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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Daeho Kim, Chul Woo Moon and Jiseon Shin

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of empowering leadership at the team level on employees’ subjective well-being (SWB) and work performance through…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of empowering leadership at the team level on employees’ subjective well-being (SWB) and work performance through perceived social support. Based on social exchange theory (Blau, 1964), the study identifies the mediating effects of perceived social support in the relationship between empowering leadership and both employees’ well-being and work performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a survey of 1,225 employees working for an organization in South Korea and archival data of the organization. It employed hierarchical linear modeling analyses and the CWC(M) procedure for the tests of multilevel mediation.

Findings

It was observed that perceived organizational support (POS) and co-worker support (PCS) mediated the relationship between empowering leadership and SWB, but not the relationship between empowering leadership and performance. There was a significant direct effect of empowering leadership on both POS and PCS, which subsequently led to improved work performance.

Originality/value

Taking a multilevel approach to leadership and relying on both self-reported and organizational archival data, this study contributes to the literature on leadership and well-being by examining the relationships between empowering leadership toward a team and team members’ well-being and performance, and by revealing the crucial mechanisms that underlie them. The study helps to elucidate the impact of empowering leadership on employee SWB, which has largely been neglected in prior management research.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Daeho Kim

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the scope of universal service has been extended from voice telephony to include broadband and mobile communications in Korea

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how the scope of universal service has been extended from voice telephony to include broadband and mobile communications in Korea. This paper addresses how Korea's approach to broadband and mobile service utilizes different strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an analysis of universal service policies. It applies five criteria for reviewing whether broadband and mobile communications could be included in the scope of universal service.

Findings

This paper addresses Korea's approach to broadband and mobile service utilizes different strategies. An information society policy was applied to broadband diffusion, while a regulatory policy was applied to mobile service diffusion. Korea's universal service expansion policy shows a government and industry integration model.

Originality/value

This paper shows Korea's unique approach for universal service. It deals with how universal service has been driven forward as a part of an information society plan and information divide bridging policy in Korea. With flexible approaches, broadband and mobile services could start to be regarded as universal services.

Details

info, vol. 10 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Claire Milne and Claudio Feijoo

This paper aims to give conclusions from the papers in the special issue about “Re‐thinking universal service in the digital era”.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to give conclusions from the papers in the special issue about “Re‐thinking universal service in the digital era”.

Design/methodology/approach

A summary of the themes, trends and new concepts about universal service is compiled from the varied viewpoints introduced in the issue. The editors also appraise the mobile and broadband universal service candidates under the different perspectives in the issue, point out a number of questionable assumptions and gaps in the universal service stories, and touch on the international currents of influence in universal service policy. Finally, a succinct vision of a universal service policy for Europe is outlined.

Findings

This special issue aims to provide support to the policy process with regard to universal service in a digital context. The papers in the issue highlight developments that are shaking up the current universal service model. They consider universal service from a set of different dimensions, encompassing both demand and supply side considerations. Also a comparative outlook draws lessons from a representative set of existing regulatory models.

Originality/value

The paper provides a summary of the main avenues for the upcoming universal service policy debate.

Details

info, vol. 10 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Claudio Feijoo and Claire Milne

The purpose of this paper is to introduce to the concepts related with universal service and the papers in the special issue about “Re‐thinking universal service in the

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce to the concepts related with universal service and the papers in the special issue about “Re‐thinking universal service in the digital era”.

Design/methodology/approach

This special issue aims to provide support to the policy process with regard to universal service in a digital context. The papers in the issue highlight developments that are shaking up the current universal service model. They consider universal service from a set of different dimensions, encompassing both demand and supply side considerations. Also a comparative outlook draws lessons from a representative set of existing regulatory models.

Findings

The paper finds that the foundations and concept of universal service are experiencing a profound transformation as we enter into a new phase of information society development. A new set of policy goals and tools is the main consequence of this change.

Originality/value

The paper presents a timely account of the universal service policy debate.

Details

info, vol. 10 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Hana Kim, Daeho Lee and Jun-Seok Hwang

Even though network externality plays an important role in users’ motivations to use services or products, the implications of this are not clear because previous studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Even though network externality plays an important role in users’ motivations to use services or products, the implications of this are not clear because previous studies did not distinguish between the number of peers and the number of total users. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that there is a difference between the two network externalities, i.e., the number of peers and the total number of users. To accomplish this, the perception of quality of life is considered to have an impact on the effects of the two different network externalities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a survey that covered 508 online game players in South Korea, and the two hypotheses of “player experience of need satisfaction” from self-determination theory as well as user gratification theory (UGT) were assessed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results indicate that people consider the total number of users and the number of peers differently. In addition, the effects of the total number of users and the number of peers vary according to respondents’ perceived life quality in four dimensions: loneliness, happiness, satisfaction with life (SWL), and escapism. In particular, people’s offline tendencies are reflected online in terms of loneliness, whereas online life compensates for a lack of enjoyment offline.

Originality/value

The authors verify that UGT can affect the network externality by considering perceived quality of life (loneliness, SWL, happiness, and escapism) as a moderating effect.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Daeho Lee and Dong-Hee Shin

The purpose of this study is to categorize network neutrality according to its issues under debate and assess the state of the debate based on such organization. In…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to categorize network neutrality according to its issues under debate and assess the state of the debate based on such organization. In addition, the study discusses the reasons that network neutrality is so difficult to solve and the future research directions that would do so.

Design/methodology/approach

This study presents a critical review of the current network neutrality issues and summarizes the economic background of each position in the debate. The relevant literature is organized by issue to examine the reasons that the network neutrality debate is so difficult to solve and determine the further study required to solve it.

Findings

An analysis of the relevant literature suggests that the proponents and opponents of network neutrality disagree on the best methods of developing the Internet. Therefore, future research and regulatory and practitioners’ applications would greatly benefit from a comprehensive review of that literature.

Originality/value

Network neutrality regulation is receiving increased attention because the development and significant influences of the Internet are becoming more apparent.

Details

info, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Jeehun Kim

Korean educational migrant (kirogi) families have received widespread popular attention due to their ironic form of family that sacrifices the togetherness of a family…

Abstract

Korean educational migrant (kirogi) families have received widespread popular attention due to their ironic form of family that sacrifices the togetherness of a family. Recent trends suggest that this practice is spreading to the less affluent classes and that many such families are heading to ‘new’ destinations, including Singapore. This study examines the transnational schooling and life experiences of Korean transnational educational families in Singapore. It addresses the questions, why did these families choose Singapore? Why did transnational schooling, which parents almost unanimously said that they had organised for the betterment of their children's future, lead to some families getting stuck in the destination country?

Fieldwork in Singapore and Korea was conducted between April 2006 and September 2007. In-depth interviews with both mothers and fathers who have at least one child attending public, private or international schools in Singapore, at the primary or secondary level, were conducted with 18 families. The analysis was conducted using a grounded theory approach and NVivo 7/8.

Although the Korean state's emphasis on international competitiveness and parental aspirations for their children's future upward social mobility were common motivators, Koreans in Singapore were also attracted by the relatively low cost, English–Chinese bilingualism and other ‘family-friendly’ features in Singapore. However, kirogi children had highly contrasting schooling experiences and they met with mixed success in gaining what they expected. Furthermore, many children in public schools faced demotion and other difficulties in their new school environments. Some less affluent families found themselves facing dilemmas of cross-border schooling. This study shows that transnational schooling does not necessarily operate equally favourably for participants from diverse class backgrounds. It also demonstrates that the societal contexts of reception in both the countries of origin and of destination, including the buffering institutions and reference groups and peer culture, are important factors shaping the schooling and life experiences of educational migrant children and in reconfiguring their trajectories.

Details

Globalization, Changing Demographics, and Educational Challenges in East Asia
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-977-0

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