal situations have been detected pore water pressures.

Originality/value

The numerical results of the simulation are analysed and validated against actual pore pressure cell measurements under operating conditions.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Steve Kwok-Leung Chan

This paper aims to study dams on transboundary rivers. In this study, the case of the Nu–Salween–Thanlwin River is reviewed. This study is an attempt toward developing a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study dams on transboundary rivers. In this study, the case of the Nu–Salween–Thanlwin River is reviewed. This study is an attempt toward developing a conceptual model to explain the unequal hydropower exchange of hydropower dams on transboundary rivers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews big dam project plans on the Salween–Thanlwin River near the Myanmar–Thailand border from the perspective of critical hydropolitics. The evidence is drawn from an extensive review of academic literature, reports, newspapers and websites on this topic. Cascao and Zeitoun’s (2010) four pillars of power, namely, geographical, material, bargaining and ideational power, are reviewed in the case of the Salween–Thanlwin River and its riparian states.

Findings

On the basis of a realist discourse, power relationships between dams and their socio-environmental effects are discussed from the perspective of critical hydropolitics. Multiple levels of power asymmetry regarding geographical, material, bargaining and ideational power are observed. The powerful states are high electricity consumers and importers. They invest in hydroelectric dams of adjacent developing states and buy back most of the electricity generated to fuel their industrialization and urbanization. Weak states generally do not have high bargaining power. They depend on the investment of high material power states for domestic and economic development and gain from the export of electricity. However, the externalities of hydropower dams are transferred to these weak states. This contributes to an unequal hydropower exchange model.

Practical implications

The model provides an analytical framework for hydropower dam projects through which comprehensive and multidimensional views are extracted. Academia, policymakers, private developers, international development agencies and nongovernment organizations will have a better understanding of hydropower dam projects and the interactions among riparian states.

Originality/value

This conceptual model stems from Cascao and Zeitoun’s (2010) four pillars of power – geographical, material, bargaining and ideational power. The author limits the framework to hydroelectric dams in transboundary rivers. The powerful states are high electricity consumers and importers that dominate the dam development projects and exchange process.

Details

International Journal of Development Issues, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1446-8956

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Siqi Dou, Junjie Li and Fei Kang

Parameter identification is an important issue in structural health monitoring and damage identification for concrete dams. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a…

Abstract

Purpose

Parameter identification is an important issue in structural health monitoring and damage identification for concrete dams. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel adaptive fireworks algorithm (AFWA) into inverse analysis of parameter identification.

Design/methodology/approach

Swarm intelligence algorithms and finite element analysis are integrated to identify parameters of hydraulic structures. Three swarm intelligence algorithms: AFWA, standard particle swarm optimization (SPSO) and artificial bee colony algorithm (ABC) are adopted to make a comparative study. These algorithms are introduced briefly and then tested by four standard benchmark functions. Inverse analysis methods based on AFWA, SPSO and ABC are adopted to identify Young’s modulus of a concrete gravity dam and a concrete arch dam.

Findings

Numerical results show that swarm intelligence algorithms are powerful tools for parameter identification of concrete structures. The proposed AFWA-based inverse analysis algorithm for concrete dams is promising in terms of accuracy and efficiency.

Originality/value

Fireworks algorithm is applied for inverse analysis of hydraulic structures for the first time, and the problem of parameter selection in AFWA is studied.

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Hui Chen and Donghai Liu

The purpose of this study is to develop a stochastic finite element method (FEM) to solve the calculation precision deficiency caused by spatial variability of dam

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a stochastic finite element method (FEM) to solve the calculation precision deficiency caused by spatial variability of dam compaction quality.

Design/methodology/approach

The Choleski decomposition method was applied to generate constraint random field of porosity. Large-scale laboratory triaxial tests were conducted to determine the quantitative relationship between the dam compaction quality and Duncan–Chang constitutive model parameters. Based on this developed relationship, the constraint random fields of the mechanical parameters were generated. The stochastic FEM could be conducted.

Findings

When the fully random field was simulated without the restriction effect of experimental data on test pits, the spatial variabilities of both displacement and stress results were all overestimated; however, when the stochastic FEM was performed disregarding the correlation between mechanical parameters, the variabilities of vertical displacement and stress results were underestimated and variation pattern for horizontal displacement also changed. In addition, the method could produce results that are closer to the actual situation.

Practical implications

Although only concrete-faced rockfill dam was tested in the numerical examples, the proposed method is applicable for arbitrary types of rockfill dams.

Originality/value

The value of this study is that the proposed method allowed for the spatial variability of constitutive model parameters and that the applicability was confirmed by the actual project.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 36 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Govindasamy Agoramoorthy and Minna J Hsu

This study aims to assess how small check dams built across rivers in India’s drylands can revitalize rivers during dry season and mitigate local climate change…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess how small check dams built across rivers in India’s drylands can revitalize rivers during dry season and mitigate local climate change consequences. The surface- and groundwater resources are increasingly under pressure throughout India. The imminent climate change consequences will further aggravate the crisis and this paper has addressed this difficult issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was conducted in India’s dryland districts, namely, Dahod in Gujarat and Jhalawar and Banswara in Rajasthan state, to assess the impacts of small dams. Data on dams, sustainability, groundwater levels and benefits to farmers were systematically collected to analyze advantages offered by check dams with reference to climate change mitigation.

Findings

The study shows that 356 check dams built during 1990-2012 across the tribal drylands of India, with a cost of USD 17 million, benefited over one million people from farming communities. The dams also increased groundwater levels in villages, revived rivers during dry season and increased forest growth along rivers, ultimately mitigating local climate change-imposed negative consequences.

Research limitations/implications

Data on small dams are limited in India, as public have no access to such data because the work is done mainly by local contractors.

Practical implications

The check dams, the role of which is highlighted here, are simple, eco-friendly and cost-effective. If it is adopted across the vast drylands of India and elsewhere, it has the potential to increase agricultural output; guarantee food security; enhance groundwater resources; and, above all, mitigate local climate change consequences.

Social implications

If check dams are built in large numbers across India, it has the potential to increase agricultural output; guarantee food security; enhance groundwater resources; and, above all, mitigate climate change.

Originality/value

The highlighted results and discussion will guide scientists, politicians and policymakers to make informed decisions to combat India

s future climate change consequences.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

Keywords

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