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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Borut Milfelner, Tanja Vidergar Kikel, Damijan Mumel and Aleksandra Pisnik

The purpose of this paper is to measure attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services among women and to determine the potential segments of women according to their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services among women and to determine the potential segments of women according to their attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services and discover the main differences among them.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was implemented on a sample of 258 women in Slovenia. A quota sample was chosen for this research following the age characteristics of the Slovenian female population. The data collection method used was personal interviews. Convergent validity for the attitudes towards cosmetic surgery services was assessed with exploratory factor analysis. The segmentation analysis procedure was implemented in two phases. First, hierarchical clustering with Ward’s method was deployed, and in the second step K-means cluster analysis was used.

Findings

The results show that four clusters were clearly distinctive according to three dimensions, namely, intrapersonal, social and consider component. In further analysis, four segments of women were analysed regarding the fear of ageing, the importance of appearance, body image and self-esteem. Results show that all four segments are unique and distinguish one from another.

Practical implications

Through segmentation analysis, authors of this study indicate two segments (target groups) that are possibly interesting for providers of cosmetic services. Marketing communication activities should mainly be focussed on the woman’s appearance.

Originality/value

Based on a theoretical hypothesis and use a quantitative method, the aim of this paper is to provide a deeper analysis and understanding of attitudes and views of different woman profile regarding cosmetic surgeries. It presents a more structured view on differences that exist among segments of female consumers while also adding new insights into the factors that influence attitudes towards cosmetic procedures.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Boris Snoj, Aleksandra Pisnik Korda and Damijan Mumel

Perceived value is an extremely important concept in marketing and many authors have dealt with it in recent years. In Slovenia perceived value of product is a rather…

22244

Abstract

Perceived value is an extremely important concept in marketing and many authors have dealt with it in recent years. In Slovenia perceived value of product is a rather neglected aspect of the research. Moreover, nobody has empirically researched the impact of individual factors on perceived value of a product. The researched target group was students – the fastest growing segment among the users of mobile phones in Slovenia. In their research the authors focused on two of the perceived value impact factors: perceived product quality and perceived risk. Based on literature and our own findings, their main researched objective was to design the model of relationships among perceived value, perceived quality and perceived risk. After the model had been tested with the method of structural equation modeling (LISREL 8.0), the authors found that statistically significant relationships (positive and negative, direct and indirect) among the concepts researched exist.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Damijan Mumel and Jadranka Prodnik

The purpose of this research was to test the statement. “All older people are the same” and answer the question if professional and social activity play an important role…

4553

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research was to test the statement. “All older people are the same” and answer the question if professional and social activity play an important role in dividing the respondents into different segments in the field of apparel shopping. We examined seven aspects of apparel consumer behaviour: where do our respondents buy apparel and how often in each retail place, do they like shopping, how often they buy apparel, how much they spend, who/what influence them to buy, who/how influence on their clothing style and other statements about consumer behaviour related with apparel.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the results of 271 older consumers of apparel through multiplicity sample were collected. Then an a priori segmentation based on social and professional activity was conducted.

Findings

Based on the survey, it can be concluded that it is not true that “all older people are the same”, as far, as the apparel business is concerned. The population observed is not homogeneous, although the differences are not so obvious and numerous as one could expect.

Research limitations/implications

This paper demonstrates a simple a priori segmentation based on professional and social activities of respondents. In further research it is inevitably to compare results with a posteriori segmentation based on cluster analysis or discriminant analysis.

Practical implications

The results are useful for product, place, price, and promotion management and through this for planning differential marketing mixes for separate older consumer segments.

Originality/value

The value of this article is to extend our knowledge in the field of apparel behaviour of older consumers, and to demonstrate how useful could be just two simple questions (about professional and social activities) in differentiating older consumers regarding apparel behaviour.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

George Siomkos, Amalia Triantafillidou, Aikaterini Vassilikopoulou and Ioannis Tsiamis

Product‐harm crises have become an almost familiar phenomenon in today's business environment as technology becomes more vulnerable. Even if a product‐harm crisis is…

3690

Abstract

Purpose

Product‐harm crises have become an almost familiar phenomenon in today's business environment as technology becomes more vulnerable. Even if a product‐harm crisis is associated with the company that manufactured the defective product, the entire industry may be affected. Not only consumers of the affected company, but also consumers of competitors are affected by the crisis. The paper seeks to deal mainly with the situation of competitors and examines the potential opportunities and threats that may arise when another company in the same industry faces a product‐harm crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

For the purposes of this paper, an experiment was conducted that relied on four important influential factors of crisis management (i.e. corporate reputation, crisis scope, external effects, and organisational responses). The crisis was described through a hypothetical scenario. Consumer attitudes towards competitive products were used to determine impending prospects and threats.

Findings

The paper's results demonstrate that consumers are very receptive in buying competitor brands, especially when the extent of the crisis was medium or high and the company involved in the crisis had shown low levels of social responsibility.

Originality/value

Previous research studies on crisis management mainly focus on the affected company and how it confronted the crisis. The paper approaches crisis management from the competitor's perspective. Because a crisis may influence the entire sector, adequate preparation and effective crisis management skills are essential assets for competitors.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2008

Damijan Prosenak, Matjaž Mulej and Boris Snoj

The paper aims to answer the following questions. Is marketing requisitely holistic? Marketing serves managers, governors, owners and employees as well as customers…

3222

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to answer the following questions. Is marketing requisitely holistic? Marketing serves managers, governors, owners and employees as well as customers, suppliers and other stakeholders with its activities in order to help company increase well‐being of stakeholders. What about the broader society's well‐being and future? What will follow, once the innovative‐society phase of socio‐economic development creates affluence, which diminishes human ambition to work in order to have? Social responsibility might be the next step in achieving success.

Design/methodology/approach

There are new forms of marketing (e.g. societal marketing; relationship marketing; cause‐related marketing; and green marketing) that could help humans accomplishing this task, to some extent. Marketing will have to detect, elaborate and disseminate new data, along with using them for its action; the paper does not tackle the latter, but marketing taking into account the social responsibility of the company in order to help companies.

Findings

Companies will namely need more/requisitely holistic bases to develop innovative products, acceptable with social responsibility. Experience says that ethnographers, anthropologists, and other social scientists are becoming necessary in the “open innovation” model and the extremely demanding market of the affluent and nearly affluent society. So is a more systemic/holistic thinking and action of companies, including their marketing.

Originality/value

The paper suggests how marketing must adapt to meet new challenges.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 37 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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