Search results

1 – 10 of 212
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Dale Richards

The ability for an organisation to adapt and respond to external pressures is a beneficial activity towards optimising efficiency and increasing the likelihood of…

Abstract

Purpose

The ability for an organisation to adapt and respond to external pressures is a beneficial activity towards optimising efficiency and increasing the likelihood of achieving set goals. It can also be suggested that this very ability to adapt to one's surroundings is one of the key factors of resilience. The nature of dynamically responding to sudden change and then to return to a state that is efficient may be termed as possessing the characteristic of plasticity. Uses of agent-based systems in assisting in organisational processes may have a hand in facilitating an organisations' plasticity, and computational modelling has often been used to try and predict both agent and human behaviour. Such models also promise the ability to examine the dynamics of organisational plasticity through the direct manipulation of key factors. This paper discusses the use of such models in application to organisational plasticity and in particular the relevance to human behaviour and perception of agent-based modelling. The uses of analogies for explaining organisational plasticity is also discussed, with particular discussion around the use of modelling. When the authors consider the means by which the authors can adopt theories to explain this type of behaviour, models tend to focus on aspects of predictability. This in turn loses a degree of realism when we consider the complex nature of human behaviour, and more so that of human–agent behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology and approach used for this paper is reflected in the review of the literature and research.

Findings

The use of human–agent behaviour models in organisational plasticity is discussed in this paper.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is based on the importance of considering the human–agent-based models. When compared to agent-based model approaches, analogy is used as a narrative in this paper.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Dale Richards

The increasing use of robotics within modern factories and workplaces not only sees us becoming more dependent on this technology but it also introduces innovative ways by…

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing use of robotics within modern factories and workplaces not only sees us becoming more dependent on this technology but it also introduces innovative ways by which humans interact with complex systems. As agent-based systems become more integrated into work environments, the traditional human team becomes more integrated with agent-based automation and, in some cases, autonomous behaviours. This paper discusses these interactions in terms of team composition and how a human-agent collective can share goals via the delegation of authority between human and agent team members.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper highlights the increasing integration of robotics in everyday life and examines the nature of how new novel teams may be constructed with the use of intelligent systems and autonomous agents.

Findings

Areas of human factors and human-computer interaction are used to discuss the benefits and limitations of human-agent teams.

Research limitations/implications

There is little research in (human–robot) (H–R) teamwork, especially from a human factors perspective.

Practical implications

Advancing the author’s understanding of the H–R team (and associated intelligent agent systems) will assist in the integration of such systems in everyday practices.

Social implications

H–R teams hold a great deal of social and organisational issues that need further exploring. Only through understanding this context can advanced systems be fully realised.

Originality/value

This paper is multidisciplinary, drawing on areas of psychology, computer science, robotics and human–computer Interaction. Specific attention is given to an emerging field of autonomous software agents that are growing in use. This paper discusses the uniqueness of the human-agent teaming that results when human and agent members share a common goal within a team.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Peer-Olaf Siebers, Dinuka Herath, Emanuele Bardone, Siavash Farahbakhsh, Peter Gloggengiehser Knudsen, Jens Koed Madsen, Mehwish Mufti, Martin Neumann, Dale Richards, Raffaello Seri and Davide Secchi

This viewpoint article is concerned with an attempt to advance organisational plasticity (OP) modelling concepts by using a novel community modelling framework (PhiloLab…

Abstract

Purpose

This viewpoint article is concerned with an attempt to advance organisational plasticity (OP) modelling concepts by using a novel community modelling framework (PhiloLab) from the social simulation community to drive the process of idea generation. In addition, the authors want to feed back their experience with PhiloLab as they believe that this way of idea generation could also be of interest to the wider evidence-based human resource management (EBHRM) community.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors used some workshop sessions to brainstorm new conceptual ideas in a structured and efficient way with a multidisciplinary group of 14 (mainly academic) participants using PhiloLab. This is a tool from the social simulation community, which stimulates and formally supports discussions about philosophical questions of future societal models by means of developing conceptual agent-based simulation models. This was followed by an analysis of the qualitative data gathered during the PhiloLab sessions, feeding into the definition of a set of primary axioms of a plastic organisation.

Findings

The PhiloLab experiment helped with defining a set of primary axioms of a plastic organisation, which are presented in this viewpoint article. The results indicated that the problem was rather complex, but it also showed good potential for an agent-based simulation model to tackle some of the key issues related to OP. The experiment also showed that PhiloLab was very useful in terms of knowledge and idea gathering.

Originality/value

Through information gathering and open debates on how to create an agent-based simulation model of a plastic organisation, the authors could identify some of the characteristics of OP and start structuring some of the parameters for a computational simulation. With the outcome of the PhiloLab experiment, the authors are paving the way towards future exploratory computational simulation studies of OP.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

The increasing use of robots has thrown up questions about how they can be integrated successfully into human–robot teams. A research paper by Dale Richards, from the Faculty of Engineering and Computing at Coventry University, discusses how such teams can share goals through delegation between humans and robots, or “agent” members. His research examines such questions as could the agents be allowed to make their own decisions? How would humans react to being told what to do by a robot?

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Paul Willner, Jennifer Bridle, Vaughn Price, Elinor John and Sarah Hunt

An earlier study of health and social services professionals in community teams for people with intellectual disabilities (CTIDs) identified a number of significant gaps…

Abstract

Purpose

An earlier study of health and social services professionals in community teams for people with intellectual disabilities (CTIDs) identified a number of significant gaps in their knowledge of mental capacity issues. The present study aims to ascertain the knowledge of staff working in residential services for people with intellectual disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were staff working in three specialist residential settings catering to people with intellectual disabilities: qualified nurses working in the UK National Health Service (NHS) and in independent‐sector continuing health care settings; and senior staff in residential houses. They were administered the same structured interview as in the earlier study, which was constructed around three scenarios concerning a financial/legal issue, a health issue, and a relationships issue, as well as a set of ten “true/false” statements. Their performance was compared with that of two reference groups, the earlier CTID participants, and a group of staff working in generic (i.e. other than specialist intellectual disability) NHS services.

Findings

No differences in interview performance were found between the three groups of residential carers, who performed better than generic NHS staff but worse than CTID professionals. However, the three residential groups did differ in their self‐ratings of how well‐informed and confident they felt in relation to mental capacity issues.

Originality/value

The study shows that staff working in residential services for people with intellectual disabilities have only a limited understanding of mental capacity issues and their confidence in their own knowledge may not be a good guide to their ability to deal with such issues when they arise in practice.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

A.I. Temple and B.G. Dale

A study carried out at UMIST of the operation of white‐collarcircles in manufacturing firms is reported. Despite the problemsassociated with initiating and sustaining…

Abstract

A study carried out at UMIST of the operation of white‐collar circles in manufacturing firms is reported. Despite the problems associated with initiating and sustaining white‐collar circles, it is not suggested that they should be avoided.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

A.I. Temple and B.G. Dale

A recent research project on white collar quality circles in manufacturing industry was carried out because previous research at UMIST indicated that white collar circles…

Abstract

A recent research project on white collar quality circles in manufacturing industry was carried out because previous research at UMIST indicated that white collar circles were more difficult to set up and sustain. The study involved interviews in eleven companies which had or had had white collar circles, and questionnaire surveys of manufacturing companies and quality circle consultants. The findings indicate that white collar circles are no more difficult to initiate than blue collar circles but they can be harder to sustain. There was little evidence that companies were aware of the benefits of increasing white collar productivity or the part that circles can play in this and white collar workers are often sceptical about the relevance of circles to them. It was also found that white collar circles can face difficulties such as problem choice, over‐complex projects, organising meetings and a tendency to form multi‐disciplinary groups. Companies intending to start white collar circles need to be aware of the pitfalls but these should not deter them from setting them up.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

B. Dale

The UMIST Multi‐Company Quality Management Programme, run under the Teaching Company Scheme, is a unique endeavour to build active partnerships between industrial…

Abstract

The UMIST Multi‐Company Quality Management Programme, run under the Teaching Company Scheme, is a unique endeavour to build active partnerships between industrial companies and academics. This paper reviews the benefit and outcomes to the Associates, companies and academics and provides guidance in setting‐up and managing this type of programme.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Keith Hurst

This out‐of‐hours primary and community care services (more recently called unscheduled care) literature review sets out to build on the foundations set by earlier…

Abstract

Purpose

This out‐of‐hours primary and community care services (more recently called unscheduled care) literature review sets out to build on the foundations set by earlier publications by examining old and fresh issues after the new General Medical Service contract was implemented in 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

Almost 140 publications were located, including a range of theoretical and empirical publications.

Findings

A total of seven themes emerge – varying from the most frequently discussed (service nature and value) to the least examined (information management and technology).

Originality/value

Analysis not only underlines service problems and tensions noted previously but also generates new insights, which cannot be ignored if services are to be developed. Consequently, several recommendations are made.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Melissa Adler

This chapter demonstrates how the University of Waikato in New Zealand adapted a global standard (the Library of Congress Classification) for local use by inscribing…

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates how the University of Waikato in New Zealand adapted a global standard (the Library of Congress Classification) for local use by inscribing topics related to and about Māori history and people.

The findings are the result of using library catalogs and classifications as primary historical documents.

The University of Waikato’s classification simultaneously uses and implicitly critiques a universal system written from a U.S. vantage point. It seems to acknowledge the benefits and necessities of using a globally recognized standard, as well as a need to inscribe local, anticolonial perspectives into that system.

The research relies on historical documents, and some aspects related to purpose and attribution are difficult to ascertain.

The local adaptation of the Library of Congress Classification may serve as a model for other local adaptations.

This may bring new dimensions to thinking about colonialism and anticolonialism in knowledge organization systems. It contributes to ongoing conversations regarding indigenous knowledge organization practices.

Although scholars have examined Māori subject headings, research on local shelf classifications in New Zealand have not been objects of study in the context of global and local knowledge organization. This chapter brings an important classification to light.

1 – 10 of 212