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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Shoufeng Cao, Kim Bryceson and Damian Hine

Supply chain risks (SCRs) do not work in isolation and have impact both on each member of a chain and the performance of the entire supply chain. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain risks (SCRs) do not work in isolation and have impact both on each member of a chain and the performance of the entire supply chain. The purpose of this paper is to quantitatively assess the impact of dynamic risk propagation within and between integrated firms in global fresh produce supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

A risk propagation ontology-based Bayesian network (BN) model was developed to measure dynamic SCR propagation. The proposed model was applied to a two-tier Australia-China table grape supply chain (ACTGSC) featured with an upstream Australian integrated grower and exporter and a downstream Chinese integrated importer and online retailer.

Findings

An ontology-based BN can be generated to accurately represent the risk domain of interest using the knowledge and inference capabilities inherent in a risk propagation ontology. In addition, the analyses revealed that supply discontinuity, product inconsistency and/or delivery delay originating in the upstream firm can propagate to increase the downstream firm’s customer value risk and business performance risk.

Research limitations/implications

The work was conducted in an Australian-China table grape supply chain, so results are only product chain-specific in nature. Additionally, only two state values were considered for all nodes in the model, and finally, while the proposed methodology does provide a large-scale risk network map, it may not be appropriate for a large supply chain network as it only follows the process flow of a single supply chain.

Practical implications

This study supports the backward-looking traceability of risk root causes through the ACTGSC and the forward-looking prediction of risk propagation to key risk performance measures.

Social implications

The methodology used in this paper provides an evidence-based decision-making capability as part of a system-wide risk management approach and fosters collaborative SCR management, which can yield numerous societal benefits.

Originality/value

The proposed methodology addresses the challenges in using a knowledge-based approach to develop a BN model, particularly with a large-scale model and integrates risk and performance for a holistic risk propagation assessment. The combination of modelling approaches to address the issue is unique.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Shoufeng Cao, Kim Bryceson and Damian Hine

The aim of this paper is to explore the value of collaborative risk management in a decentralised multi-tier global fresh produce supply chain.

505

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the value of collaborative risk management in a decentralised multi-tier global fresh produce supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilised a mixed methods approach. A qualitative field study was conducted to examine the need for collaborative risk management. The simulation experiments with industry datasets were conducted to assess whether risk-sharing contracts work in mitigating joint risks in parts of and across the supply chain.

Findings

The qualitative field study revealed risk propagation and the inefficiency of company-specific risk management strategies in value delivery. The simulation results indicated that risk-sharing contracts can incentivise various actors to absorb interrelated risks for value creation.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to risks relevant to supply chain processes in the Australia–China table grrape supply chain and does not consider product-related risks and the risk-taking behaviours of supply chain actors.

Practical implications

Collaborative risk management can be deployed to mitigate systematic risks that disrupt global fresh produce supply chains. The results offer evidence-based knowledge to supply chain professionals in understanding the value of collaborative risk assessment and management and provide insights on how to conduct collaborative risk management for effective risk management.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the supply chain risk management literature by new collaborative forms for effective risk management and strategic competition of “supply chain to supply chain” in multi-tier food supply chains.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Damian Hine and Dennis Howard

Life cycle models have become important in explaining the changing size structure of firms based on the carrying capacity of regions or industries. In particular, the…

1399

Abstract

Life cycle models have become important in explaining the changing size structure of firms based on the carrying capacity of regions or industries. In particular, the population ecology model predicts stages of growth, maturity and eventually decline in the number of firms in an industry. There has been criticism of such models because of their focus on external variables as pre‐determinants of the potential for enterprise development. This paper attempts to reconcile the external focus of the population ecology model with relevant internal management factors in enterprise development. A survey was conducted of Australian services exporters, and the results not only confirm the existence of four separate life cycle stages in the population ecology model, but also identify the external and internal variables that are strategically relevant at each of the stages. The findings provide potentially useful information in a range of contexts including the design of small business assistance as well a providing “guide posts” to entrepreneurs engaged in enterprise development.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Philip MacKinnon, William D. Rifkin, Damian Hine and Ross Barnard

Success in research – or ‘mastery’ as we call it – can lead to interdisciplinarity arising among the increasingly fragmented disciplines of science: researchers in…

Abstract

Success in research – or ‘mastery’ as we call it – can lead to interdisciplinarity arising among the increasingly fragmented disciplines of science: researchers in molecular biology can be assisted by advances in the physics of atomic imaging, when they become aware of a development's potential and feel motivated to take advantage of it. The unpredictability of advances in scientific research makes the location and nature of interdisciplinarity largely unpredictable. This unpredictability means that organisational structures in which scientific research takes place – and in which our students are trained – are likely to lag behind interdisciplinary synergies developing in the laboratory. The lag time suggested by our model explains the challenges faced by leaders of interdisciplinary programmes in higher education. One can conclude that opportunities for interdisciplinarity in science are held back by discipline-bound institutions.

Details

Interdisciplinary Higher Education: Perspectives and Practicalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-371-3

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Damian Charles Hine, Helge Helmersson and Jan Mattsson

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the need in biotechnology to integrate a variety of knowledge bases to build the intellectual asset base of the commercial entity…

1307

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the need in biotechnology to integrate a variety of knowledge bases to build the intellectual asset base of the commercial entity operating in the biotechnology industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based upon a single case study of a young biotechnology company, itself relying on the knowledge and expertise of four directors. To analyze the responses of the four directors to a single lead question, designed to prompt the respondents to articulate the intellectual capital they offer to the firm, this study employs a novel text analytical tool known as Perspective Text Analysis (Pertex).

Research limitations/implications

The results show the disparate nature of the individual knowledge sets in contributing to the interdisciplinary base of the firm. The combined analysis illustrates the importance of collective intellectual capital through “sustainable collaboration.”

Originality/value

This study employs a novel analytical tool to undertake an analysis of both individual intellectual capital and collective interdisciplinary contribution using data from a single question. Pertex is a valuable tool in analyzing the intentionality of a respondent by cutting through to the true essence of their response.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Damian Hine and Neal Ryan

The debate over the innovative role of small firms has largely been resolved. However, researchers have yet to establish the basis for some small firms being more…

2845

Abstract

The debate over the innovative role of small firms has largely been resolved. However, researchers have yet to establish the basis for some small firms being more innovative than others and the impact of their innovations on their industry. There is also an imperative to augment current literature on small service firms. This paper presents a study of small service exporters and differentiates between three groups based upon their innovativeness. Using analysis of variance as the analytical technique, significant differences are found between groups, indicating that the more innovative firms are of greater potential value to their industry. The findings displayed in this paper support the push for innovation strategy as a means of developing new and emerging markets by pioneering small firms.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Chris Collet, Damian Hine and Karen du Plessis

While the global education debate remains focused on graduate skills and employability, the absence of a shared language between student, academic and industry stakeholder…

10872

Abstract

Purpose

While the global education debate remains focused on graduate skills and employability, the absence of a shared language between student, academic and industry stakeholder groups means that defining industry skills requirements is both essential and difficult. The purpose of this paper is to assess graduate skills requirements in a knowledge-intensive industry from a demand perspective as distinct from a curriculum (supply) viewpoint.

Design/methodology/approach

Skills items were derived from a breadth of disciplines across academic, policy and industry literature. CEOs and senior managers in the innovation and commercialisation industry were surveyed regarding perceptions of skills in graduates and skills in demand by the firm. Two rounds of exploratory factor analyses were undertaken to examine employers’ perceptions of the skills gap.

Findings

First-order analysis resolved ten broad constructs that represent cognitive, interpersonal and intrapersonal skills domains as applied in this industry. Knowledge, leadership and interprofessional collaboration feature as prominent skills. Second-order analysis revealed employers’ perceptions of graduate skills specifically centre on organisational fit and organisational success. An over-arching theme relates to performance of the individual in organisations.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that the discourse on employability and the design of curriculum need to shift from instilling lists of skills towards enabling graduates to perform in a diversity of workplace contexts and expectations centred on organisational purpose.

Originality/value

In contrast to the heterogeneous nature of industry surveys, the authors targeted a homogenous sector that is representative of knowledge-intensive industries. This study contributes to the broader stakeholder dialogue of the value and application of graduate skills in this and other industry sectors.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Higher Education: Perspectives and Practicalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-371-3

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2010

Abstract

Details

Interdisciplinary Higher Education: Perspectives and Practicalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-371-3

Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Damian Tago, Henrik Andersson and Nicolas Treich

This study contributes to the understanding of the health effects of pesticides exposure and of how pesticides have been and should be regulated.

Abstract

Purpose

This study contributes to the understanding of the health effects of pesticides exposure and of how pesticides have been and should be regulated.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents literature reviews for the period 2000–2013 on (i) the health effects of pesticides and on (ii) preference valuation of health risks related to pesticides, as well as a discussion of the role of benefit-cost analysis applied to pesticide regulatory measures.

Findings

This study indicates that the health literature has focused on individuals with direct exposure to pesticides, i.e. farmers, while the literature on preference valuation has focused on those with indirect exposure, i.e. consumers. The discussion highlights the need to clarify the rationale for regulating pesticides, the role of risk perceptions in benefit-cost analysis, and the importance of inter-disciplinary research in this area.

Originality/value

This study relates findings of different disciplines (health, economics, public policy) regarding pesticides, and identifies gaps for future research.

Details

Preference Measurement in Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-029-2

Keywords

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