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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Debra Hiom, Dom Fripp, Stephen Gray, Kellie Snow and Damian Steer

The purpose of this paper is to chart the development of research data management services within the University of Bristol, from the initial Jisc-funded project, through…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to chart the development of research data management services within the University of Bristol, from the initial Jisc-funded project, through to pilot service and planned core funding of the service.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a case study of the approach of the University of Bristol Library service to develop a sustainable Research Data Service.

Findings

It outlines the services developed during the project and pilot phases of the service. In particular it focuses on the sustainability planning to ensure that research data management is embedded as a core university service.

Originality/value

The case study provides practical advice and valuable insights into the issues and experiences of ensuring that research data management is properly valued and supported within universities.

Details

Program: electronic library and information systems, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Damian Elgin Maclean Milton and Nicola Martin

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603

Abstract

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Nicola Martin, Damian Elgin Maclean Milton, Tara Sims, Gemma Dawkins, Simon Baron-Cohen and Richard Mills

The Research Autism Cygnet Mentoring project was a two-year pilot study, completed in 2016, which aimed to develop, trial and evaluate a mentoring scheme designed with…

Abstract

Purpose

The Research Autism Cygnet Mentoring project was a two-year pilot study, completed in 2016, which aimed to develop, trial and evaluate a mentoring scheme designed with input from autistic people, their families and supporters. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The mentoring scheme involved 12 matched pairs (mentor/mentee) meeting once per week for one hour, over a six-month period. All mentors attended a training day, led by the principles of personal construct theory and an emancipatory research ethos. The project and training involved significant involvement of autistic people in both its design and delivery.

Findings

Participants on the autism spectrum found their mentoring experience very helpful in enabling them to progress towards self-identified goals, and mentees felt empowered by the person-centred ethos and the methods employed on the project. However, a number of aspects of the mentoring project have been identified that require further investigation, including: caution over offering mentoring without formal structures, boundary setting, supervision, flexibility and the matching of mentees with mentors.

Originality/value

The project has highlighted the potential benefits of time-limited goal-orientated mentoring and the negligible evidence base underpinning current mentoring practice with adults on the autism spectrum. In order for the project to realise its emancipatory aim, there is a need for a large-scale quantitative study and a health-economics analysis to provide the necessary evidence base for mentoring to be recommended as a cost-effective intervention with clear benefits for individual wellbeing.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Jo Hanisch, Theerasak Thanasankit and Brian Corbitt

Requirements engineering is a crucial phase in software development. Software development in a virtual domain adds another dimension to the process of requirements…

Abstract

Requirements engineering is a crucial phase in software development. Software development in a virtual domain adds another dimension to the process of requirements engineering. There has been growing interest in virtual teams, and more specifically in virtual software development. While structured software development methods are the obvious first choice for project managers to ensure a virtual software development team remains on track, the social and cultural aspects of requirements engineering cannot be ignored. These social aspects are especially important across different cultures, and have been shown to affect the success of an information system. The discussion in this paper is centred around the requirements engineering processes of a virtual team in a Thai Software House. This paper explains the issues and challenges of requirements engineering in a virtual domain from a social and cultural perspective. Project managers need to encourage a balance between structured methods and social aspects in requirements engineering for virtual team members. Cultural and social aspects influence the relationship between the virtual team and the client.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Damian Gordon, Ioannis Stavrakakis, J. Paul Gibson, Brendan Tierney, Anna Becevel, Andrea Curley, Michael Collins, William O’Mahony and Dympna O’Sullivan

Computing ethics represents a long established, yet rapidly evolving, discipline that grows in complexity and scope on a near-daily basis. Therefore, to help understand…

Abstract

Purpose

Computing ethics represents a long established, yet rapidly evolving, discipline that grows in complexity and scope on a near-daily basis. Therefore, to help understand some of that scope it is essential to incorporate a range of perspectives, from a range of stakeholders, on current and emerging ethical challenges associated with computer technology. This study aims to achieve this by using, a three-pronged, stakeholder analysis of Computer Science academics, ICT industry professionals, and citizen groups was undertaken to explore what they consider to be crucial computing ethics concerns. The overlap between these stakeholder groups are explored, as well as whether their concerns are reflected in the existing literature.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was performed using focus groups, and the data was analysed using a thematic analysis. The data was also analysed to determine if there were overlaps between the literature and the stakeholders’ concerns and attitudes towards computing ethics.

Findings

The results of the focus group analysis show a mixture of overlapping concerns between the different groups, as well as some concerns that are unique to each of the specific groups. All groups stressed the importance of data as a key topic in computing ethics. This includes concerns around the accuracy, completeness and representativeness of data sets used to develop computing applications. Academics were concerned with the best ways to teach computing ethics to university students. Industry professionals believed that a lack of diversity in software teams resulted in important questions not being asked during design and development. Citizens discussed at length the negative and unexpected impacts of social media applications. These are all topics that have gained broad coverage in the literature.

Social implications

In recent years, the impact of ICT on society and the environment at large has grown tremendously. From this fast-paced growth, a myriad of ethical concerns have arisen. The analysis aims to shed light on what a diverse group of stakeholders consider the most important social impacts of technology and whether these concerns are reflected in the literature on computing ethics. The outcomes of this analysis will form the basis for new teaching content that will be developed in future to help illuminate and address these concerns.

Originality/value

The multi-stakeholder analysis provides individual and differing perspectives on the issues related to the rapidly evolving discipline of computing ethics.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2020

Paweł Rzucidło, Tomasz Rogalski, Grzegorz Jaromi, Damian Kordos, Piotr Szczerba and Andrzej Paw

The purpose of this paper is to describe simulation research carried out for the needs of multi-sensor anti-collision system for light aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles.

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86

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe simulation research carried out for the needs of multi-sensor anti-collision system for light aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an analysis related to the practical possibilities of detecting intruders in the air space with the use of optoelectronic sensors. The theoretical part determines the influence of the angle of view, distance from the intruder and the resolution of the camera on the ability to detect objects with different linear dimensions. It has been assumed that the detection will be effective for objects represented by at least four pixels (arranged in a line) on the sensor matrix. In the main part devoted to simulation studies, the theoretical data was compared to the obtained intruders’ images. The verified simulation environment was then applied to the image processing algorithms developed for the anti-collision system.

Findings

A simulation environment was obtained enabling reliable tests of the anti-collision system using optoelectronic sensors.

Practical implications

The integration of unmanned aircraft operations in civil airspace is a serious problem on a global scale. Equipping aircraft with autonomous anti-collision systems can help solve key problems. The use of simulation techniques in the process of testing anti-collision systems allows the implementation of test scenarios that may be burdened with too much risk in real flights.

Social implications

This paper aims for possible improvement of safety in light-sport aviation.

Originality/value

This paper conducts verification of classic flight simulator software suitability for carrying out anti-collision systems tests and development of a flight simulator platform dedicated to such tests.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 92 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 November 2020

Malcolm Tight

This chapter offers a systematic review of research into quality assurance and quality management in higher education. It begins by considering quality as theory and…

Abstract

This chapter offers a systematic review of research into quality assurance and quality management in higher education. It begins by considering quality as theory and discusses the methodology applied. The origin and meaning of the terms quality assurance and quality management, as they are used in higher education, and their application and practice, are then discussed. The issues and critiques that have been raised concerning quality assurance and management are identified, before some conclusions are reached.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-321-2

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

B.H. Rudall and C.J.H. Mann

This paper aims to review current research and developments with particular reference to new research and development initiatives.

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1554

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review current research and developments with particular reference to new research and development initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

A general review and survey of selected research and development topics is given, and some of the new challenges and applications of future technologies are considered.

Findings

The paper illustrates the multi‐ and trans‐disciplinary natures of studies in cybernetics, systems and management science, with a view to further research and development activity.

Practical implications

The choice of reviews provides an awareness of current trends in these areas of endeavour.

Originality/value

The reviews are selected from a global database and give a studied assessment of current research and development initiatives.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

John Currie

The aim of the paper is to assess the commissioning systems in place for the commissioning of local dual diagnosis interventions and to make recommendations for the…

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178

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to assess the commissioning systems in place for the commissioning of local dual diagnosis interventions and to make recommendations for the establishment of innovative practice beacon sites. This involves focussing on five areas in the North West: Cumbria, Warrington, Manchester, Lancashire and Bolton.

Design/methodology/approach

A diagnostic process was undertaken to determine the characteristics of each area via the filling in of diagnostic tools by local commissioners; interviews; and a consultation event.

Findings

The review found that despite the lack of updated policy and guidance around the commissioning of dual diagnosis interventions, there are good examples of innovative practice in the North West. However, it must be noted that these interventions have not been the subject of formal evaluation and this is a recommendation of this review.

Originality/value

This is the first review of its kind into the commissioning of dual diagnosis in this region with the added legacy value of the establishment of the beacon sites, designed to develop and disseminate examples of innovative practice in commissioning dual diagnosis interventions.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2015

Dirk Lindebaum

The processes that underlie ability emotional intelligence (EI) are barely understood, despite decades of management research. Furthermore, the outcomes of these processes…

Abstract

The processes that underlie ability emotional intelligence (EI) are barely understood, despite decades of management research. Furthermore, the outcomes of these processes have been narrowly and prescriptively defined. To address this deficiency, I conducted a phenomenological study (n = 26). Findings from a public sector sample suggest that the underlying emotional processes of meaningful life events are – at least for now – better defined through the construct of emotion regulation. While it is part of the ability EI model, the emotional processing that occurs prior to emotion regulation being initiated is likely to be less consistent with current EI theory. Likewise, these processes lead to outcomes considerably more nuanced than currently appreciated in the EI literature. Consequently, what started as a gap-filling approach to research eventually turned into a problematization of what scholars seem to know about EI. I outline the theoretical and practical implications of this study for management, and offer suggestions for future research.

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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