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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2007

Sertaç Gönenç and Erkan Rehber

This article aims to focus on the issue of privatization movement in the agro‐food sector, in the light of the Turkish Dairy Industry Enterprises (TSEK) case, and the…

1086

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to focus on the issue of privatization movement in the agro‐food sector, in the light of the Turkish Dairy Industry Enterprises (TSEK) case, and the effects on the sector following privatization. In order to make an appropriate evaluation, the background of the privatization movement and the general structure of the dairy sector in Turkey are examined first.

Design/methodology/approach

After a brief evaluation, the privatization process of TSEK and its effects on the sector are discussed in the light of the results of empirical data that obtain from the ANOVA model.

Findings

It has been concluded that the liberalization process has been adopted without the setting up of market regulatory policies, thus, the price balance in the dairy sector has changed to the disadvantage of both producers and consumers, while market concentration has increased and regional differentials have become more apparent.

Originality/value

This article may be relevant for other countries where privatization or liberalization movement in the agro‐food sector is in process.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Goodluck Charles Urassa

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of the regulatory framework on the competitiveness of the dairy sector of Tanzania. More precisely, it attempts to…

422

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the effect of the regulatory framework on the competitiveness of the dairy sector of Tanzania. More precisely, it attempts to identify the main regulations governing the dairy industry and examines areas in which they overlap. The paper explores the effect of the regulatory framework on the business enterprises operating in the sector and highlights ongoing initiatives for harmonisation of the regulations affecting the dairy sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study that culminated in the paper was qualitative in nature, being based on case studies of two enterprises operating in the dairy industry, secondary data, in-depth discussions with industry stakeholders through personal interviews and focus group discussions. The paper also draws on observations made of the advocacy project that is going on to review regulations in the dairy sector.

Findings

The dairy sector in Tanzania is facing significant regulatory challenges, leading to the high cost of doing business. The main regulatory burdens facing the sector are: multiple inspections of premises, multiple testing of products, multiplicity of licences for premises and products, and the use of regulations as a source of revenue. Bureaucratic roadblocks add costs to businesses and reduce the competitiveness of products and services, as well as the potential for business expansion and job creation. While the private sector appears to succeed in creating awareness of the issue, it has not yet succeeded in pressurising the government to take action to bring about policy change.

Practical implications

The findings of the paper will inform policy makers and the private sector on how the regulations affect the competitiveness of the dairy industry. The paper will also aid advocacy initiatives by private sector organisations by providing empirical evidence concerning the damaging effect of the regulatory framework and will contribute some ideas on how to carry forward the ongoing dialogue between the private and public sector.

Originality/value

The paper fills the gap resulting from the lack of empirical evidence regarding the impact of the regulatory framework on the competitiveness of the private sector in the context of a developing economy. It demonstrates how systematic research on advocacy issues raised by the private sector could be used to generate evidence that informs and motivates policy change. The paper also applies the theory of regulation to a specific industry to show how regulatory reforms could be attained.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Mary Hendrickson, William D. Heffernan, Philip H. Howard and Judith B. Heffernan

Discusses the restructuring of the food production, processing and retailing sectors in the USA. Describes different methods of vertical and horizontal integration that…

5776

Abstract

Discusses the restructuring of the food production, processing and retailing sectors in the USA. Describes different methods of vertical and horizontal integration that have occurred. Goes on to discuss the consolidation of business in retailing in particular. Refers to the relationships that are being formed between the supermarket chains, for example Wal‐Mart and Kroger, and dominant food‐chain clusters. Considers whether or not smaller retail chains and wholesalers should feel threatened by this consolidation. Takes the dairy sector in the USA as a case study in the restructuring of the retailing and processing sectors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 103 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2012

Reidar Almås and Jostein Brobakk

Purpose – Dairy has been the backbone of agriculture in regional Norway, and the processing of milk has been dominated by co-operatives owned by milk farmers. During the…

Abstract

Purpose – Dairy has been the backbone of agriculture in regional Norway, and the processing of milk has been dominated by co-operatives owned by milk farmers. During the social democratic order (1945–1979), productivist agriculture thrived, while a more multifunctional agriculture was developed after 1980. As a measure against overproduction, a quota system was introduced in 1983. The purpose of this study is to see if there are signs of a neo-productivism revival after climate change and other global shocks, like the food crisis, featured prominently on the political agenda.

Design/methodology/approach – The chapter reviews the radical structural changes in Norwegian dairy production since the early 1960s, which reduced the number of milk farms radically from 148,000 in 1959 to almost 16,000 in 2009. According to the Agricultural Agreement between the Norwegian government and the farmers' organisations, the co-operatives are given an important semi-public role as market-price regulators and stock keepers. This Norwegian system may be described as a classical regulated dairy regime. The Norwegian dairy regime has been through several deregulations and re-regulations over the last 20 years, partly forced by internal pressures and partly inspired by liberalisation tendencies abroad.

Findings – After mid-1990s, there has been an increase in the number of joint dairy farms, where individual ownership of land is maintained while herds, buildings and machinery are merged. Three thousand six hundred thirty dairy farmers are now participating in 1,510 joint farming firms, producing 29 per cent of the milk in Norway. This rapid growth of joint farming is transforming the dairy sector in Norway. Analysis has shown that its evolution is closely tied to farmer socio-economic demands, including social benefits, such as increased leisure time, and security during illness. While there has been pressure to increase productivity, the food crisis changed attitudes, making the current policy of import tariffs and subsidies easier to defend.

Originality/value – This chapter shows that neo-liberalism in Norway was not pursued as far as in most other OECD countries, although some deregulation was taking place. Norwegian agricultural policies are still regulating the sector to a substantial degree, with the annual Agricultural Agreement negotiations serving as a centrepiece. Norway has ambitious climate goals, and by 2020 greenhouse gases emissions should be reduced to 30 per cent of the 1990 rate. A further goal is that Norway will be carbon neutral by 2030. As part of the implementation of its climate policy, a White Paper on agriculture and climate change was put forward in May 2009. For Norwegian food production as a whole, a change towards more grazing at the expense of crops would improve carbon storage and reduce the overall use of fertiliser. Such a shift in land use would benefit the dairy sector, in part because of easier access to domestically grown cow feed.

Details

Rethinking Agricultural Policy Regimes: Food Security, Climate Change and the Future Resilience of Global Agriculture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-349-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

R.J.G. Wells

It is noted that a number of presently developing countries, in an attempt to offset the unfavourable internal terms of trade facing their agricultural sector, have…

Abstract

It is noted that a number of presently developing countries, in an attempt to offset the unfavourable internal terms of trade facing their agricultural sector, have recently increased subsidies to this sector. A useful aid to the measurement of subsidies is the Producer Subsidy Equivalent (PSE); this conceptually simple “tool” possesses the merit of being easily computed and easily comprehended by policy‐makers. In this article the results of a study of PSEs for the dairy industry in Peninsular Malaysia are presented and analysed. Overall, it is observed that the dairy industry is heavily subsidised, with the parastatal ranch sector more so than the smallholder sector. Doubt is also expressed as to whether the infant‐industry argument is a valid one in Malaysian conditions.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Case study
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Mukund R. Dixit

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in…

Abstract

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in the case discussion are required to review the developments in the organisation and recommend a strategy for the future.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Jonas da Silva Oliveira, Graça Maria do Carmo Azevedo, Cláudia da Silva Amaral Santos and Sandra Cristina Santos Vasconcelos

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it intends to assess the level of comparability of the fair value-based valuation criteria for biological assets of Portuguese…

1587

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it intends to assess the level of comparability of the fair value-based valuation criteria for biological assets of Portuguese dairy farms after the adoption of the Portuguese Accounting Standardization System. Second, it presents an innovative valuation model to assess the fair value of dairy herds.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper conducts a multiple case study at dairy farms in the central region of Portugal which had adopted the new Accounting Standardization System. Data were captured through interviews to assess how dairy farms were using the new valuation criteria required by this recent accounting frame of reference. A proposal for a model to measure fair value is presented.

Findings

Main findings indicate that market values for dairy production animals are inconsistent, reducing financial information comparability levels. To solve these problems, the authors propose a new model to assess fair value based on the net present value (NPV) of future cash-flows. This is a possible method to measure bovines that are in a breeding stage and it will assure the comparability of financial statements among dairy farms.

Research limitations/implications

The study is confined to one case study and one country, not allowing generalization.

Originality/value

Results indicate the need to harmonize one possible method for measuring cattle that are in a breeding stage. In order to overcome these shortcomings, a model was designed to calculate the fair value of dairy production based on the NPV of future economic benefits.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 75 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2022

Andrea Lorena González, Juan Carlos Hallak, Gabriel Scattolo and Andrés Tacsir

The purpose of this research is to analyze the ability of agrifood systems to construct “customized competitiveness” strategies that can allow firms to meet the specific…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to analyze the ability of agrifood systems to construct “customized competitiveness” strategies that can allow firms to meet the specific and constantly changing demands of foreign markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The research performs a comparative analysis of three case studies of agrifood systems in Argentina: lemon, pork, and dairy products. The authors obtained primary data from 79 semi-structured interviews with key persons in each agrifood system carried out online between March 2020 and February 2021. Secondary data was obtained from databases, academic studies, and reports from business associations and public agencies.

Findings

The authors find wide disparities in the development of customized competitiveness strategies between the studied agrifood systems (higher in lemon, lower in dairy products, and incipient in pork). The authors attribute the disparity to the varying degrees in which these systems are capable of coordinating their own actions and their interactions with State agencies.

Originality/value

The paper provides comparative evidence about the role of private coordination in the ability of agrifood systems to construct customized competitiveness strategies.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Bruce Muirhead

The chapter will document the Canadian reaction, as reflected in the demand of New Zealand, that Canada fundamentally alters its dairy supply management system in order to…

Abstract

The chapter will document the Canadian reaction, as reflected in the demand of New Zealand, that Canada fundamentally alters its dairy supply management system in order to participate in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations. The Canadian government has resolutely refused to do so, supported wholeheartedly by dairy farmers throughout the country. This is in part because of the effect such an action would have on rural spaces and the debilitating result it would have on Canadian dairy production. As well, the chapter will address the issue of the cost of dairy products in New Zealand as compared with Canada. Part of this analysis will focus on the role of supermarkets in determining the price structure of milk in both Canada and New Zealand. Finally, the chapter will offer an examination of the New Zealand system as represented by Fonterra and the Canadian system as epitomized by dairy supply management.

Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Rahul S. Mor, Arvind Bhardwaj and Sarbjit Singh

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key performance indicators (PIs) that serve as a decision support tool in case of dairy supply chain practices and to analyze…

1100

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the key performance indicators (PIs) that serve as a decision support tool in case of dairy supply chain practices and to analyze their interactions in the context of Indian dairy industry sector. A total of 11 PIs have been identified through the literature review and the opinions of an expert team consisting of managerial and technical experts from dairy industry and academics.

Design/methodology/approach

A solution methodology based on the interpretive structure modeling (ISM) technique is used to analyze the interactions among PIs and to propose a structural model. The developed model not only helps in understanding the contextual relationship among the PIs, but also in determining their interdependence to assess the supply chain performance in dairy industry. Further, the importance of PIs has been determined based on their driving and dependence power by using MICMAC analysis.

Findings

The ISM-based model suggests four PIs at first level, three PIs at second level, one PI at third level as well as one PI at fourth level and two PIs at fifth level. Model allocates to the effective information technology, brand management, responsiveness in shipment and accuracy and a control over wastages as the key PIs in the dairy industry sector. The effective traceability systems, cold chain infrastructure, quality management and the support for technological innovations are the next major PIs. There exists no autonomous PI in MICMAC analysis which proves the importance of identified PIs in the case study.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model is an attempt to capture the dynamics of milk processing sector and to incorporate all relevant constraints related to internal and external environments that would significantly improve the supply chain performance in the dairy industry.

Practical implications

The model developed in this study has been tested in the cooperative milk processing units based in India and also discussed with the experts from academics. This work may help practitioners, regulators and dairy industry professionals to focus their efforts toward achieving high performance by the effective implementation of the identified PIs.

Originality/value

In this study, 11 PIs are considered. Interactions among PIs are evaluated with the help of the ISM matrix. Out of the 11 PIs, six demonstrate both strong driving and dependence power as explained in the MICMAC analysis.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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