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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Charlie Brooker, Damian Mitchell and Alison Wheeler

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Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

John Currie

The aim of the paper is to assess the commissioning systems in place for the commissioning of local dual diagnosis interventions and to make recommendations for the…

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178

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to assess the commissioning systems in place for the commissioning of local dual diagnosis interventions and to make recommendations for the establishment of innovative practice beacon sites. This involves focussing on five areas in the North West: Cumbria, Warrington, Manchester, Lancashire and Bolton.

Design/methodology/approach

A diagnostic process was undertaken to determine the characteristics of each area via the filling in of diagnostic tools by local commissioners; interviews; and a consultation event.

Findings

The review found that despite the lack of updated policy and guidance around the commissioning of dual diagnosis interventions, there are good examples of innovative practice in the North West. However, it must be noted that these interventions have not been the subject of formal evaluation and this is a recommendation of this review.

Originality/value

This is the first review of its kind into the commissioning of dual diagnosis in this region with the added legacy value of the establishment of the beacon sites, designed to develop and disseminate examples of innovative practice in commissioning dual diagnosis interventions.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Karen Tocque, John Currie, Elizabeth Hughes and Charlie Brooker

The North of England characteristically has higher levels of alcohol‐related harm and higher levels of mental illness compared with the South. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

The North of England characteristically has higher levels of alcohol‐related harm and higher levels of mental illness compared with the South. The purpose of this paper is to present observations on the use of services by people who have both alcohol and mental health problems to explore the equality and economic impact of services.

Design/methodology/approach

Inpatient hospital datasets as well as other NHS service datasets were examined to gather intelligence on alcohol and co‐occurring mental and behavioural disorders.

Findings

The study finds that there are high levels of dual diagnosis (DD) of alcohol and mental health in the North West with significantly higher rates in the more socially deprived areas and gap in access to services.

Research limitations/implications

These health inequalities in relation to DD can only be demonstrated robustly for hospital inpatient admissions because other datasets currently provide intelligence only at larger geographies – such as Primary Care Trust – or by service provider.

Practical implications

Population surveys are useful to generate estimates of the prevalence of mental health issues in alcohol users which then reveal that there are greater inequalities in access to services in more deprived populations. Such valuable intelligence should be generated at the local level so that the most appropriate and the most cost effective services can be commissioned for the local population.

Originality/value

This is the first time that the economic cost of DD in the various services has been estimated.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Elizabeth Hughes

The purpose of this paper is to obtain an insight into how mental health and alcohol services are responding to people presenting with alcohol and mental health problems…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to obtain an insight into how mental health and alcohol services are responding to people presenting with alcohol and mental health problems, as a part of a wider North West Alcohol and Mental Health Project commissioned by Drink Wise North West and Alcohol Improvement Programme (Department of Health).

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic survey was sent to managers and clinical leads in mental health and alcohol services across the North West region of England.

Findings

The paper found a variation in definitions of dual diagnosis and that not all areas had a strategy in place. NHS mental health and alcohol services seemed to offer a wider range of treatment options; but, this reflects the more complex nature of the service users. Workforce issues were identified as an important issue. Barriers to accessing effective care included lack of agreements between local agencies, and solutions included greater partnership working.

Research limitations/implications

This was a small sample of respondents, accessed opportunistically and, therefore, unlikely to be a true representation of all services in the North West of England.

Originality/value

Whilst limited in scope, this survey highlights that even after ten years of service development related to alcohol and mental health, there are still significant barriers to effective care and that more workforce development and multi‐agency collaboration is required.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2011

Alison Summers and Chinar Goel

This paper seeks to outline the nature of early intervention (EI) services in psychosis and to discuss substance use in clients in this setting. It considers ways of…

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737

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to outline the nature of early intervention (EI) services in psychosis and to discuss substance use in clients in this setting. It considers ways of working with EI clients where substance use is an issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by outlining the nature of EI services and early psychosis, then goes on to discuss the impact and management of substance use in this setting.

Findings

The authors argue that the El approach may be very appropriate for this subset of clients.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the issues of treatment of dual diagnosis within a specialised area of mental service provision. EI services for psychosis aim to provide early detection and treatment of psychosis, particularly through increased emphasis on psychosocial interventions.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Sergio Henrique Rocha Franco

The purpose of this paper is to indicate how place making and belonging are still largely governed by race in Brazil and South Africa. As such, it engages with debates…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to indicate how place making and belonging are still largely governed by race in Brazil and South Africa. As such, it engages with debates about the postracial informed by the study of two urban settings that are discernible by their relationship with race issues: Rio de Janeiro’s favelas and Johannesburg’s townships.

Design/methodology/approach

The study provides a brief account of post-racial discourses in each country: Brazilian racial democracy and South Africa’s self-imagination as rainbow nation. Subsequently, these two major national self-understandings are probed using data gathered in the fieldwork (participant observation and in-depth interviews) carried out in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas and Johannesburg’s townships between 2013 and 2015.

Findings

The main accomplishment of the study is to approach debates about senses of place, understood here as place making and belonging, from the everyday experiences of favela and township inhabitants. The study suggests discrepancies between the racialized senses of place in Brazilian and South African urban milieus and any sort of post-racial rhetoric. Despite the existence of norms and institutions promoting equal rights of citizenship in Brazil and South Africa, place making is still largely encumbered by the legacy of racial domination in both countries.

Originality/value

By adding new evidence to the research on everyday racism, the study explores the mutual influences between senses of place and the persistent patterns of racial segregation in two urban contexts of the global South. Beyond this, it offers a comparative approach that connects micro-level social dynamics and macro-level discourses.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 39 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 13 October 2016

Yipeng Liu and Andrew Isaak

As the developing nations grow and experience rapid institutional transformation, research has begun to investigate the roles of culture, cognition and institutional…

Abstract

As the developing nations grow and experience rapid institutional transformation, research has begun to investigate the roles of culture, cognition and institutional context on entrepreneurship and innovation. This chapter aims to advance the entrepreneurial cognition literature by juxtaposing entrepreneurial effectuation, domain-specific expertise and ambiguity. By conducting a qualitative study of Chinese high-tech domestic and returnee entrepreneurs, the authors propose a spectrum between causation and effectuation and argue that the entrepreneur’s perceived level of ambiguity may better explain differing logic orientations among entrepreneurs, contributing to our understanding of entrepreneurial cognition. The authors theorize that (1) individual actors and the level of institutional development jointly comprise the entrepreneur’s logic orientation; (2) the level of perceived ambiguity mediates the strategy adopted by high-tech entrepreneurs; (3) the entrepreneur’s logic orientation can be regarded as a continual spectrum from effectuation to causation. Finally, the logic orientation concept is applied to the context of cross-border mergers and acquisitions (M&A) from a process perspective and the implications and fit of logic orientation with the stages of cross-border M&A are discussed.

Details

Mergers and Acquisitions, Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-371-9

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Book part
Publication date: 2 January 2019

Abstract

Details

Language, Teaching, and Pedagogy for Refugee Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-799-7

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Damian Tambini and Sharif Labo

Digital intermediaries such as Google and Facebook are seen as the new powerbrokers in online news, controlling access to consumers and with the potential even to suppress…

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1579

Abstract

Purpose

Digital intermediaries such as Google and Facebook are seen as the new powerbrokers in online news, controlling access to consumers and with the potential even to suppress and target messages to individuals. Academics, publishers and policymakers have raised concerns about the implications of this new power, from the impact on media plurality to implications for democratic discourse, freedom of speech and control over public opinion formation. After reviewing academic literature that has raised this concern and public policy addressing it, this paper aims to examine the empirical foundations for these claims. Through secondary analysis of industry data on referrals of online news traffic, the authors find that intermediaries do have the potential to exert significant influence over distribution of online news. The authors however find that not all news that is filtered through intermediary services is subject to the same shaping and editorial forces, in part, because user agency is also an important factor. The role of intermediaries in news distribution is thus complex; headline numbers do not translate automatically into influence due to the complex interplay and exchange between user agency and the editorial influence of intermediaries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based mainly on a secondary analysis of publicly available data on news referrals, and some data provided by news publishers along with re-analysis of regulatory data from Ofcom and previously unpublished data from the BBC and SimilarWeb. These data sources are combined for the first time to investigate claims regarding the current controversy about media plurality, algorithmic power and transparency.

Findings

The paper finds that evidence that intermediaries wield concentrated editorial power is mixed. While other, non-intermediated news distribution platforms such as TV and the press remain highly important, online is heading towards being the most important distribution platform, particularly for younger demographics. The authors found that intermediaries such as search and social control access to a significant proportion of online news content. Not all use of intermediaries is indicative of online gatekeeping however. User agency also determines how content is prioritised and thus consumed. The news consumed is therefore a product of a complex interplay between user agency and intermediary influence. In contrast to traditional discussions of media power and its regulation (for example the notion of mass media plurality); it is thus not possible to make inferences on influence simply by noting the market share of intermediaries. The role of intermediaries is much more subtle and opaque.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is mainly based on publicly available data. It is crucial to find out what is possible with such data as regulators with responsibility for monitoring and regulating media plurality are similarly limited to such data. The implications are that further research with a wide range of methods and data sources will be necessary to update research on media plurality and diversity.

Practical implications

The implications of these findings are that independent public authorities should have access to much more revealing data about public opinion formation processes, including referrals and other data currently held only by publishers. The three stage analytical framework will be of use to regulators and policymakers currently looking into these issues.

Social implications

Civil society and public debate about digital intermediaries is currently intensively discussed in policy debate. Taking these debates forward will depend on whether existing public policy frameworks (such as limits on news plurality) are able to accommodate the new challenges such as intermediary influence on news distribution and public opinion formation.

Originality/value

The recent special issue of INFO, including contributions from Mansell and Helberger, raised a range of similar issues with regard to media plurality and intermediaries. These papers did not seek empirically to examine in depth, using all available publicly relevant data, the implications for media pluralism and diversity in one particular media market. The paper is theoretically original, contains some previously unpublished data and an entirely new empirical and theoretical analysis. The models and tables are previously unpublished.

Details

info, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Nicola Martin, Damian Elgin Maclean Milton, Tara Sims, Gemma Dawkins, Simon Baron-Cohen and Richard Mills

The Research Autism Cygnet Mentoring project was a two-year pilot study, completed in 2016, which aimed to develop, trial and evaluate a mentoring scheme designed with…

Abstract

Purpose

The Research Autism Cygnet Mentoring project was a two-year pilot study, completed in 2016, which aimed to develop, trial and evaluate a mentoring scheme designed with input from autistic people, their families and supporters. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The mentoring scheme involved 12 matched pairs (mentor/mentee) meeting once per week for one hour, over a six-month period. All mentors attended a training day, led by the principles of personal construct theory and an emancipatory research ethos. The project and training involved significant involvement of autistic people in both its design and delivery.

Findings

Participants on the autism spectrum found their mentoring experience very helpful in enabling them to progress towards self-identified goals, and mentees felt empowered by the person-centred ethos and the methods employed on the project. However, a number of aspects of the mentoring project have been identified that require further investigation, including: caution over offering mentoring without formal structures, boundary setting, supervision, flexibility and the matching of mentees with mentors.

Originality/value

The project has highlighted the potential benefits of time-limited goal-orientated mentoring and the negligible evidence base underpinning current mentoring practice with adults on the autism spectrum. In order for the project to realise its emancipatory aim, there is a need for a large-scale quantitative study and a health-economics analysis to provide the necessary evidence base for mentoring to be recommended as a cost-effective intervention with clear benefits for individual wellbeing.

Details

Advances in Autism, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

Keywords

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