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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Dale Simpson

162

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Gary Spraakman and Julie Margret

Sir George Simpson, the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) from 1821 to his death in 1860, was the subject of numerous biographical works that described various…

679

Abstract

Purpose

Sir George Simpson, the Governor of the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) from 1821 to his death in 1860, was the subject of numerous biographical works that described various facets of the man including his managerial abilities, literary prowess, physical stamina, abundant energy, extensive art collection and ethnological specimens. Two related aspects of his outstanding management style have been overlooked: the genesis of his management style and where it can be placed in the evolution of management practices during the 19th century.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data from the Hudson's Bay Company archives plus secondary sources.

Findings

Simpson's management abilities came from his grammar school education and his apprenticeship to a counting house. More importantly, it can be attributed to his association with his mentor Andrew Wedderburn, his dedication to the HBC, and his high level of physical and intellectual energy. His information intensive management style was also a significant precursor to systematic management, which occurred later in the 19th century.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine other examples of the evolution of management during the 19th century, particularly the transition from sub‐unit accountability to systematic management.

Originality/value

The paper emphasizes the importance of managers in making management systems work.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2020

Theodore T. Y. Chen, Qiang Zhou, Hui Fang and Yanling Wang

The Braun and Simpson’s (2004) study indicates that the Pause method is an effective teaching approach for auditing based on four sets of hypotheses in developing…

Abstract

The Braun and Simpson’s (2004) study indicates that the Pause method is an effective teaching approach for auditing based on four sets of hypotheses in developing students’ oral, written and interpersonal communication skills. In addition, it is more beneficial to the learning process and more enjoyable than the lecture-only method. The extent of achieving both of these is dependent on the type of activity that is consistent with the student’s preferred Pause method activity. Students will achieve higher examination scores when following their preferred Pause activity. Our study replicates the Braun and Simpson’s study in Greater China using one university in Hong Kong and one in mainland China as students in these jurisdictions are more passive learners and their value of learning more extrinsic than intrinsic. The results are similar to the Braun and Simpson’s study, thus enhancing the universality of the “Pause” method.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-236-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Jennifer Evyonne Simpson, Janet Bardsley, Sharif Haider, Kenneth Bayley, Gill Brown, Amanda Harrington-Vail and Ann Dale-Emberton

The purpose of this paper is to communicate the findings of an empirical research project based on a real world problem that involved the development of a continuous…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to communicate the findings of an empirical research project based on a real world problem that involved the development of a continuous professional development (CPD) framework for a children’s integrated service workforce. In addition, to give attention to the notion that children’s integrated services have not necessarily been viewed from the perspective of conflict management and that this has meant ensuing conflicts that characterise such organisations are more often than not ignored.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach involving a mixed methodology consisting of semi-structured interviews for senior managers and service leads; a quantitative survey for frontline practitioners and focus groups for service users, carers and children.

Findings

Rather than the service being fully integrated, services were aligned, and this was reflected in the conflict between professional cultures, reinforcing an “us and them” culture. This culture had seemingly permeated all aspects of the organisation including the senior management team. It was also noted that certain systems and processes, as well as bureaucracy, within the service were seen as hindering integrated working and was in effect a catalyst for conflict.

Research limitations/implications

What has become evident during the course of this empirical study is the need to further explore the functioning of children’s integrated services using conflict management theories, tools and techniques so as to understand how best to manage conflict to an optimum where an environment of creativity and productiveness is created.

Practical implications

Therefore, when devising a CPD framework it can be argued that there is a need to address some of the types of conflict at the micro-frontline practitioner level of the organisation, as it is this level where there is opportunity through a variety of mechanisms, for example formal and non-formal learning, ring-fenced time, attendance at conferences, team away days and shadowing opportunities can be used to achieve a greater understanding of professional roles, improve working relationships and engage in the division of tasks in a fashion that will promote collaborative working.

Social implications

The extent to which a children’s integrated service can be the harbinger of a range of multi-faceted conflicts that include the jarring of professional cultures, task conflict, inter-personal incompatibilities and competing value bases cannot be underestimated. Therefore, when devising a CPD framework it can be argued that there is a need to address some of the types of conflict at the micro-frontline practitioner level of the organisation.

Originality/value

Through the application of conflict management theory it will be illustrated how conflict could be used to effectively steer children integrated services towards creativity and productivity through an organisational wide framework that not only embraces dissonance, but also promotes a learning environment that takes advantage of such dissonance to incorporate a hybrid of professional practice and expertise.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1968

Newcastle's Primary School children, some 24 000 of them, attend 96 different primary schools, giving an average of 250 pupils per school. In common with the primary…

Abstract

Newcastle's Primary School children, some 24 000 of them, attend 96 different primary schools, giving an average of 250 pupils per school. In common with the primary sector in most other local authority areas, the Newcastle intake enjoys the benefit of a relatively liberal primary education. Indeed, the employment of new ideas and methods of instruction has liberated them from much of the dog‐work that has bedevilled education in the city for so long. However, this is not always the case — for only since a short time ago (1967) has the totally reorganized secondary sector made its weight felt in Newcastle's primary schools. This, in turn, has occasioned a predictable re‐appraisal in those schools that were fed from predominant middle‐class areas.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2016

Shaminder Takhar

This chapter addresses Bangladeshi female students’ experiences of higher education in the United Kingdom through the race/gender trajectory. Research shows that although…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter addresses Bangladeshi female students’ experiences of higher education in the United Kingdom through the race/gender trajectory. Research shows that although minority ethnic women invest heavily in education, they go on to face obstacles in the labour market. However, there is a strong desire to study which is evident in the increasing numbers of Bangladeshi women applying to university since 1994. The chapter draws on empirical research with women who have claimed a kind of ‘agentic autonomy’ to pursue education in the face of structural inequalities.

Design/methodology/approach

The chapter is based on research conducted with a sample of Bangladeshi women studying at or recently graduated from university. Qualitative research was carried out in the form of semi-structured interviews with 13 participants.

Findings

The study finds that Bangladeshi women are undeterred by structural inequalities in higher education and employment. Although they expect to face some difficulty finding suitable employment, they are optimistic about the future. They represent a group of women who have been able to achieve their objectives to study at degree level and show aspirations towards achieving similar objectives after graduation.

Originality/value

Bangladeshi women show agency and agentic behaviour to negotiate access to higher education institutions. This will, in the future have a knock-on effect in employment.

Details

Gender and Race Matter: Global Perspectives on Being a Woman
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-037-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

F. Balbaster Benavent, S. Cruz Ros and M. Moreno‐Luzon

Continuous improvement is a primary principle in total quality management. It is applied to all aspects of the organisation including products, processes, and even the…

3522

Abstract

Purpose

Continuous improvement is a primary principle in total quality management. It is applied to all aspects of the organisation including products, processes, and even the management of the firm. In this context, quality management self‐assessment is a useful tool for fostering the continuous improvement of the whole company, comparing its activities and results with an excellence model. However, little is known about the variables and relationships underlying self‐assessment application. This paper tries to shed light on this topic.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is an exploratory case study. Three Spanish organisations with a broad experience in self‐assessment application are analysed.

Findings

A model of self‐assessment application – containing variables and relationships among variables is proposed. Thus, the establishment of a holistic or systemic self‐assessment model where all the variables linked to self‐assessment employment are analytically and explicitly interrelated becomes the fundamental contribution of the research presented here.

Research limitations/implications

This framework may constitute a starting point for subsequent academic research in this area.

Practical implications

The framework may also constitute a practical guide for managers interested in the use of self‐assessment technique.

Originality/value

Provides information on self‐assessment in a continuous improvement context.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Carolina Herrera-Cano and Maria Alejandra Gonzalez-Perez

This chapter aims to evaluate the relationship between the representation of women on corporate boards of directors and its impact on firm financial performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to evaluate the relationship between the representation of women on corporate boards of directors and its impact on firm financial performance.

Design/Methodology/Approach

This study utilized both a systematic review and a meta-analysis, using a sample of 40 published studies, which gleaned financial indicator and observation data from 28 different countries.

Findings

As indicated in previous studies, while positive, there was no significant correlation found between the number of women serving on the boards of directors and firm financial performance.

Research Limitations/Implications

The heterogeneity between the various studies analyzed may present difficulties in making general conclusions. The chapter could also be subject to publication bias, as the selection criteria included may indicate a need for further peer review. Future meta-analyses should include data associated with other financial indicators.

Practical Implications

This study shows how composition ratios of men/women serving on corporate boards should be addressed in terms of proving for a greater diversity of leadership perspectives.

Originality/Value

Previous systematic reviews and meta-analyses have analyzed country environments as moderators for the relationship between the representation of women on corporate boards and firm financial performance. The present study evaluates possible differences between the impact of the number of women serving on the board of directors on a variety of financial indicators (ROA, ROE, and Tobin’s Q).

Article
Publication date: 1 November 1998

Wen‐Hsien Tsai

The purpose of this paper is to present an integrated cost of quality ‐ activity‐based costing (COQ‐ABC) framework for measuring quality costs under ABC. The main…

14209

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to present an integrated cost of quality ‐ activity‐based costing (COQ‐ABC) framework for measuring quality costs under ABC. The main deficiencies of most COQ systems are: (1) no consensus method to allocate overhead costs to COQ elements, (2) the failure to trace quality costs to their sources, and (3) the lack of information about how indirect workers spend their time on various activities. These deficiencies can be easily overcome under ABC together with work sampling. The cost and nonfinancial information achieved from the integrated COQ‐ABC system can be used to identify the magnitude of the quality improvement opportunities, to identify where the quality improvement opportunities exist, and to continuously plan the quality improvement programs and control quality costs. The ultimate goal of the integrated COQ‐ABC system will be to continuously improve processes/activities/quality so that no defects at all are produced and quality cost measurement ultimately becomes unnecessary.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Louise Nash

This chapter is concerned with the relationship between gender performativity and rhythm, taking the City of London (often known by its metonym the Square Mile) as the…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with the relationship between gender performativity and rhythm, taking the City of London (often known by its metonym the Square Mile) as the focus for the empirical research and extending a Lefebvrian understanding of urban space and time via the practice of rhythmanalysis. It is concerned with how the City of London is imagined, constructed and experienced in and through gender performativity which can be expressed rhythmically (Reid-Musson, 2018). The research is based on fieldwork including photographic and interview data, as well as an embodied, immersive methodology used to analyse rhythms, showing how this can help to both sense and make sense of organisational place, particularly in terms of how such places can compel feelings of belonging or non-belonging. The chapter looks beyond the spatial configuration of a single organisation to encompass the wider geographical location of multiple organisations, in this case the City.

The findings show that the relationship between the socio-cultural and material aspects of the City can be understood through the rhythms of place. Using a methodological approach based on Lefebvre's Rhythmanalysis (2004), the chapter foregrounds a subjective, embodied and experiential way of researching the places and spaces of organising, and shows how gendered inclusion and exclusion can be expressed spatially and rhythmically.

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