Search results

1 – 10 of 174
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 February 2021

Edmund Wut, Peggy Ng, Ka Shing Wilson Leung and Daisy Lee

This study aims to investigate whether gamified elements affect the use behaviour of young people (between age 12 and 25 years) on consumption-related mobile applications.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether gamified elements affect the use behaviour of young people (between age 12 and 25 years) on consumption-related mobile applications.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on 151 young people between the ages of 12 and 25 years.

Findings

The results showed that use behaviour on consumption mobile applications was affected by gamification. Behavioural intention to use was affected by the performance expectancy (PE) and effort expectancy (EE) of mobile application designs. Mobile applications characteristics do not affect behavioural intention to use mobile applications but through the mediator mobile application designs.

Research limitations/implications

This study also proposes mechanisms that explain how mobile apps characteristics affect EE and PE through app designs. Use behaviour is affected by Gamification elements. Affective need and social need link up uses and gratification (U&G) theory and unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT)in gamification context. This study confirms the affective need affecting behavioural intention (Thongsri et al., 2018). In this regard, the mechanism between the relationship of affective need and behavioural intention was showed. Affective need through both PE and EE influencing behavioural intention.

Practical implications

Corporations should consider adding gamified elements into consumption-related mobile apps to increasing usage behaviour. Lucky draws, quizzes and games could be built in for mobile apps. Mobile app designs and characteristics could improve user experience by allowing consumers to perform their search and buying processes easily. Mobile app designs will not directly influence “behavioral intention to use” but use behaviour.

Social implications

Practitioners need to look at the problem from technological and customer perspectives. From technological viewpoint, both mobile apps characteristics and design are important in affecting user behaviour. From customer’s perspective, it would be helpful to add gaming elements to the mobile apps and induce emotion. One may also use visual image to create an immersive experience on the development of storyline. Prospective customers might focus on what is going on in the story and pay less attention on its own logic. Thus, simply lucky draw might not have a true effect since player have its own belief working. A suitable story element could have positive effect on mobile apps use behaviour.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to examine the association between gamification and use behaviour on consumption-related mobile applications. A new framework was proposed by integrating UTAUT model and U&G theory.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Peggy Ng, Daisy Lee, Phoebe Wong and Regan Lam

Little research has been done on how university information sources influence advice-seeking attitude, intention, and behavior between students with high and low…

Abstract

Purpose

Little research has been done on how university information sources influence advice-seeking attitude, intention, and behavior between students with high and low susceptibility to online information. Our study addressed this gap by empirically demonstrating the role that students’ susceptibility to online information plays in terms of the effect of attitude, social norm and perceived behavioral control on their advice-seeking intention and behavior using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The purpose of this study is to examine differences in the susceptibility to online sources on students’ advice-seeking behavior when making an institution choice.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey was involved, and this empirical study was performed on the basis of a sample of 621 students from publicly-funded high schools in Hong Kong. Multigroup analysis (MGA) was conducted to (i.e. students with high susceptibility to online sources/ students with low susceptibility to online sources) to examine students’ behavioral intention regarding advice seeking about institution choice. 10;

Findings

The results of the study revealed that students with high susceptibility to online information were likely to be influenced by the social norm in applying the TPB model. Conversely, students with low susceptibility to online information had low intention to seek advice from others as they are independent and noninformation seekers. Implications for higher education institutions are discussed.

Originality/value

This study provides a modified version of the TPB model while also demonstrating how students with high/low susceptibility to online sources affect their behavioral intention to seek advice from others about making a university choice. Also, this study provides insights into institutions regarding the promotion of marketing information via online and offline sources.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Phoebe Wong, Daisy Lee and Peggy M.L. Ng

A fuller understanding of the information search behaviour of prospective students in the digital era is one of the keys to success in university recruitment. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

A fuller understanding of the information search behaviour of prospective students in the digital era is one of the keys to success in university recruitment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate students’ university choice factors in relation to the online environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 637 samples from 11 private higher education institutions were collected and tested against assumptions before performing statistical analysis including exploratory factor analysis and mean comparison.

Findings

The findings revealed that there are some significant differences in gender and academic discipline in the use of the internet to search for university information. In addition, four constructs of university information were identified that are perceived as important by students in their search behaviour: “university reputation”, “eligibility and affordability”, “teaching and learning” and “university tangibility”. The outcomes of this research provide some noteworthy insights which have numerous strategic digital marketing implications.

Originality/value

While most existing studies have explored types of social media apps or online channels that prospective students use, little research has touched on students’ university choice factors in relation to the online environment. Responding to Constantinides and Zinck Stagno (2011) and Hemsley-Brown et al.’s (2016) call, this paper aims to address this research gap by investigating students’ university information search in relation to the online environment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 December 2019

Phoebe Wong, Peggy M.L. Ng, Daisy Lee and Regan Lam

Understanding the influences in the decision-making process of prospective students when choosing a university is crucial in student recruitment. The purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Understanding the influences in the decision-making process of prospective students when choosing a university is crucial in student recruitment. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of perceived source credibility on attitudes and intentions towards taking advice from significant others (e.g. parents, peers and teachers) on university choice.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 626 samples from eight government-subsidised secondary schools were collected and tested using the component-based structural equation modelling of partial least squares.

Findings

The findings verified factors of source credibility that determine prospective students’ attitudes towards taking advice from others. Attitudes and subjective norms explained 49 per cent of the variance in intention to take advice from others on university choice. The findings of the present study provide practical marketing insights for enrolment and recruitment managers.

Originality/value

While most studies focus on students’ university choice in the recruitment process, studies on perceived source credibility of significant others in the university choice decision-making process are limited.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Marlon Santiago Viñán-Ludeña and Luis M. de Campos

The main aim of this paper is to build an approach to analyze the tourist content posted on social media. The approach incorporates information extraction, cleaning, data…

Abstract

Purpose

The main aim of this paper is to build an approach to analyze the tourist content posted on social media. The approach incorporates information extraction, cleaning, data processing, descriptive and content analysis and can be used on different social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, etc. This work proposes an approach to social media analytics in traveler-generated content (TGC), and the authors use Twitter to apply this study and examine data about the city and the province of Granada.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to identify what people are talking and posting on social media about places, events, restaurants, hotels, etc. the authors propose the following approach for data collection, cleaning and data analysis. The authors first identify the main keywords for the place of study. A descriptive analysis is subsequently performed, and this includes post metrics with geo-tagged analysis and user metrics, retweets and likes, comments, videos, photos and followers. The text is then cleaned. Finally, content analysis is conducted, and this includes word frequency calculation, sentiment and emotion detection and word clouds. Topic modeling was also performed with latent Dirichlet association (LDA).

Findings

The authors used the framework to collect 262,859 tweets about Granada. The most important hashtags are #Alhambra and #SierraNevada, and the most prolific user is @AlhambraCultura. The approach uses a seasonal context, and the posted tweets are divided into two periods (spring–summer and autumn–winter). Word frequency was calculated and again Granada, Alhambra are the most frequent words in both periods in English and Spanish. The topic models show the subjects that are mentioned in both languages, and although there are certain small differences in terms of language and season, the Alhambra, Sierra Nevada and gastronomy stand out as the most important topics.

Research limitations/implications

Extremely difficult to identify sarcasm, posts may be ambiguous, users may use both Spanish and English words in their tweets and tweets may contain spelling mistakes, colloquialisms or even abbreviations. Multilingualism represents also an important limitation since it is not clear how tweets written in different languages should be processed. The size of the data set is also an important factor since the greater the amount of data, the better the results. One of the largest limitations is the small number of geo-tagged tweets as geo-tagging would provide information about the place where the tweet was posted and opinions of it.

Originality/value

This study proposes an interesting way to analyze social media data, bridging tourism and social media literature in the data analysis context and contributes to discover patterns and features of the tourism destination through social media. The approach used provides the prospective traveler with an overview of the most popular places and the major posters for a particular tourist destination. From a business perspective, it informs managers of the most influential users, and the information obtained can be extremely useful for managing their tourism products in that region.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Susan Frelich Appleton and Susan Ekberg Stiritz

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their…

Abstract

This paper explores four works of contemporary fiction to illuminate formal and informal regulation of sex. The paper’s co-authors frame analysis with the story of their creation of a transdisciplinary course, entitled “Regulating Sex: Historical and Cultural Encounters,” in which students mined literature for social critique, became immersed in the study of law and its limits, and developed increased sensitivity to power, its uses, and abuses. The paper demonstrates the value theoretically and pedagogically of third-wave feminisms, wild zones, and contact zones as analytic constructs and contends that including sex and sexualities in conversations transforms personal experience, education, society, and culture, including law.

Details

Special Issue: Feminist Legal Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-782-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Shi‐Wei Ricky Lee, Ben Hoi Wai Lui, Y.H. Kong, Bernard Baylon, Timothy Leung, Pompeo Umali and Hector Agtarap

Evaluates the board level reliability of plastic ball grid array (PBGA) assemblies under thermal and mechanical loading, with the objective of characterizing the…

Abstract

Evaluates the board level reliability of plastic ball grid array (PBGA) assemblies under thermal and mechanical loading, with the objective of characterizing the reliability of lead‐free solder joints for various assembly conditions. A five‐leg experiment was designed which included various combinations of solder materials and peak reflow temperatures. It was found that the lead‐free solder joints have a much longer thermal fatigue life than the 63Sn–37Pb solder. The 63Sn–37Pb solder joints seem to perform slightly better than the lead‐free solder under mechanical loading.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Jeffery C.C. Lo, B.F. Jia, Z. Liu, J. Zhu and S.W. Ricky Lee

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the lead‐free solder joint reliability of a variety of surface mount components assembled onto printed circuit boards (PCBs) under…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the lead‐free solder joint reliability of a variety of surface mount components assembled onto printed circuit boards (PCBs) under a number of different tests.

Design/methodology/approach

Lead‐free solder with a composition of Sn96.5‐Ag3.0‐Cu0.5 was used in a surface mount reflow process. Different types of surface mount dummy components with a daisy chain, such as CBGAs, BGAs, PLCCs, CSPs, and QFNs, were assembled onto PCBs. Both the mechanical and thermo‐mechanical reliability of the solder joints were evaluated by several tests. The experiments included package shear, package pull, three‐point bending and accelerated thermal cycling testing for 2,000 cycles. The packages were examined by X‐ray and C‐SAM before the reliability tests were carried out. The maximum load and the corresponding load‐displacement curve were recorded in the mechanical test.

Findings

The results from the mechanical tests show the major failure mode is on the copper pad. Weibull analysis shows that the characteristic lives of most packages are between 1,100 and 2,400 cycles. For the CBGA, the characteristic life of 96 cycles is relatively short, due to the serious CTE mismatch. Cross‐section inspection shows failures occur at the solder joint. Copper pad failure is also observed.

Originality/value

This paper provides both the mechanical and thermal‐mechanical reliability of lead‐free solder joints. The experimental data are very useful in the lead‐free SMT industries.

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Heidi Hanson and Elizabeth (Zoe) Stewart-Marshall

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Melissa Rikiatou Kana Kenfack and Ali Öztüren

It is salient to be acquainted with the key elements that determine educational tourists’ decision in selecting an overseas destination while considering the rise of…

Abstract

It is salient to be acquainted with the key elements that determine educational tourists’ decision in selecting an overseas destination while considering the rise of international competition amidst nations concerning international students. There has been a growth in the number of nations committed to attracting educational tourists. This issue is evident in countries involved in higher education (HE), such as Northern Cyprus, identified as an edu-tourism destination. Northern Cyprus can attract a whopping number of tourists, and the higher population is most likely to be made up of international students regardless of its interdiction on direct flights and political pressure. This chapter centres on analysing educational tourists’ motivators in selecting a tourism education destination abroad and on revealing effective recruitment and promotion plans towards attracting them. The chapter includes the descriptions and discussions of educational tourism, the HE industry over the years, globalisation and internationalisation of educational tourism, factors influencing educational tourists’ decision-making process and key elements influencing educational tourists’ decisions in HE institutions. At the end of the chapter, a case study is presented that reports the findings of interviews with educational tourists, overseas recruitment agents and Eastern Mediterranean University staff responsible for promoting the institution. The results identified eight factors affecting educational tourists’ decisions on study destination. Those factors comprise cost, ease of access, location, social factors, quality of education, instruction language, cultural environment and communication quality. The sub-factors of the main eight factors are scholarships, destination’s scenery, safety, friends’ and relatives’ influence and cultural differences. This chapter brings a significant knowledge about the motives that affect educational tourists in selecting at a particular HE destination. Based on the study’s findings, educational institutions may consider various recommendations to redesign their strategies towards attracting educational tourists more effectively. Generally, this study promotes an apprehension about the diverse elements that affect educational tourists’ selection of a destination study. An in-depth understanding of these factors will help education institutions’ decision-makers better develop plans of action to provide desired services to educational tourists, attract and keep them in return.

Details

Global Perspectives on Recruiting International Students: Challenges and Opportunities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-518-7

Keywords

1 – 10 of 174